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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 59 results
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[Zini2005] Zini, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, D. Mott, E. Aprea, T. D. Maerk, A. Patocchi, C. Gessler, and M. Komjanc, "QTL mapping of volatile compounds in ripe apples detected by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry", Euphytica, vol. 145, no. 3: Springer, pp. 269–279, 2005.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/7353036TQ1852282.pdf
Abstract
The availability of genetic linkage maps enables the detection and analysis of QTLs contributing to quality traits of the genotype. Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), a relatively novel spectrometric technique, has been applied to measure the headspace composition of the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted by apple fruit genotypes of the progeny ‘Fiesta’ × ‘Discovery’. Fruit samples were characterised by their PTR-MS spectra normalised to total area. QTL analysis for all PTR-MS peaks was carried out and 10 genomic regions associated with the peaks at m/z = 28, 43, 57, 61, 103, 115 and 145 were identified (LOD > 2.5). We show that it is possible to find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to PTR-MS characterisation of the headspace composition of single whole apple fruits indicating the presence of a link between molecular characterisation and PTR-MS data. We provide tentative information on the metabolites related to the detected QTLs based on available chemical information. A relation between apple skin colour and peaks related to carbonyl compounds was established.
[Cappellin2012a] Cappellin, L., T. Karl, M. Probst, O. Ismailova, P. M. Winkler, C. Soukoulis, E. Aprea, T. D. Maerk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "On quantitative determination of volatile organic compound concentrations using proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 46, no. 4: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Area, Via E. Mach, 1, 38010, S. Michele a/A, Italy., pp. 2283–2290, Feb, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es203985t
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has become a reference technique in environmental science allowing for VOC monitoring with low detection limits. The recent introduction of time-of-flight mass analyzer (PTR-ToF-MS) opens new horizons in terms of mass resolution, acquisition time, and mass range. A standard procedure to perform quantitative VOC measurements with PTR-ToF-MS is to calibrate the instrument using a standard gas. However, given the number of compounds that can be simultaneously monitored by PTR-ToF-MS, such a procedure could become impractical, especially when standards are not readily available. In the present work we show that, under particular conditions, VOC concentration determinations based only on theoretical predictions yield good accuracy. We investigate a range of humidity and operating conditions and show that theoretical VOC concentration estimations are accurate when the effect of water cluster ions is negligible. We also show that PTR-ToF-MS can successfully be used to estimate reaction rate coefficients between H(3)O(+) and VOC at PTR-MS working conditions and find good agreement with the corresponding nonthermal theoretical predictions. We provide a tabulation of theoretical rate coefficients for a number of relevant volatile organic compounds at various energetic conditions and test the approach in a laboratory study investigating the oxidation of alpha-pinene.
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[Granitto2007] Granitto, P. M., F. Biasioli, E. Aprea, D. Mott, C. Furlanello, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Rapid and non-destructive identification of strawberry cultivars by direct PTR-MS headspace analysis and data mining techniques", Sensors and actuators B: Chemical, vol. 121, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 379–385, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925400506002577
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a spectrometric technique that allows direct injection and analysis of mixtures of volatile compounds. Its coupling with data mining techniques provides a reliable and fast method for the automatic characterization of agroindustrial products. We test the validity of this approach to identify samples of strawberry cultivars by measurements of single intact fruits. The samples used were collected over 3 years and harvested in different locations. Three data mining techniques (random forests, penalized discriminant analysis and discriminant partial least squares) have been applied to the full PTR-MS spectra without any preliminary projection or feature selection. We tested the classification models in three different ways (leave-one-out and leave-group-out internal cross validation, and leaving a full year aside), thereby demonstrating that strawberry cultivars can be identified by rapid non-destructive measurements of single fruits. Performances of the different classification methods are compared.
[Morisco2013] Morisco, F., E. Aprea, V. Lembo, V. Fogliano, P. Vitaglione, G. Mazzone, L. Cappellin, F. Gasperi, S. Masone, G. Domenico { De Palma}, et al., "Rapid "breath-print" of liver cirrhosis by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A pilot study.", PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 4: Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. filomena.morisco@unina.it, pp. e59658, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0059658
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to test the potential of Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and the assessment of disease severity by direct analysis of exhaled breath. Twenty-six volunteers have been enrolled in this study: 12 patients (M/F 8/4, mean age 70.5 years, min-max 42-80 years) with liver cirrhosis of different etiologies and at different severity of disease and 14 healthy subjects (M/F 5/9, mean age 52.3 years, min-max 35-77 years). Real time breath analysis was performed on fasting subjects using a buffered end-tidal on-line sampler directly coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS. Twelve volatile organic compounds (VOCs) resulted significantly differently in cirrhotic patients (CP) compared to healthy controls (CTRL): four ketones (2-butanone, 2- or 3- pentanone, C8-ketone, C9-ketone), two terpenes (monoterpene, monoterpene related), four sulphur or nitrogen compounds (sulfoxide-compound, S-compound, NS-compound, N-compound) and two alcohols (heptadienol, methanol). Seven VOCs (2-butanone, C8-ketone, a monoterpene, 2,4-heptadienol and three compounds containing N, S or NS) resulted significantly differently in compensate cirrhotic patients (Child-Pugh A; CP-A) and decompensated cirrhotic subjects (Child-Pugh B+C; CP-B+C). ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis was performed considering three contrast groups: CP vs CTRL, CP-A vs CTRL and CP-A vs CP-B+C. In these comparisons monoterpene and N-compound showed the best diagnostic performance.Breath analysis by PTR-ToF-MS was able to distinguish cirrhotic patients from healthy subjects and to discriminate those with well compensated liver disease from those at more advanced severity stage. A breath-print of liver cirrhosis was assessed for the first time.
[DelPulgar2011] Del Pulgar}, Jé. Sánchez {, C. Soukoulis, F. Biasioli, L. Cappellin, C. García, F. Gasperi, P. Granitto, T. D. Maerk, E. Piasentier, and E. Schuhfried, "Rapid characterization of dry cured ham produced following different PDOs by proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS).", Talanta, vol. 85, no. 1: Food Technology, Facultad de Veterinaria, UEx, Campus Universitario s/n, 10003 Cáceres, Spain., pp. 386–393, Jul, 2011.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2011.03.077
Abstract
In the present study, the recently developed proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) technique was used for the rapid characterization of dry cured hams produced according to 4 of the most important Protected Designations of Origin (PDOs): an Iberian one (Dehesa de Extremadura) and three Italian ones (Prosciutto di San Daniele, Prosciutto di Parma and Prosciutto Toscano). In total, the headspace composition and respective concentration for nine Spanish and 37 Italian dry cured ham samples were analyzed by direct injection without any pre-treatment or pre-concentration. Firstly, we show that the rapid PTR-ToF-MS fingerprinting in conjunction with chemometrics (Principal Components Analysis) indicates a good separation of the dry cured ham samples according to their production process and that it is possible to set up, using data mining methods, classification models with a high success rate in cross validation. Secondly, we exploited the higher mass resolution of the new PTR-ToF-MS, as compared with standard quadrupole based versions, for the identification of the exact sum formula of the mass spectrometric peaks providing analytical information on the observed differences. The work indicates that PTR-ToF-MS can be used as a rapid method for the identification of differences among dry cured hams produced following the indications of different PDOs and that it provides information on some of the major volatile compounds and their link with the implemented manufacturing practices such as rearing system, salting and curing process, manufacturing practices that seem to strongly affect the final volatile organic profile and thus the perceived quality of dry cured ham.
[Aprea2007b] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, G. Versini, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Rapid white truffle headspace analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and comparison with solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 21, no. 16: IASMA Research Center, Agri-Food Quality Department, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige (TN), Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 2564–2572, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.3118
Abstract
The gastronomic relevance and high price of white truffle are related mainly to its unique aroma. Here we evaluate, for the first time, the possibility of characterizing in a rapid and non-destructive way the aroma of white truffles based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We indicate that anonymous PTR-MS fingerprinting allows sample classification and we also compare qualitatively and quantitatively PTR-MS data with measurements made by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC) of the same samples under the same conditions. PTR-MS fragmentation data of truffle-relevant compounds are also published here for the first time. Most of the sulfur-containing compounds detected by GC and relevant for white truffle aroma have a high positive correlation with single PTR-MS peaks. Our work indicates that, after preliminary comparison with GC data, PTR-MS is a new tool for the rapid, quantitative and non-invasive characterization of white truffle by direct headspace injection without any pre-concentration.
[Granitto2006] Granitto, P. M., C. Furlanello, F. Biasioli, and F. Gasperi, "Recursive feature elimination with random forest for PTR-MS analysis of agroindustrial products", Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, vol. 83, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 83–90, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169743906000232
Abstract
In this paper we apply the recently introduced Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) algorithm to the identification of relevant features in the spectra produced by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) analysis of agroindustrial products. The method is compared with the more traditional Support Vector Machine-Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE), extended to allow multiclass problems, and with a baseline method based on the Kruskal–Wallis statistic (KWS). In particular, we apply all selection methods to the discrimination of nine varieties of strawberries and six varieties of typical cheeses from Trentino Province, North Italy. Using replicated experiments we estimate unbiased generalization errors. Our results show that RF-RFE outperforms SVM-RFE and KWS on the task of finding small subsets of features with high discrimination levels on PTR-MS data sets. We also show how selection probabilities and features co-occurrence can be used to highlight the most relevant features for discrimination.
S
[Schuhfried2013] Schuhfried, E., M. Probst, J. Limtrakul, S. Wannakao, E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, T. D. Märk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Sulfides: chemical ionization induced fragmentation studied with proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and density functional calculations.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 48, no. 3: Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 367–378, Mar, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3153
Abstract
We report the energy-dependent fragmentation patterns upon protonation of eight sulfides (organosulfur compounds) in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Studies were carried out, both, experimentally with PTR-MS, and with theoretical quantum-chemical methods. Charge retention usually occurred at the sulfur-containing fragment for short chain sulfides. An exception to this is found in the unsaturated monosulfide allylmethyl sulfide (AMS), which preferentially fragmented to a carbo-cation at m/z 41, C3H5(+). Quantum chemical calculations (DFT with the M062X functional 6-31G(d,p) basis sets) for the fragmentation reaction pathways of AMS indicated that the most stable protonated AMS cation at m/z 89 is a protonated (cyclic) thiirane, and that the fragmentation reaction pathways of AMS in the drift tube are kinetically controlled. The protonated parent ion MH(+) is the predominant product in PTR-MS, except for diethyl disulfide at high collisional energies. The saturated monosulfides R-S-R' (with R<R') have little or no fragmentation, at the same time the most abundant fragment ion is the smaller R-S(+) fragment. The saturated disulfides R-S-S-R display more fragmentation than the saturated monosulfides, the most common fragments are disulfide containing fragments or long-chain carbo-cations. The results rationalize fragmentation data for saturated monosulfides and disulfides and represent a detailed analysis of the fragmentation of an unsaturated sulfide. Apart from the theoretical interest, the results are in support of the quantitative analysis of sulfides with PTR-MS, all the more so as PTR-MS is one of a few techniques that allow for ultra-low quantitative analysis of sulfides.
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[1706] Aprea, E., A. Romano, E. Betta, F. Biasioli, L. Cappellin, M. Fanti, and F. Gasperi, "Volatile compound changes during shelf life of dried Boletus edulis: comparison between SPME-GC-MS and PTR-ToF-MS analysis.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 50, pp. 56–64, Jan, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3469
Abstract
<p>Drying process is commonly used to allow long time storage of valuable porcini mushrooms (Boletus edulis). Although considered a stable product dried porcini flavour changes during storage. Monitoring of volatile compounds during shelf life may help to understand the nature of the observed changes. In the present work two mass spectrometric techniques were used to monitor the evolution of volatile compounds during commercial shelf life of dried porcini. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) allowed the identification of 66 volatile compounds, 36 of which reported for the first time, monitored during the commercial shelf life of dried porcini. Proton transfer reaction - time of flight - mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) , a direct injection mass spectrometric technique, was shown to be a fast and sensitive instrument for the general monitoring of volatile compound evolution during storage of dried porcini. Furthermore, PTR-ToF-MS grants access to compounds whose determination would otherwise require lengthy pre-concentration and/or derivatization steps such as ammonia and small volatile amines. The two techniques, both used for the first time to study dried porcini, provided detailed description of time evolution of volatile compounds during shelf life. Alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and monoterpenes diminish during the storage while carboxylic acids, pyrazines, lactones and amines increase. The storage temperature modifies the rate of the observed changes influencing the final quality of the dried porcini. We showed the advantages of both techniques, suggesting a strategy to be adopted to follow time evolution of volatile compounds in food products during shelf life, based on the identification of compounds by GC-MS and the rapid time monitoring by PTR-ToF-MS measurements in order to maximize the advantages of both techniques.</p>

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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