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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 775 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
2013
[Pleil2013] Pleil, J. D., W. Miekisch, T. H. Risby, M. C. Madden, and J. R. Sobus, "Meeting reports for 2013: recent advances in breath biomarker research", Journal of breath research, vol. 7, no. 2: IOP Publishing, pp. 029001, 2013.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/1752-7163/7/2/029001
[1457] Beale, R., J. L. Dixon, S. R. Arnold, P. S. Liss, and P. D. Nightingale, "Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean", Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, vol. 118, pp. 5412–5425, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jgrc.20322
Abstract
<p>Oceanic methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone concentrations were measured during an Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) cruise from the UK to Chile (49&deg;N to 39&deg;S) in 2009. Methanol (48&ndash;361 nM) and acetone (2&ndash;24 nM) varied over the track with enrichment in the oligotrophic Northern Atlantic Gyre. Acetaldehyde showed less variability (3&ndash;9 nM) over the full extent of the transect. These oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were also measured subsurface, with methanol and acetaldehyde mostly showing homogeneity throughout the water column. Acetone displayed a reduction below the mixed layer. OVOC concentrations did not consistently correlate with primary production or chlorophyll-a levels in the surface Atlantic Ocean. However, we did find a novel and significant negative relationship between acetone concentration and bacterial leucine incorporation, suggesting that acetone might be removed by marine bacteria as a source of carbon. Microbial turnover of both acetone and acetaldehyde was confirmed. Modeled atmospheric data are used to estimate the likely air-side OVOC concentrations. The direction and magnitude of air-sea fluxes vary for all three OVOCs depending on location. We present evidence that the ocean may exhibit regions of acetaldehyde under-saturation. Extrapolation suggests that the Atlantic Ocean represents an overall source of these OVOCs to the atmosphere at 3, 3, and 1 Tg yr&minus;1 for methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone, respectively.</p>
[Fischer2013] Fischer, L., V. Ruzsanyi, K. Winkler, R. Gutmann, A. Hansel, and J. Herbig, "Micro-Capillary-Column PTR-TOF", 6th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 162, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Tsevdou2013] Tsevdou, M., C. Soukoulis, L. Cappellin, F. Gasperi, P. S. Taoukis, and F. Biasioli, "Monitoring the effect of high pressure and transglutaminase treatment of milk on the evolution of flavour compounds during lactic acid fermentation using PTR-ToF-MS.", Food Chem, vol. 138, no. 4: Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Polytechnioupoli Zografou, Zografou 15780, Athens, Greece., pp. 2159–2167, Jun, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.12.007
Abstract
In this study, the effects of thermal or high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment of a milk base in the absence or presence of a transglutaminase (TGase) protein cross-linking step on the flavour development of yoghurt were investigated. The presence of several tentatively identified volatile flavour compounds (VOCs), both during the enzymatic treatment and the lactic acid fermentation of the milk base, were monitored using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). The formation of the major flavour compounds (acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin, and 2-butanone) followed a sigmoidal trend described by the modified Gompertz model. The HHP treatment of milk increased significantly the volatile compound formation rate whereas it did not affect the duration of the lag phase of formation, with the exception of acetaldehyde and diacetyl formation. On the contrary, the TGase cross-linking of milk did not significantly modify the formation rate of the volatile compounds but shortened the duration of the lag phase of their formation.
[1445] Ruzsanyi, V., L. Fischer, J. Herbig, C. Ager, and A. Amann, "Multi-capillary-column proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.", J Chromatogr A, vol. 1316, pp. 112–118, Nov, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2013.09.072
Abstract
<p>Proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) exhibits high selectivity with a resolution of around 5000m/Δm. While isobars can be separated with this resolution, discrimination of isomeric compounds is usually not possible. The coupling of a multi-capillary column (MCC) with a PTR-TOFMS overcomes these problems as demonstrated in this paper for the ketone isomers 3-heptanone and 2-methyl-3-hexanone and for different aldehydes. Moreover, fragmentation of compounds can be studied in detail which might even improve the identification. LODs for compounds tested are in the range of low ppbv and peak positions of the respective separated substances show good repeatability (RSD of the peak positions &lt;3.2%). Due to its special characteristics, such as isothermal operation, compact size, the MCC setup is suitable to be installed inside the instrument and the overall retention time for a complete spectrum is only a few minutes: this allows near real-time measurements in the optional MCC mode. In contrast to other methods that yield additional separation, such as the use of pre-cursor ions other than H3O(+), this method yields additional information without increasing complexity.</p>
[Cappellin2013a] Cappellin, L., E. Aprea, P. Granitto, A. Romano, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Multiclass methods in the analysis of metabolomic datasets: The example of raspberry cultivar volatile compounds detected by GC-MS and PTR-MS", Food Research International: Elsevier, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996913000975
Abstract
Multiclass sample classification and marker selection are cutting-edge problems in metabolomics. In the present study we address the classification of 14 raspberry cultivars having different levels of gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) susceptibility. We characterized raspberry cultivars by two headspace analysis methods, namely solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (SPME/GC–MS) and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Given the high number of classes, advanced data mining methods are necessary. Random Forest (RF), Penalized Discriminant Analysis (PDA), Discriminant Partial Least Squares (dPLS) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) have been employed for cultivar classification and Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) has been used to perform feature selection. In particular the most important GC–MS and PTR-MS variables related to gray mold susceptibility of the selected raspberry cultivars have been investigated. Moving from GC–MS profiling to the more rapid and less invasive PTR-MS fingerprinting leads to a cultivar characterization which is still related to the corresponding Botrytis susceptibility level and therefore marker identification is still possible.
[Holopainen2013] Holopainen, J. K., A-M. Nerg, and J. D. Blande, "Multitrophic signalling in polluted atmospheres", Biology, controls and models of tree volatile organic compound emissions: Springer, pp. 285–314, 2013.
Link: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-007-6606-8_11
Abstract
Volatile compounds emitted by plants in response to herbivory serve as important cues within and between trophic levels, and as cues over more than two trophic levels, such as in the attraction of enemies of herbivores. However, many of the volatiles elicited by herbivory are highly reactive with key atmospheric pollutants, implying that the signal is communicated over increasingly shorter distances with increasing pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere. Thus, polluted atmospheres can importantly alter the multitrophic interactions between trees, herbivores and herbivore enemies. This chapter highlights the alterations in multitrophic interactions and resulting modifications in plant fitness in polluted atmospheres.
[Mueller2013] Müller, M., T. Mikoviny, W. Jud, B. D'Anna, and A. Wisthaler, "A new software tool for the analysis of high resolution PTR-TOF mass spectra", Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, vol. 127, pp. 158 - 165, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169743913001275
Abstract
Abstract The High Resolution Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR PTR-TOF-MS) is a powerful analytical tool used by various scientific communities for real-time measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The analysis of \{HR\} PTR-TOF-MS data is, however, particularly demanding because of the large amount of complex data being generated. Based on recently developed or described mathematical methods, we have produced a new software tool, the PTR-TOF Data Analyzer, which greatly facilitates the data analysis process. The new software solution allows for i) a combined Poisson counting statistics and dead time correction of ion count rates, ii) accurate mass axis calibration, iii) an iterative residual peak analysis that detects up to 5 isobaric peaks per unit m/z, iv) time series analysis of both low and high mass and time resolution data and v) visualization of analysis results for fast quality assurance checks. After having been successfully tested by a group of users with different application needs, the PTR-TOF Data Analyzer is made generally available to the scientific community. This will improve the user-friendliness of the PTR-TOF-MS technique and facilitate scientific work with this new analytical mass spectrometer.
[Kohl2013a] Kohl, I., J. Beauchamp, F. Cakar-Beck, J. Herbig, J. Dunkl, O. Tietje, M. Tiefenthaler, C. Boesmueller, A. Wisthaler, M. Breitenlechner, et al., "Non-invasive detection of renal function via breath gas analysis: A potential biomarker for organ acceptance?", 6th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 24, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
Abstract
Breath gas analysis is an emerging field that attempts to link components in exhaled breath gas with state-of-health or illness [1]. This is based on the premise that disease in the body will elicit abnormal biochemical reactions which in turn produce chemical compounds that might be excreted by the body - at least in part - via exhalation. We used PTR-MS to directly sample and analyse selected VOC constituents in the exhaled breath of patients (n=96) undergoing kidney transplantation. Breath samples were taken before surgery and then over an extended period thereafter. Comparison of PTR-MS data with routine blood-serum data revealed a specific compound (ion trace) at m/z 115 that correlated with creatinine in blood serum and daily urine production, which are the current generally-accepted markers for kidney function. PTR-TOF analyses revealed that this compound had an exact molecular mass of 114.104 u and a chemical composition of C7H14O. Subsequent analyses using PTR-QqQ-MS suggested the compound to be a C7-ketone or branched C7-aldehyde. It is hoped that the results of this study will provide impetus to other researchers in the field to further delve into the nature of this compound and its possible biochemical production routes to ascertain the eligibility of this compound for potential use in future routine breath analysis for renal function assessment.
[Fares2013] Fares, S., R. Schnitzhofer, X. Jiang, A. Guenther, A. Hansel, and F. Loreto, "Observations of diurnal to weekly variations of monoterpene-dominated fluxes of volatile organic compounds from Mediterranean forests: implications for regional modeling.", Environ Sci Technol, Sep, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es4022156
Abstract
The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests, and dune vegetation. In this work, Basal Emission Factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parameterize the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (Community Land Model, CLM v4.0) of the Community Earth System Model (CESM v1.0). Results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parameterization.
[Gloess2013a] Gloess, A. N., A. Vietri, S. Bongers, T. Koziorowski, and C. Yeretzian, "On-line Analysis of the Coffee Roasting Process with PTR-ToF-MS: Evidence of Different Flavor Formation Dynamics for Different Coffee Varieties", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 166, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[1667] Inomata, S., H. Tanimoto, Y. Fujitani, K. Sekimoto, K. Sato, A. Fushimi, H. Yamada, S. Hori, Y. Kumazawa, A. Shimono, et al., "On-line measurements of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel vehicle exhaust by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 73, pp. 195–203, Jul, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2013.03.035
Abstract
<p>Nitro-organic compounds, some of which cause adverse health effects in humans, are emitted in diesel engine exhaust. Speciation and quantification of these nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust particles have been extensively conducted; however, investigations into the emissions of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust have not. In the present study, the properties of gaseous nitro-organic compounds in diesel engine exhaust were investigated through time-resolved measurement with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer and a chassis dynamometer. Three diesel trucks were tested, each with a different type of exhaust-gas treatment system (i.e., aftertreatment). Among the nitro-organic compounds detected, the emission of nitromethane was commonly observed and found to be related to the emissions of carbon monoxide, benzene, and acetone. The emission of other nitro-organic compounds, such as nitrophenol, depended on the vehicle, possibly due to the type of aftertreatment installed.</p>
[1456] Zardin, E., O. Tyapkova, A. Buettner, and J. Beauchamp, "Performance assessment of proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for analysis of isobaric compounds in food-flavour applications", \{LWT\} - Food Science and Technology, pp. -, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023643813003964
Abstract
<p>Abstract Characterisation of food-flavour release using quadrupole-based on-line mass spectrometers such as proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS, or PTR-QMS) can be complicated when nominally isobaric aroma compounds are present in complex food matrices. The recent combination of PTR-MS with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) offers an analytical tool potentially capable of overcoming this problem because of its enhanced mass resolution. In this context, four pairs of isobaric compounds (cis-3-hexenol and 2,3-pentanedione, benzaldehyde and m-xylene, ethyl butanoate and 2-methylbutanol, and isobutyl isopentanoate and 1-hexanol) were investigated by PTR-TOF-MS to assess its mass-resolving power for food-flavour applications. Headspace analyses of aqueous solutions containing nominally isobaric aroma compounds that are unresolvable by PTR-QMS demonstrated that the PTR-TOF-MS mass-resolving power, which is m/z-dependent, enabled discrimination between isobaric peaks at a centre of mass separation down to at least 0.030&nbsp;Da. Visual discrimination between these isobaric compound peaks in the headspace of aqueous solutions down to a concentration range of a few tens of ng&nbsp;mL&minus;1 was also possible, enabling an empirical method for determining the limit of quantitation in solution for single compounds. PTR-TOF-MS offers distinct advantages over conventional PTR-MS for certain flavour release applications.</p>
[Sidheswaran2013] Sidheswaran, M., S. Cohn, D. P. Sullivan, and L. A. Gundel, "Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Interscan 4160-500B Portable Monitor", , 2013.
Link: http://eetd.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6357e.pdf
[1458] Beauchamp, J., J. Herbig, J. Dunkl, W. Singer, and A. Hansel, "On the performance of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for breath-relevant gas matrices", Measurement Science and Technology, vol. 24, pp. 125003, 2013.
Link: http://stacks.iop.org/0957-0233/24/i=12/a=125003
[Gloess2013] Gloess, A. N., M. Wellinger, B. Schoenbaechler, F. Wieland, C. Lindinger, and C. Yeretzian, "Predicting the Sensory Profiles of Coffee based on PTR-ToF-MS and GC-MS Measurements", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 54, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Yanagisawa2013] Yanagisawa, N., and K. Enya, "Preliminary results of measurement of volatile compounds adsorbed on diesel exhaust particles by PTR-TOFMS", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 239, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[1594] Schuhfried, E., T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Primary Ion Depletion Kinetics (PIDK) Studies as a New Tool for Investigating Chemical Ionization Fragmentation Reactions with PTR-MS.", PLoS One, vol. 8, pp. e66925, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066925
Abstract
<p>We report on a new approach for studying fragmentation channels in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), which we name primary ion depletion kinetics (PIDK). PTR-MS is a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) technique deploying hydronium ions for the chemical ionization. Induced by extremely high concentrations of analyte M, depletion of the primary ions in the drift tube occurs. This is observed as quasi zero concentration of the primary ion H3O(+), and constant MH(+). Under these non-standard conditions, we find an overall changed fragmentation. We offer two explanations. Either the changed fragmentation pattern is the result of secondary proton transfer reactions. Or, alternatively, the fast depletion of H3O(+) leads to reduced heating of H3O(+) in the drift field, and consequently changed fragmentation following protonation of the analyte M. In any case, we use the observed changes in fragmentation as a successful new approach to fragmentation studies, and term it primary ion depletion kinetics, PIDK. PIDK easily yields an abundance of continuous data points with little deviation, because they are obtained in one experimental run, even for low abundant fragments. This is an advantage over traditional internal kinetic energy variation studies (electric field per number density (E/N) variation studies). Also, some interpretation on the underlying fragmentation reaction mechanisms can be gleamed. We measure low occurring fragmentation (&lt;2% of MH(+)) of the compounds dimethyl sulfide, DMS, a compound that reportedly does not fragment, diethyl sulfide DES, and dipropyl sulfide DPS. And we confirm and complement the results with traditional E/N studies. Summing up, the new approach of primary ion depletion kinetics allows for the identification of dehydrogenation [MH(+) -H2] and adduct formation (RMH(+)) as low abundant fragmentation channels in monosulfides.</p>
[Zhang2013] Zhang, G., S. Nan Gao, W. Ding Wei, and Q. Jian Xu, "Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry Determination of the Emission Rate of Flavor Ingredients in Toothpastes", Applied Mechanics and Materials, vol. 299: Trans Tech Publ, pp. 229–232, 2013.
Link: http://www.scientific.net/AMM.299.229
Abstract
Under the experimental conditions, the headspace concentration of two flavor ingredients in toothpastes, limonene (C10H16) and menthone (C10H18O), was measured with proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Combined with the theoretical diffusion model and analytical solution, the partition coefficient and the emission rate of the two ingredients from toothpaste diluent to the circulated air were calculated. Theoretical Solutions of the distribution coefficients were obtained respectively as 0.00432 and 0.00418 for C10H16 and C10H18O. The corresponding simulated flavor concentration in headspace air Ca(t) had good agreement with the experimental values (R2 = 0.983 and 0.958 respectively). The exponential decay rate formulas for the two flavors were obtained from experimental data and the solution of the theoretical model.
[Hartungen2013] Hartungen, E., S. Juerschik, A. Jordan, A. Edtbauer, S. Feil, G. Hanel, H. Seehauser, S. Haidacher, R. Schottkowsky, L. Märk, et al., "Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: fundamentals, recent advances and applications", The European Physical Journal Applied Physics, vol. 61, no. 02: Cambridge Univ Press, pp. 24303, 2013.
Link: http://journals.cambridge.org/production/action/cjoGetFulltext?fulltextid=8836242
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) offers many advantages for trace gas analysis, including no sample preparation, real-time analysis, high selectivity and sensitivity, ultra-low detection limits and very short response times. These characteristic features have made it an ideal tool for many applications in science, technology and society. Here we will discuss recent developments, in particular advances concerning sensitivity, selectivity and general applicability.
[Papurello2013] Papurello, D., A. Lanzini, E. Schufried, M. Santarelli, S. Silvestri, and F. Biasioli, "Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) as a rapid online tool for biogas VOCs monitoring in support of the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 144, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Lindinger2013] Lindinger, C., L. Märk, P. Sulzer, S. Juerschik, B. Agarwal, C. A. Mayhew, and T. D. Märk, "Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry: Increased Selectivity in Explosives and Designer Drugs Detection", : IONICON Analytik, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/poster_ionicon_pittcon_2013_explosives_and_designer_drugs_detection.pdf
[Cappellin2013] Cappellin, L., F. Loreto, E. Aprea, A. Romano, J. Sánchez { Del Pulgar}, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "PTR-MS in Italy: A Multipurpose Sensor with Applications in Environmental, Agri-Food and Health Science.", Sensors (Basel), vol. 13, no. 9: Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM), Via E. Mach 1, San Michele all'Adige 38010, Italy. francesco.loreto@cnr.it., pp. 11923–11955, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s130911923
Abstract
Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) has evolved in the last decade as a fast and high sensitivity sensor for the real-time monitoring of volatile compounds. Its applications range from environmental sciences to medical sciences, from food technology to bioprocess monitoring. Italian scientists and institutions participated from the very beginning in fundamental and applied research aiming at exploiting the potentialities of this technique and providing relevant methodological advances and new fundamental indications. In this review we describe this activity on the basis of the available literature. The Italian scientific community has been active mostly in food science and technology, plant physiology and environmental studies and also pioneered the applications of the recently released PTR-ToF-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry) in food science and in plant physiology. In the very last years new results related to bioprocess monitoring and health science have been published as well. PTR-MS data analysis, particularly in the case of the ToF based version, and the application of advanced chemometrics and data mining are also aspects characterising the activity of the Italian community.
[Liu2013] Liu, D., A. Feilberg, A. Michael Nielsen, and A. Peter S. Adamsen, "PTR-MS measurement of partition coefficients of reduced volatile sulfur compounds in liquids from biotrickling filters.", Chemosphere, vol. 90, no. 4: Dept. of Engineering, Aarhus University, Blichers Alle 20, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark., pp. 1396–1403, Jan, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.07.068
Abstract
Biological air filtration for reduction of emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (e.g., hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide) from livestock production facilities is challenged by poor partitioning of these compounds into the aqueous biofilm or filter trickling water. In this study, Henry's law constants of reduced volatile sulfur compounds were measured for deionized water, biotrickling filter liquids (from the first and second stages of a two-stage biotrickling filter), and NaCl solutions by a dynamic method using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) at a temperature range of 3-45°C. NaCl solutions were used to estimate salting-out constants up to an ionic strength of 0.7 M in order to evaluate the effect of ionic strength on partitioning between air and biofilter liquids. Thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy of phase exchange) were obtained from the measured partition coefficients as a function of temperature. The results show that the partition coefficients of organic sulfur compounds in the biotrickling filter liquids were generally very close to the corresponding partition coefficients in deionized water. Based on the estimated ionic strength of biofilter liquids, it is assessed that salting-out effects are of no importance for these compounds. For H(2)S, a higher enthalpy of air-liquid partitioning was observed for 2nd stage filter liquid, but not for 1st stage filter liquid. In general, the results show that co-solute effects for sulfur compounds can be neglected in numerical biofilter models and that the uptake of volatile sulfur compounds in biotrickling filter liquids cannot be increased by decreasing ionic strength.
[Zahn2013] Zahn, A., M. Neumaier, F. Geiger, and G. Fischbeck, "PTRMS onboard passenger and research aircraft: technical realization, performance, and results", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 135, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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