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Found 775 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
2012
[Mueller2012] Müller, M., M. Graus, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, A. Metzger, J. Dommen, and U. Baltensperger, "Analysis of high mass resolution PTR-TOF mass spectra from 1, 3, 5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) environmental chamber experiments", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 2: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 829–843, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/829/
Abstract
A series of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) photo-oxidation experiments was performed in the 27-m3 Paul Scherrer Institute environmental chamber under various NOx conditions. A University of Innsbruck prototype high resolution Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF) was used for measurements of gas and particulate phase organics. The gas phase mass spectrum displayed  200 ion signals during the TMB photo-oxidation experiments. Molecular formulas CmHnNoOp were determined and ion signals were separated and grouped according to their C, O and N numbers. This allowed to determine the time evolution of the O:C ratio and of the average carbon oxidation state OSC of the reaction mixture. Both quantities were compared with master chemical mechanism (MCMv3.1) simulations. The O:C ratio in the particle phase was about twice the O:C ratio in the gas phase. Average carbon oxidation states of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples OSCSOA were in the range of −0.34 to −0.31, in agreement with expected average carbon oxidation states of fresh SOA (OSC = −0.5–0).
[Hansen2012a] Hansen, M. J., D. Liu, L. Bonne Guldberg, and A. Feilberg, "Application of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry to the assessment of odorant removal in a biological air cleaner for pig production.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 60, no. 10: Department of Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Tjele, Denmark. michaelj.hansen@agrsci.dk, pp. 2599–2606, Mar, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf300182c
Abstract
There is an urgent need to develop odor reduction technologies for animal production facilities, and this requires a reliable measurement technique for estimating the removal of odorants. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the application of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for continuous measurements at a biofilter from SKOV A/S installed at a pig production facility. PTR-MS was able to handle the harsh conditions with high humidity and dust load in a biofilter and provide reliable data for the removal of odorants, including the highly odorous sulfur compounds. The biofilter removed 80-99% of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, phenols, and indoles and ca. 75% of hydrogen sulfide. However, only  0-15% of methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide was removed. In conclusion, PTR-MS is a promising tool that can be used to improve the development of biological air cleaning and other odor reduction technologies toward significant odorants.
[Kohl2012] Kohl, I.., J.. Dunkl, J.. Herbig, M.. Hubalek, H.. Fiegl, and M.. Daniaux, "Atemgasanalyse fuer eine zukuenftige nicht-invasive Medizin", GYNAEKOLOGISCHE ONKOLOGIE, vol. 6, pp. 21, 2012.
Link: http://www.medmedia.at/gyn-aktiv/zukunft-des-brustkrebsscreenings-atemgasanalyse-fur-eine-zukunftige-nicht-invasive-medizin/
Abstract
Die Zusammensetzung der Atemluft kann durch Erkrankungen verändert werden. Mit Hilfe von modernen analytischen Messmethoden versucht die Forschung, Zusammenhänge ­zwischen einzelnen Chemikalien und physiologischen bzw. pathologischen Vorgängen fest­zustellen. Ziel ist die nicht-invasive Frühdiagnostik von Krankheiten durch Atemgasanalysen. In einer Pilotstudie an der Innsbrucker Universitäts-Fraukenklinik wurden Atemgasproben von Brustkrebspatientinnen systematisch mit einer hochempfindlichen Methode analysiert. Eine ­signifikante ­Erniedrigung der Isopren-Konzentration der ausgeatmeten Luft vs. gesunde Kontrollen ist konsistent mit den ­Ergebnissen von Atemgasstudien bei Lungenkrebspatientinnen.
[Krug2012] Krug, S.., G.. Kastenmueller, F.. Stueckler, M.. J. Rist, T.. Skurk, M.. Sailer, J.. Raffler, W.. Roemisch-Margl, J.. Adamski, C.. Prehn, et al., "Atemgasanalyse fuer eine zukuenftige nicht-invasive Medizin", The FASEB Journal, Research Communication, vol. 12, pp. 2607, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.11-198093
Abstract
Metabolic challenge protocols, such as the oral glucose tolerance test, can uncover early alterations in metabolism preceding chronic diseases. Nevertheless, most metabolomics data accessible today reflect the fasting state. To analyze the dynamics of the human metabolome in response to environmental stimuli, we submitted 15 young healthy male volunteers to a highly controlled 4 d challenge protocol, including 36 h fasting, oral glucose and lipid tests, liquid test meals, physical exercise, and cold stress. Blood, urine, exhaled air, and breath condensate samples were analyzed on up to 56 time points by MS- and NMR-based methods, yielding 275 metabolic traits with a focus on lipids and amino acids. Here, we show that physiological challenges increased interindividual variation even in phenotypically similar volunteers, revealing metabotypes not observable in baseline metabolite profiles; volunteer-specific metabolite concentrations were consistently reflected in various biofluids; and readouts from a systematic model of β-oxidation (e.g., acetylcarnitine/palmitylcarnitine ratio) showed significant and stronger associations with physiological parameters (e.g., fat mass) than absolute metabolite concentrations, indicating that systematic models may aid in understanding individual challenge responses. Due to the multitude of analytical methods, challenges and sample types, our freely available metabolomics data set provides a unique reference for future metabolomics studies and for verification of systems biology models.
[Righettoni2012] Righettoni, M., A. Tricoli, S. Gass, A. Schmid, A. Amann, and S. E. Pratsinis, "Breath acetone monitoring by portable Si:WO3 gas sensors.", Anal Chim Acta, vol. 738: Particle Technology Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland., pp. 69–75, Aug, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2012.06.002
Abstract
Breath analysis has the potential for early stage detection and monitoring of illnesses to drastically reduce the corresponding medical diagnostic costs and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. In particular, the detection of acetone in the human breath is promising for non-invasive diagnosis and painless monitoring of diabetes (no finger pricking). Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-deposited and in situ annealed, Si-doped epsilon-WO(3) nanostructured films was developed. The chamber volume was miniaturized while reaction-limited and transport-limited gas flow rates were identified and sensing temperatures were optimized resulting in a low detection limit of acetone (?20ppb) with short response (10-15s) and recovery times (35-70s). Furthermore, the sensor signal (response) was robust against variations of the exhaled breath flow rate facilitating application of these sensors at realistic relative humidities (80-90%) as in the human breath. The acetone content in the breath of test persons was monitored continuously and compared to that of state-of-the-art proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Such portable devices can accurately track breath acetone concentration to become an alternative to more elaborate breath analysis techniques.
[Sinha2012a] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "Constraints on instantaneous ozone production rates and regimes during DOMINO derived using in-situ OH reactivity measurements", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 15: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 7269–7283, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/7269/2012/acp-12-7269-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21/11/2008 to 08/12/2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 s−1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[Trowbridge2012] Trowbridge, A. M., D. Asensio, A. S. D. Eller, D. A. Way, M. J. Wilkinson, J-P. Schnitzler, R. B. Jackson, and R. K. Monson, "Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations.", PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 2: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America. amy.m.trowbridge@gmail.com, pp. e32387, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032387
Abstract
Biogenically released isoprene plays important roles in both tropospheric photochemistry and plant metabolism. We performed a (13)CO(2)-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the kinetics of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Populus x canescens) trees grown and measured at different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. This is the first study to explicitly consider the effects of altered atmospheric CO(2) concentration on carbon partitioning to isoprene biosynthesis. We studied changes in the proportion of labeled carbon as a function of time in two mass fragments, M41(+), which represents, in part, substrate derived from pyruvate, and M69(+), which represents the whole unlabeled isoprene molecule. We observed a trend of slower (13)C incorporation into isoprene carbon derived from pyruvate, consistent with the previously hypothesized origin of chloroplastic pyruvate from cytosolic phosphenolpyruvate (PEP). Trees grown under sub-ambient CO(2) (190 ppmv) had rates of isoprene emission and rates of labeling of M41(+) and M69(+) that were nearly twice those observed in trees grown under elevated CO(2) (590 ppmv). However, they also demonstrated the lowest proportion of completely labeled isoprene molecules. These results suggest that under reduced atmospheric CO(2) availability, more carbon from stored/older carbon sources is involved in isoprene biosynthesis, and this carbon most likely enters the isoprene biosynthesis pathway through the pyruvate substrate. We offer direct evidence that extra-chloroplastic rather than chloroplastic carbon sources are mobilized to increase the availability of pyruvate required to up-regulate the isoprene biosynthesis pathway when trees are grown under sub-ambient CO(2).
[Miekisch2012] Miekisch, W., J. Herbig, and J. K. Schubert, "Data interpretation in breath biomarker research: pitfalls and directions", Journal of Breath Research, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 036007, 2012.
Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854185
[Bamberger2012] Bamberger, I., L. Hoertnagl, T. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, M. Graus, T. Karl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Deposition of terpenes to vegetation-a paradigm shift towards bidirectional VOC exchange?", EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, vol. 14, pp. 7949, 2012.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7949B
Abstract
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are important precursors for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation (Hallquist et al., 2009). In addition reactive BVOCs play a crucial role in local tropospheric ozone production (Atkinson, 2000). According to the present scientific understanding vegetation is recognized as a major VOC emission source rather than a deposition sink. Our recent observations however demonstrate that an uptake of terpene compounds to mountain grassland can be significant - at least under certain atmospheric conditions. After a severe hailstorm volume mixing ratios (VMR) of locally emitted terpene compounds originating from conifers located at the mountain slopes were strongly enhanced, even during daytime hours. Weeks after the hailstorm our PTR-MS and PTR-time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instruments still measured deposition fluxes of monoterpenes (m/z 137.133), sesquiterpenes (m/z 205.195), and oxygenated terpenes (m/z 153.128) to the grassland. The total amount of terpenoids (on a carbon basis) deposited to the grassland during the weeks after the hailstorm is comparable to the total methanol emission of the entire growing season (Bamberger et al., 2011). These findings pose the question whether the terminology should be adjusted from VOC emission to VOC exchange.
[Sulzer2012a] Sulzer, P., S. Juerschik, B. Agarwal, T. Kassebacher, E. Hartungen, A. Edtbauer, F. Petersson, J. Warmer, G. Holl, D. Perry, et al., "Designer Drugs and Trace Explosives Detection with the Help of Very Recent Advancements in Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Future Security: Springer, pp. 366–375, 2012.
Link: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33161-9_55
Abstract
At the "Future Security 2011" we presented an overview of our studies on the "Detection and Identification of Illicit and Hazardous Substances with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)" including first results on explosives, chemical warfare agents and illicit and prescribed drugs detection. Since then we have considerably extended these preliminary studies to the detection of defined traces of some of the most common explosives, namely TNT, PETN, TATP, and DATP deposited into aluminum foam bodies, and to the detection of a number of novel and widely unknown designer drugs: ethylphenidate, 4-fluoroamphetamine and dimethocaine. Moreover, we have dramatically improved our time-of-flight based PTR-MS instruments by substantially increasing their sensitivity and hence lowering the detection limit, making them even more suitable and applicable to threat agents with extremely low vapour pressures. Data from measurements on certified gas standards are presented in order to underline these statements. The data demonstrate that, in comparison to the first generation instruments, a gain of one order of magnitude in terms of sensitivity and detection limit has been obtained.
[Schuhfried2012] Schuhfried, E., E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, C. Soukoulis, R. Viola, T. D. Maerk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Desorption kinetics with PTR-MS: Isothermal differential desorption kinetics from a heterogeneous inlet surface at ambient pressure and a new concept for compound identification", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. -: Elsevier, pp. -, 2012.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380612000292
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a soft ionization mass spectrometric technique for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a very low limit of detection (LOD) (parts per trillion by volume) and excellent time resolution (split seconds). This makes PTR-MS a particularly interesting instrument for investigating surface desorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under realistic conditions, i.e., at ambient pressure from a heterogeneous surface. Here, we report on the investigation of heterogeneous inlet surface kinetics with PTR-MS and based thereon, develop concepts to assist compound identification in PTR-MS. First, we studied differential isothermal desorption kinetics using heterogeneous inlet surface data measured by Mikoviny et al. [7] with their newly developed high-temp-PTR-MS. The best fit to their data is obtained with bimodal pseudo-first order kinetics. In addition, we explored the normalization of the data and calculated data points of the desorption isotherms. We found evidence that the interesting part of the isotherm can be linearized in a double log plot. Then we investigated the idea to use memory effects of the inlet system to assist compound identification. At the moment, the main problem is the dependence of the kinetics on the initial equilibrium gas phase adsorption concentration, and thus, the surface coverage. As a solution, we suggest an empirical, quasi-concentration independent, yet compound specific parameter: the normalized desorption time tnd describing the decline of the signal to 1/e2 of the initial concentration, normalized to an initial concentration of 10,000 counts per second (cps). Furthermore, we investigated property–property and structure–property relationships of this new parameter. Further possible improvements are discussed as well.
[Kassebacher2012] Kassebacher, T., P. Sulzer, S. Juerschik, B. Agarwal, F. Petersson, E. Hartungen, H. Seehauser, and T. D. Maerk, "Detecting and Quantifying Toxic Industrial Compounds (TICs) with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Future Security: Springer, pp. 438–447, 2012.
Link: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33161-9_62
Abstract
In the course of the FP7-SEC project "SPIRIT" (Safety and Protection of built Infrastructure to Resist Integral Threats) we focused our research with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on C-agents, specifically Toxic Industrial Compounds (TICs). Most TICs are readily available and represent a considerable threat when used in terroristic attacks. We show the principal procedure of PTR-MS detection measurements on two chemicals, namely phosgene and chloroacetone. With studies of the former we want to point out principle differences between measurements on a quadrupole mass filter based and a Time-of-Flight-based PTR-MS instrument and point out the respective benefits and drawbacks. For the latter we present the results of a diluted headspace measurement and illustrate the connection with security standards in buildings.
[Zehm2012] Zehm, S., S. Schweinitz, R. Wuerzner, H. Peter Colvin, and J. Rieder, "Detection of Candida albicans by mass spectrometric fingerprinting.", Curr Microbiol, vol. 64, no. 3: Department of Vascular Surgery, Innsbruck University Hospital, Anichstrasse 35, Innsbruck, Austria. sarah.zehm@gmail.com, pp. 271–275, Mar, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-011-0064-5
Abstract
<p>Candida albicans is one of the most frequent causes of fungal infections in humans. Significant correlation between candiduria and invasive candidiasis has previously been described. The existing diagnostic methods are often time-consuming, cost-intensive and lack in sensitivity and specificity. In this study, the profile of low-molecular weight volatile compounds in the headspace of C. albicans-urine suspensions of four different fungal cell concentrations compared to nutrient media and urine without C. albicans was determined using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). At fungal counts of 1.5 x 10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/ml signals at 45, 47 and 73 atomic mass units (amu) highly significantly increased. At fungal counts of &lt;1.5 x 10(5) CFU/ml signals at 47 and 73 amu also increased, but only at 45 amu a statistically significant increase was seen. Time course alterations of signal intensities dependent on different cell concentrations and after addition of Sabouraud nutrient solution were analysed. Recommendations for measurement conditions are given. Our study is the first to describe headspace profiling of C. albicans-urine suspensions of different fungal cell concentrations. PTR-MS represents a promising approach to rapid, highly sensitive and non-invasive clinical diagnostics allowing qualitative and quantitative analysis.</p>
[Agarwal2012] Agarwal, B.., S.. Juerschik, P.. Sulzer, F.. Petersson, S.. Jaksch, A.. Jordan, and T.. D. Maerk, "Detection of isocyanates and polychlorinated biphenyls using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 26, no. 8: Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 983–989, Apr, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.6173
Abstract
Isocyanates are highly reactive species widely used in industry. They can cause irritation of the eyes, trigger asthma, etc. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were widely used in electrical equipments like capacitors and transformers in the last century and are still present in the environment today. PCBs are known to cause cancer and to affect the immune, reproductive, nervous and endocrine systems. Therefore, there is a need for a simple, rapid and reliable analytical method for the detection of traces of isocyanates and of PCBs.The data presented in this paper were obtained using a proton transfer reaction (PTR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high sensitivity PTR quadrupole mass spectrometer. We also utilized a recently developed direct aqueous injection (DAI) inlet system for proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments that allows the analysis of trace compounds in liquids.We detected four isocyanates in the headspace above small sample quantities and investigated their fragmentation pathways to obtain a fundamental understanding of the processes involved in proton transfer reactions and also to determine the best operating conditions of the PTR-MS instruments. In addition, nine PCBs were unambiguously identified via their exact mass and isotopic distribution and detected in different concentration levels via direct injection of the liquid.Utilizing recent developments and improvements in PTR-MS, we can rapidly detect two important environmental pollutant compound classes (isocyanates and PCBs) at high accuracy and without any sample preparation. In this paper, we provide proof of the detection of traces of isocyanates and PCBs in air and also of PCBs in liquids. These results could be used for the development of a real-time monitoring device for industrial waste, polluted air or water quality surveillance.
[Knighton2012] W Knighton, B., S. C. Herndon, J. F. Franklin, E. C. Wood, J. Wormhoudt, W. Brooks, E. C. Fortner, and D. T. Allen, "Direct measurement of volatile organic compound emissions from industrial flares using real-time online techniques: Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectroscopy", Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, vol. 51, no. 39: ACS Publications, pp. 12674–12684, 2012.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ie202695v
Abstract
During the 2010 Comprehensive Flare Study a suite of analytical instrumentation was employed to monitor and quantify in real-time the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions emanating from an industrial chemical process flare burning either propene/natural gas or propane/natural gas. To our knowledge this represents the first time the VOC composition has been directly measured as a function of flare efficiency on an operational full-scale flare. This compositional information was obtained using a suite of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) and quantum cascade laser tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometers (QCL-TILDAS) to measure the unburned fuel and associated combustion byproducts. Methane, ethyne, ethene, and formaldehyde were measured using the QC-TILDAS. Propene, acetaldehyde, methanol, benzene, acrolein, and the sum of the C3H6O isomers were measured with the PTR-MS. A second PTR-MS equipped with a gas chromatograph (GC) was operated in parallel and was used to verify the identity of the neutral components that were responsible for producing the ions monitored with the first PTR-MS. Additional components including 1,3-butadiene and C3H4 (propyne or allene) were identified using the GC/PTR-MS. The propene concentrations derived from the PTR-MS were found to agree with measurements made using a conventional GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). The VOC product (excludes fuel components) speciation profile is more dependent on fuel composition, propene versus propane, than on flare type, air-assisted versus steam-assisted, and is essentially constant with respect to combustion efficiency for combustion efficiencies >0.8. Propane flares produce more alkenes with ethene and propene accounting for approximately 80% (per carbon basis) of the VOC combustion product. The propene partial combustion product profile was observed to contain relatively more oxygenated material where formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are major contributors and account for 20 - 25% of VOC product carbon. Steam-assisted flares produce less ethyne and benzene than air-assisted flares. This observation is consistent with the understanding that steam assisted flares are more efficient at reducing soot, which is formed via the same reaction mechanisms that form benzene and ethyne.
[1512] Park, J.-H.., A.. H. Goldstein, J.. Timkovsky, S.. Fares, R.. Weber, J.. Karlik, and R.. Holzinger, "Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-{MS}): comparison with PTR-{MS} measured vertical gradients and fluxes", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, pp. 20435–20482, Aug, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acpd-12-20435-2012
Abstract
<p>During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a standard proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m Δ m&minus;1) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e. co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7.1 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), and m/z 69.071 (isoprene + 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol, 1.8%, 5.3 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). Low levels of emission and/or deposition (&lt;1.6% for each, 5.8% in total flux) were observed for the additional reported masses. Overall, our results show that EC flux measurements using PTR-TOF-MS is a powerful new tool for characterizing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange including both emission and deposition for a large range of BVOC and their oxidation products.</p>
[Hansen2012c] Hansen, M. J., A. P. S. Adamsen, K. E. N. Jonassen, and A. Feilberg, "The effect of pit ventilation on the emission of odorants from pig production", CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, vol. 30, 2012.
Link: http://www.aidic.it/cet/12/30/039.pdf
[Hansen2012] Hansen, M. J. Ã. ¸rgen, K. Toda, T. Obata, A. Peter S. Adamsen, and A. Feilberg, "Evaluation of single column trapping/separation and chemiluminescence detection for measurement of methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide from pig production.", J Anal Methods Chem, vol. 2012: Department of Engineering, Science and Technology, Aarhus University, Blichers Allé 20, 8830 Tjele, Denmark., pp. 489239, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/489239
Abstract
Reduced sulfur compounds are considered to be important odorants from pig production due to their low odor threshold values and low solubility in slurry. The objective of the present study was to investigate the use of a portable method with a single silica gel column for trapping/separation coupled with chemiluminescence detection (SCTS-CL) for measurement of methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in sample air from pig production. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to evaluate the trapping/separation. The silica gel column used for the SCTS-CL efficiently collected hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide. The measurement of methanethiol by SCTS-CL was clearly interfered by the high concentration of hydrogen sulfide found in pig production, and a removal of hydrogen sulfide was necessary to obtain reliable results. Air samples taken from a facility with growing-finishing pigs were analyzed by SCTS-CL, PTR-MS, and a gas chromatograph with sulfur chemiluminescence detection (GC-SCD) to evaluate the SCTS-CL. The difference between the concentrations of methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide measured with SCTS-CL, PTR-MS, and GC-SCD was below 10%. In conclusion, the SCTS-CL is a portable and low-cost alternative to the commercial methods that can be used to measure methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in sample air from pig production.
[Aaltonen2012] Aaltonen, H., and , "Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor", : Helsingin yliopisto, 2012.
Link: https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/37593
Abstract
Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in chemical reactions in the atmosphere and thus also affect Earth s radiation balance. In this study, chamber and snow gradient techniques for measuring boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. This study reveals that VOCs from soil are emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not correlate with the VOC fluxes. Our results show that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor accounts for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This can be utilized in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment.
[Tasin2012] Tasin, M., L. Cappellin, and F. Biasioli, "Fast direct injection mass-spectrometric characterization of stimuli for insect electrophysiology by proton transfer reaction-time of flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS).", Sensors (Basel), vol. 12, no. 4: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy. marco.tasin@slu.se, pp. 4091–4104, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s120404091
Abstract
Electrophysiological techniques are used in insect neuroscience to measure the response of olfactory neurons to volatile odour stimuli. Widely used systems to deliver an olfactory stimulus to a test insect include airstream guided flow through glass cartridges loaded with a given volatile compound on a sorbent support. Precise measurement of the quantity of compound reaching the sensory organ of the test organism is an urgent task in insect electrophysiology. In this study we evaluated the performances of the recent realised proton transfer reaction-time of flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) as a fast and selective gas sensor. In particular, we characterised the gas emission from cartridges loaded with a set of volatile compounds belonging to different chemical classes and commonly used in electrophysiological experiments. PTR-ToF-MS allowed a fast monitoring of all investigated compounds with sufficient sensitivity and time resolution. The detection and the quantification of air contaminants and solvent or synthetic standards impurities allowed a precise quantification of the stimulus exiting the cartridge. The outcome of this study was twofold: on one hand we showed that PTR-ToF-MS allows monitoring fast processes with high sensitivity by real time detection of a broad number of compounds; on the other hand we provided a tool to solve an important issue in insect electrophysiology.
[Sulzer2012c] Sulzer, P., A. Edtbauer, E. Hartungen, S. Juerschik, A. Jordan, G. Hanel, S. Feil, S. Jaksch, L. Märk, and T. D. Märk, "From conventional proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to universal trace gas analysis", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 321: Elsevier, pp. 66–70, 2012.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380612001704
Abstract
We present here a slightly modified PTR-MS instrument that is not only capable to ionize trace compounds in air via proton-transfer-reactions (PTR) but is also able to ionize via charge-transfer-reactions (CTR) with help of reagent ions (Kr+ in particular) possessing higher ionization energies than common air constituents. This means that with minor adaptations a common PTR-MS instrument can be used for the analysis of nearly all available substance classes by using both PTR and/or CTR ionization. Especially in environmental research, the field of application where PTR-MS is used most widely, now not only trace volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, etc.) but additionally also very important (inorganic) substances, such as CO, CO2, CH4, NOx, and SO2, can be detected and quantified with the same instrument. As all ionizing agents are produced in a hollow cathode discharge ion source with good purity no additional mass filter is needed for reagent ion selection (as in other analytical methods employed) and remaining reagent ion impurities can be clearly distinguished from isobaric sample compounds due to the high mass resolution of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer used in the present PTR-MS instrument (PTR-TOF 8000). We present data obtained with various gas standards ranging from a “classical” PTR-MS aromatics mixture to samples containing molecules possessing ionization energies all the way up to 14 eV (CO).
[Jardine2012] Jardine, K.., G.. A. Barron-Gafford, J.. P. Norman, L.. Abrell, R.. K. Monson, K.. T. Meyers, M.. Pavao-Zuckerman, K.. Dontsova, E.. Kleist, C.. Werner, et al., "Green leaf volatiles and oxygenated metabolite emission bursts from mesquite branches following light-dark transitions.", Photosynth Res, vol. 113, no. 1-3: The University of Arizona-Biosphere 2, P.O. Box 8746, Tucson, AZ 85738, USA. jardine@email.arizona.edu, pp. 321–333, Sep, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11120-012-9746-5
Abstract
Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetaldehyde bursts were hypothesized to be due to the 'pyruvate overflow' mechanism. In this study, branch emissions of GLVs and a group of oxygenated metabolites (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetic acid, and acetone) derived from the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) bypass pathway were quantified from mesquite plants following light-dark transitions using a coupled GC-MS, PTR-MS, and photosynthesis system. Within the first minute after darkening following a light period, large emission bursts of both C(5) and C(6) GLVs dominated by (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate together with the PDH bypass metabolites are reported for the first time. We found that branches exposed to CO(2)-free air lacked significant GLV and PDH bypass bursts while O(2)-free atmospheres eliminated the GLV burst but stimulated the PDH bypass burst. A positive relationship was observed between photosynthetic activity prior to darkening and the magnitude of the GLV and PDH bursts. Photosynthesis under (13)CO(2) resulted in bursts with extensive labeling of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and the acetate but not the C(6)-alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate. Our observations are consistent with (1) the "pyruvate overflow" mechanism with a fast turnover time (<1 h) as part of the PDH bypass pathway, which may contribute to the acetyl-CoA used for the acetate moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate, and (2) a pool of fatty acids with a slow turnover time (>3 h) responsible for the C(6) alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate via the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. We conclude that our non-invasive method may provide a new valuable in vivo tool for studies of acetyl-CoA and fatty acid metabolism in plants at a variety of spatial scales.
[Halbritter2012] Halbritter, S.., M.. Fedrigo, V.. Hoellriegl, W.. Szymczak, J.. M. Maier, A.. Ziegler, and M.. Hummel, "Human Breath Gas Analysis in the Screening of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus", DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, vol. 14, pp. 10, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/dia.2012.0076
Abstract
{Background: We present a pilot study on the feasibility of the application and advantages of online, noninvasive breath gas analysis (BGA) by proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry for the screening of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in 52 pregnant women by means of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Subjects and Methods: We collected and identified samples of end-tidal breath gas from patients during OGTT. Time evolution parameters of challenge-responsive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human breath gas were estimated. Multivariate analysis of variance and permutation analysis were used to assess feasibility of BGA as a diagnostic tool for GDM. Results: Standard OGTT diagnosis identified pregnant women as having GDM (n = 8), impaired glucose tolerance (n = 12), and normal glucose tolerance (n = 32); a part of this latter group was further subdivided into a ''marginal'' group (n = 9) because of a marginal high 1-h or 2-h OGTT value. We observed that OGTT diagnosis (four metabolic groups) could be mapped into breath gas data. The time evolution of oxidation products of glucose and lipids, acetone metabolites, and thiols in breath gas after a glucose challenge was correlated with GDM diagnosis (P = 0.035). Furthermore, basal (fasting) values of dimethyl sulfide and values of methanol in breath gas were inversely correlated with phenotype characteristics such as homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (R= -0.538; P = 0.0002
[Luchner2012] Luchner, M., R. Gutmann, K. Bayer, J. Dunkl, A. Hansel, J. Herbig, W. Singer, F. Strobl, K. Winkler, and G. Striedner, "Implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for advanced bioprocess monitoring.", Biotechnol Bioeng, vol. 109, no. 12: ACIB GmbH, Muthgasse 11, A-1190 Vienna, Austria., pp. 3059–3069, Dec, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.24579
Abstract
We report on the implementation of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technology for on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the off-gas of bioreactors. The main part of the work was focused on the development of an interface between the bioreactor and an analyzer suitable for continuous sampling of VOCs emanating from the bioprocess. The permanently heated sampling line with an inert surface avoids condensation and interaction of volatiles during transfer to the PTR-MS. The interface is equipped with a sterile sinter filter unit directly connected to the bioreactor headspace, a condensate trap, and a series of valves allowing for dilution of the headspace gas, in-process calibration, and multiport operation. To assess the aptitude of the entire system, a case study was conducted comprising three identical cultivations with a recombinant E. coli strain, and the volatiles produced in the course of the experiments were monitored with the PTR-MS. The high reproducibility of the measurements proved that the established sampling interface allows for reproducible transfer of volatiles from the headspace to the PTR-MS analyzer. The set of volatile compounds monitored comprises metabolites of different pathways with diverse functions in cell physiology but also volatiles from the process matrix. The trends of individual compounds showed diverse patterns. The recorded signal levels covered a dynamic range of more than five orders of magnitude. It was possible to assign specific volatile compounds to distinctive events in the bioprocess. The presented results clearly show that PTR-MS was successfully implemented as a powerful bioprocess-monitoring tool and that access to volatiles emitted by the cells opens promising perspectives in terms of advanced process control.
[JLTing2012] Ting, V. J. L., C. Soukoulis, P. Silcock, L. Cappellin, A. Romano, E. Aprea, P. J. Bremer, T. D. Märk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "In Vitro and In Vivo Flavor Release from Intact and Fresh-Cut Apple in Relation with Genetic, Textural, and Physicochemical Parameters", Journal of food science, vol. 77, no. 11: Wiley Online Library, pp. C1226–C1233, 2012.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02947.x/full
Abstract
Flavor release from 6 commercial apple cultivars (Fuji, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Morgen Dallago, and Red Delicious) under static conditions (intact or fresh-cut samples) and during consumption of fresh-cut samples (nosespace) was determined by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Textural (firmness, fracturability, flesh elasticity, and rupture) and physicochemical (pH, acidity, and water content) properties of the apples were also measured. Static headspace analysis of intact fruits revealed Fuji and Granny Smith apples had the lowest concentration for all measured flavor compounds (esters, aldehydes, alcohols, and terpenes), whereas Red Delicious apples had the highest. Fresh-cut samples generally showed a significant increase in total volatile compounds with acetaldehyde being most abundant. However, compared to intact fruits, cut Golden and Red Delicious apples had a lower intensity for ester related peaks. Five parameters were extracted from the nosespace data of peaks related to esters (m/z 43, 61), acetaldehyde (m/z 45), and ethanol (m/z 47): 2 associated with mastication (duration of mastication–tcon; time required for first swallowing event–tswal), and 3 related with in-nose volatile compound concentration (area under the curve–AUC; maximum intensity–Imax; time for achieving Imax–tmax). Three different behaviors were identified in the nosespace data: a) firm samples with low AUC and tswal values (Granny Smith, Fuji), b) mealy samples with high AUC, Imax, tswal values, and low tcon (Morgen Dallago, Golden Delicious), and c) firm samples with high AUC and Imax values (Red Delicious). Strengths and limitations of the methodology are discussed.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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