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[Christian2003] Christian, TJ., B. Kleiss, RJ. Yokelson, R. Holzinger, PJ. Crutzen, WM. Hao, BH. Saharjo, and DE. Ward, "Comprehensive laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1. Emissions from Indonesian, African, and other fuels", J. Geophys. Res, vol. 108, no. 4719, pp. 1–4719, 2003.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2003/2003JD003704.shtml
Abstract
Trace gas and particle emissions were measured from 47 laboratory fires burning 16 regionally to globally significant fuel types. Instrumentation included the following: open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry; filter sampling with subsequent analysis of particles with diameter <2.5 μm for organic and elemental carbon and other elements; and canister sampling with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC)/flame ionization detector, GC/electron capture detector, and GC/mass spectrometry. The emissions of 26 compounds are reported by fuel type. The results include the first detailed measurements of the emissions from Indonesian fuels. Carbon dioxide, CO, CH4, NH3, HCN, methanol, and acetic acid were the seven most abundant emissions (in order) from burning Indonesian peat. Acetol (hydroxyacetone) was a major, previously unobserved emission from burning rice straw (21–34 g/kg). The emission factors for our simulated African fires are consistent with field data for African fires for compounds measured in both the laboratory and the field. However, the higher concentrations and more extensive instrumentation in this work allowed quantification of at least 10 species not previously quantified for African field fires (in order of abundance): acetaldehyde, phenol, acetol, glycolaldehyde, methylvinylether, furan, acetone, acetonitrile, propenenitrile, and propanenitrile. Most of these new compounds are oxygenated organic compounds, which further reinforces the importance of these reactive compounds as initial emissions from global biomass burning. A few high-combustion-efficiency fires emitted very high levels of elemental (black) carbon, suggesting that biomass burning may produce more elemental carbon than previously estimated.
[Christian2004] Christian, TJ., B. Kleiss, RJ. Yokelson, R. Holzinger, PJ. Crutzen, WM. Hao, T. Shirai, and DR. Blake, "Comprehensive laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 2. First intercomparison of open-path FTIR, PTR-MS, and GC-MS/FID/ECD", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 109, no. D2: American Geophysical Union, pp. D02311, 2004.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2003JD003874.shtml
Abstract
Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC) can dominate atmospheric organic chemistry, but they are difficult to measure reliably at low levels in complex mixtures. Several techniques that have been used to speciate nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) including OVOC were codeployed/intercompared in well-mixed smoke generated by 47 fires in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Fire Sciences Combustion Facility. The agreement between proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) was excellent for methanol (PT/FT = 1.04 ± 0.118) and good on average for phenol (0.843 ± 0.845) and acetol (∼0.81). The sum of OP-FTIR mixing ratios for acetic acid and glycolaldehyde agreed (within experimental uncertainty) with the PTR-MS mixing ratios for protonated mass 61 (PT/FT = 1.17 ± 0.34), and the sum of OP-FTIR mixing ratios for furan and isoprene agreed with the PTR-MS mixing ratios for protonated mass 69 (PT/FT = 0.783 ± 0.465). The sum of OP-FTIR mixing ratios for acetone and methylvinylether accounted for most of the PTR-MS protonated mass 59 signal (PT/FT = 1.29 ± 0.81), suggesting that one of these compounds was underestimated by OP-FTIR or that it failed to detect other compounds that could contribute at mass 59. Canister grab sampling followed by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometry (MS), flame ionization detection (FID), and electron capture detection (ECD) analysis by two different groups agreed well with OP-FTIR for ethylene, acetylene, and propylene. However, these propylene levels were below those observed by PTR-MS (PT/FT = 2.33 ± 0.89). Good average agreement between PTR-MS and GC was obtained for benzene and toluene. At mixing ratios above a few parts per billion the OP-FTIR had advantages for measuring sticky compounds (e.g., ammonia and formic acid) or compounds with low proton affinity (e.g., hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde). Even at these levels, only the PTR-MS measured acetonitrile and acetaldehyde. Below a few ppbv only the PTR-MS measured a variety of OVOC, but the possibility of fragmentation, interference, and sampling losses must be considered.
[Davison2009] Davison, B., R. Taipale, B. Langford, P. Misztal, S. Fares, G. Matteucci, F. Loreto, JN. Cape, J. Rinne, and CN. Hewitt, "Concentrations and fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds above a Mediterranean macchia ecosystem in western Italy", Biogeosciences, vol. 6: EGU, pp. 1655–1670, 2009.
Link: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/8091/
Abstract
Emission rates and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were measured at a Mediterranean coastal site at Castelporziano, approximately 25 km south-west of Rome, between 7 May and 3 June 2007, as part of the ACCENT-VOCBAS field campaign on biosphere–atmosphere interactions. Concentrations and emission rates were measured using the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method utilizing three different proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) so allowing a comparison between the instruments. The high resolution data from the PTR-MS instruments considerably enhances the original BEMA measurements of the mid 1990s. Depending on the measurement period, the volume mixing ratios were in the range 1.6–3.5 ppbv for methanol, 0.44–1.3 ppbv for acetaldehyde, 0.96–2.1 ppbv for acetone, 0.10–0.14 ppbv for isoprene, and 0.13–0.30 ppbv for monoterpenes. A diurnal cycle in mixing ratios was apparent with daytime maxima for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and isoprene. The fluxes ranged from 370–440 μg m−2 h−1 for methanol, 180–360 μg m−2 h−1 for acetaldehyde, 180–450 μg m−2 h−1 for acetone, 71–290 μg m−2 h−1 for isoprene, and 240–860 μg m−2 h−1 for monoterpenes. From the measured flux data (7 May–3 June) an average basal emission rate for the Macchia vegetation was calculated of 430 μg m−2 h−1 for isoprene and 1100 μg m−2 h−1 for monoterpenes.
[Joo2011] Joó, É., J. Dewulf, C. Amelynck, N. Schoon, O. Pokorska, M. Šimpraga, K. Steppe, M. Aubinet, and H. Van Langenhove, "Constitutive versus heat and biotic stress induced BVOC emissions in Pseudotsuga menziesii", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 45, no. 22: Elsevier, pp. 3655–3662, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231011004377
Abstract
Induced volatiles have been a focus of recent research, as not much is known of their emission behavior or atmospheric contribution. BVOC emissions were measured from Pseudotsuga menziesii saplings under natural environmental conditions, using a dynamic branch enclosure system and GC–MS for their analysis. We determined temperature and light dependency of the individual compounds, studied seasonality of the emissions and discuss the effect of heat stress in comparison with two specific biotic stresses that occurred naturally on the trees. A standardized emission rate of 6.8 μg g(dw)−1 h−1 for monoterpenes under stressed conditions was almost a magnitude higher than that obtained for healthy trees (0.8 ± 0.2 μg g(dw)−1 h−1), with higher beta factors characterizing the stressed trees. The response of the emissions to light intensity was different for the individual compounds, suggesting a distinct minimum light intensity to reach saturation. Heat stress changed the relative contribution of specific volatiles, with larger extent of increase of sesquiterpenes, methyl salicylate and linalool emissions compared to monoterpenes. Biotic stress kept low the emissions of sesquiterpenes, (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and methylbutenol isomers, and increased the level of methyl salicylate and monoterpenes. The ratio of β-pinene/α-pinene was also found to be significantly enhanced from 1.3 to 2.4 and 3.2 for non-stressed, heat stressed and combined biotic and heat stressed, respectively.
[Sinha2012a] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "Constraints on instantaneous ozone production rates and regimes during DOMINO derived using in-situ OH reactivity measurements", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 15: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 7269–7283, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/7269/2012/acp-12-7269-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21/11/2008 to 08/12/2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 s−1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[1699] Trefz, P., M. Schmidt, P. Oertel, J. Obermeier, B. Brock, S. Kamysek, J. Dunkl, R. Zimmermann, J. K. Schubert, and W. Miekisch, "Continuous real time breath gas monitoring in the clinical environment by proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.", Anal Chem, vol. 85, pp. 10321–10329, Nov, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac402298v
Abstract
<p>Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath holds great promise for noninvasive diagnostic applications. However, concentrations of VOCs in breath may change quickly, and actual and previous uptakes of exogenous substances, especially in the clinical environment, represent crucial issues. We therefore adapted proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry for real time breath analysis in the clinical environment. For reasons of medical safety, a 6 m long heated silcosteel transfer line connected to a sterile mouth piece was used for breath sampling from spontaneously breathing volunteers and mechanically ventilated patients. A time resolution of 200 ms was applied. Breath from mechanically ventilated patients was analyzed immediately after cardiac surgery. Breath from 32 members of staff was analyzed in the post anesthetic care unit (PACU). In parallel, room air was measured continuously over 7 days. Detection limits for breath-resolved real time measurements were in the high pptV/low ppbV range. Assignment of signals to alveolar or inspiratory phases was done automatically by a matlab-based algorithm. Quickly and abruptly occurring changes of patients&#39; clinical status could be monitored in terms of breath-to-breath variations of VOC (e.g. isoprene) concentrations. In the PACU, room air concentrations mirrored occupancy. Exhaled concentrations of sevoflurane strongly depended on background concentrations in all participants. In combination with an optimized inlet system, the high time and mass resolution of PTR-ToF-MS provides optimal conditions to trace quick changes of breath VOC profiles and to assess effects from the clinical environment.</p>
[1701] Maja, M. M., A. Kasurinen, P. Yli-Pirilä, J. Joutsensaari, T. Klemola, T. Holopainen, and J. K. Holopainen, "Contrasting responses of silver birch VOC emissions to short- and long-term herbivory.", Tree Physiol, vol. 34, pp. 241–252, Mar, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpt127
Abstract
<p>There is a need to incorporate the effects of herbivore damage into future models of plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions at leaf or canopy levels. Short-term (a few seconds to 48 h) changes in shoot VOC emissions of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) in response to feeding by geometrid moths (Erannis defoliaria Hübner) were monitored online by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS). In addition, two separate field experiments were established to study the effects of long-term foliage herbivory (FH, 30-32 days of feeding by geometrids Agriopis aurantiaria (Clerck) and E. defoliaria in two consecutive years) and bark herbivory (BH, 21 days of feeding by the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis L.) in the first year) on shoot and rhizosphere VOC emissions of three silver birch genotypes (gt14, gt15 and Hausjärvi provenance). Online monitoring of VOCs emitted from foliage damaged by geometrid larvae showed rapid bursts of green leaf volatiles (GLVs) immediately after feeding activity, whereas terpenoid emissions had a tendency to gradually increase during the monitoring period. Long-term FH caused transient increases in total monoterpene (MT) emissions from gt14 and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions from Hausjärvi provenance, mainly in the last experimental season. In the BH experiment, genotype effects were detected, with gt14 trees having significantly higher total MT emissions compared with other genotypes. Only MTs were detected in the rhizosphere samples of both field experiments, but their emission rates were unaffected by genotype or herbivory. The results suggest that silver birch shows a rapid VOC emission response to short-term foliage herbivory, whereas the response to long-term foliage herbivory and bark herbivory is less pronounced and variable at different time points.</p>
[Schnitzler2004] SCHNITZLER, JÖRG-PETER., M. Graus, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Contribution of different carbon sources to isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves", Plant Physiology, vol. 135, no. 1: Am Soc Plant Biol, pp. 152–160, 2004.
Link: http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/135/1/152.short
Abstract
This study was performed to test if alternative carbon sources besides recently photosynthetically fixed CO2 are used for isoprene formation in the leaves of young poplar (Populus × canescens) trees. In a 13CO2 atmosphere under steady state conditions, only about 75% of isoprene became 13C labeled within minutes. A considerable part of the unlabeled carbon may be derived from xylem transported carbohydrates, as may be shown by feeding leaves with [U-13C]Glc. As a consequence of this treatment approximately 8% to 10% of the carbon emitted as isoprene was 13C labeled. In order to identify further carbon sources, poplar leaves were depleted of leaf internal carbon pools and the carbon pools were refilled with 13C labeled carbon by exposure to 13CO2. Results from this treatment showed that about 30% of isoprene carbon became 13C labeled, clearly suggesting that, in addition to xylem transported carbon and CO2, leaf internal carbon pools, e.g. starch, are used for isoprene formation. This use was even increased when net assimilation was reduced, for example by abscisic acid application. The data provide clear evidence of a dynamic exchange of carbon between different cellular precursors for isoprene biosynthesis, and an increasing importance of these alternative carbon pools under conditions of limited photosynthesis. Feeding [1,2-13C]Glc and [3-13C]Glc to leaves via the xylem suggested that alternative carbon sources are probably derived from cytosolic pyruvate/phosphoenolpyruvate equivalents and incorporated into isoprene according to the predicted cleavage of the 3-C position of pyruvate during the initial step of the plastidic deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate pathway.
[Ng2006] Ng, N. L., J. H. Kroll, M. D. Keywood, R. Bahreini, V. Varutbangkul, R. C. Flagan, J. H. Seinfeld, A. Lee, and A. H. Goldstein, "Contribution of first- versus second-generation products to secondary organic aerosols formed in the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 40, no. 7: Department of Environmental Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA., pp. 2283–2297, Apr, 2006.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es052269u
Abstract
Biogenic hydrocarbons emitted by vegetation are important contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the aerosol formation mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, the formation of aerosols and gas-phase products from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of a series of biogenic hydrocarbons (isoprene, 8 monoterpenes, 4 sesquiterpenes, and 3 oxygenated terpenes) are examined. By comparing aerosol growth (measured by Differential Mobility Analyzers, DMAs) and gas-phase concentrations (monitored by a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer, PTR-MS), we study the general mechanisms of SOA formation. Aerosol growth data are presented in terms of a "growth curve", a plot of aerosol mass formed versus the amount of hydrocarbon reacted. From the shapes of the growth curves, it is found that all the hydrocarbons studied can be classified into two groups based entirely on the number of double bonds of the hydrocarbon, regardless of the reaction systems (ozonolysis or photooxidation) and the types of hydrocarbons studied: compounds with only one double bond and compounds with more than one double bond. For compounds with only one double bond, the first oxidation step is rate-limiting, and aerosols are formed mainly from low volatility first-generation oxidation products; whereas for compounds with more than one double bond, the second oxidation step may also be rate-limiting and second-generation products contribute substantially to SOA growth. This behavior is characterized by a vertical section in the growth curve, in which continued aerosol growth is observed even after all the parent hydrocarbon is consumed.
[1822] Chandra, B.P.., and V. Sinha, "Contribution of post-harvest agricultural paddy residue fires in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain to ambient carcinogenic benzenoids, toxic isocyanic acid and carbon monoxide", Environment International, vol. 88, pp. 187–197, mar, 2016.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016041201530129X?via%3Dihub
Abstract
<p>In the north west Indo-Gangetic Plain (N.W.IGP), large scale post-harvest paddy residue fires occur every year during the months of October&ndash;November. This anthropogenic perturbation causes contamination of the atmospheric environment with adverse impacts on regional air quality posing health risks for the population exposed to high concentrations of carcinogens such as benzene and toxic VOCs such as isocyanic acid. These gases and carbon monoxide are known to be emitted from biomass fires along with acetonitrile. Yet no long-term in-situ measurements quantifying the impact of this activity have been carried out in the N.W. IGP. Using high quality continuous online in-situ measurements of these gases at a strategic downwind site over a three year period from 2012 to 2014, we demonstrate the strong impact of this anthropogenic emission activity on ambient concentrations of these gases. In contrast to the pre-paddy harvest period, excellent correlation of benzenoids, isocyanic acid and CO with acetonitrile (a biomass burning chemical tracer); (r &ge; 0.82) and distinct VOC/acetonitrile emission ratios were observed for the post-paddy harvest period which was also characterized by high ambient concentrations of these species. The average concentrations of acetonitrile (1.62 &plusmn; 0.18 ppb), benzene (2.51 &plusmn; 0.28 ppb), toluene (3.72 &plusmn; 0.41 ppb), C8-aromatics (2.88 &plusmn; 0.30 ppb), C9-aromatics (1.55 &plusmn; 0.19 ppb) and CO (552 &plusmn; 113 ppb) in the post-paddy harvest periods were about 1.5 times higher than the annual average concentrations. For isocyanic acid, a compound with both primary and secondary sources, the concentration in the post-paddy harvest period was 0.97 &plusmn; 0.17 ppb. The annual average concentrations of benzene, a class A carcinogen, exceeded the annual exposure limit of 1.6 ppb at NTP mandated by the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of India (NAAQS). We show that mitigating the post-harvest paddy residue fires can lower the annual average concentration of benzene and ensure compliance with the NAAQS. Calculations of excessive lifetime cancer risk due to benzene amount to 25 and 10 per million inhabitants for children and adults, respectively, exceeding the USEPA threshold of 1 per million inhabitants. Annual exposure to isocyanic acid was close to 1 ppb, the concentration considered to be sufficient to enhance risks for cardiovascular diseases and cataracts. This study makes a case for urgent mitigation of post-harvest paddy residue fires as the unknown synergistic effect of multi-pollutant exposure due to emissions from this anthropogenic source may be posing grave health risks to the population of the N.W. IGP.</p>
[Trowbridge2012] Trowbridge, A. M., D. Asensio, A. S. D. Eller, D. A. Way, M. J. Wilkinson, J-P. Schnitzler, R. B. Jackson, and R. K. Monson, "Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations.", PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 2: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, United States of America. amy.m.trowbridge@gmail.com, pp. e32387, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032387
Abstract
Biogenically released isoprene plays important roles in both tropospheric photochemistry and plant metabolism. We performed a (13)CO(2)-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the kinetics of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Populus x canescens) trees grown and measured at different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. This is the first study to explicitly consider the effects of altered atmospheric CO(2) concentration on carbon partitioning to isoprene biosynthesis. We studied changes in the proportion of labeled carbon as a function of time in two mass fragments, M41(+), which represents, in part, substrate derived from pyruvate, and M69(+), which represents the whole unlabeled isoprene molecule. We observed a trend of slower (13)C incorporation into isoprene carbon derived from pyruvate, consistent with the previously hypothesized origin of chloroplastic pyruvate from cytosolic phosphenolpyruvate (PEP). Trees grown under sub-ambient CO(2) (190 ppmv) had rates of isoprene emission and rates of labeling of M41(+) and M69(+) that were nearly twice those observed in trees grown under elevated CO(2) (590 ppmv). However, they also demonstrated the lowest proportion of completely labeled isoprene molecules. These results suggest that under reduced atmospheric CO(2) availability, more carbon from stored/older carbon sources is involved in isoprene biosynthesis, and this carbon most likely enters the isoprene biosynthesis pathway through the pyruvate substrate. We offer direct evidence that extra-chloroplastic rather than chloroplastic carbon sources are mobilized to increase the availability of pyruvate required to up-regulate the isoprene biosynthesis pathway when trees are grown under sub-ambient CO(2).
[Biasioli2006] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, I. Endrizzi, V. Framondino, F. Marini, D. Mott, and T. D. Maerk, "Correlation of PTR-MS spectral fingerprints with sensory characterisation of flavour and odour profile of "Trentingrana" cheese", Food quality and preference, vol. 17, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 63–75, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095032930500090X
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate detection of volatile organic compounds. The paper discusses the possibility of correlating the PTR-MS spectral fingerprint of the mixture of volatile compounds present in the head-space of 20 samples of “Trentingrana”, the variety of Grana Padano produced in Trentino (Northern Italy), with the sensory evaluation (Quantitative Descriptive Analysis) of the same samples obtained by a panel of trained judges. Only attributes related to odours (six attributes) and flavours (six attributes) are considered. Results of descriptive statistics are shown and the performances of different multivariate calibration methods (Partial Least Squares, both PLS1 and PLS2) are compared by evaluating the errors in the cross-validated estimation of the sensory attributes. PLS2 seems to give a good average description providing an overall insight of the problem but does not provide an accurate prediction of the individual sensory attributes. PLS1 analysis is more accurate and performs well in most cases but it uses several latent variables, so that the interpretation of the loadings is not straightforward. The preliminary application of Orthogonal Signal Correction filtering on PTR-MS spectra followed by PLS1 analysis results in a good estimation for most of the attributes and has the advantage to use only one or two latent variables. Comparison with other works and a tentative indication of the compounds correlated with sensory description are reported.
[1698] Righettoni, M.., A.. Schmid, A.. Amann, and S.. E. Pratsinis, "Correlations between blood glucose and breath components from portable gas sensors and PTR-TOF-MS.", J Breath Res, vol. 7, pp. 037110, Sep, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/7/3/037110
Abstract
<p>Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile compounds in the human breath and might be important for monitoring diabetic patients. Here, a portable acetone sensor consisting of flame-made, nanostructured, Si-doped WO3&nbsp;sensing films was used to analyse the end tidal fraction of the breath (collected in Tedlar bags) from eight healthy volunteers after overnight fasting (morning) and after lunch (afternoon). After breath sampling, the gaseous components were also analysed by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS), and each person&#39;s blood glucose level was measured. The portable sensor accurately detected the presence of acetone with fast response/recovery times (&lt;12&nbsp;s) and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Statistical analysis of the relationship between the PTR-TOF-MS measurements of breath gases (e.g., acetone, isoprene, ethanol and methanol), sensor response and the blood glucose level was performed for both sampling periods. The best correlations were found after overnight fasting (morning): in particular, between blood glucose level and breath acetone (Pearson&#39;s 0.98 and Spearman&#39;s 0.93). Whereas the portable sensor response correlated best with the blood glucose (Pearson&#39;s 0.96 and Spearman&#39;s 0.81) and breath acetone (Pearson&#39;s 0.92 and Spearman&#39;s 0.69).</p>
[Pollien2013] Pollien, P., F. Viton, and B. Le Révérend, "Coupling of in-mouth physical phenomena with nosespace analysis; a new method for understanding aroma release and perception from liquids", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 209, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Biasioli2003] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, D. Mott, E. Boscaini, D. Mayr, and T. D. Maerk, "Coupling proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry with linear discriminant analysis: a case study.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 51, no. 25: Istituto Agrario di S. Michele a/A, S. Michele, Via E. Mach 2, 38010, Italy. franco.biasioli@ismaa.it, pp. 7227–7233, Dec, 2003.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf030248i
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) measurements on single intact strawberry fruits were combined with an appropriate data analysis based on compression of spectrometric data followed by class modeling. In a first experiment 8 of 9 different strawberry varieties measured on the third to fourth day after harvest could be successfully distinguished by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on PTR-MS spectra compressed by discriminant partial least squares (dPLS). In a second experiment two varieties were investigated as to whether different growing conditions (open field, tunnel), location, and/or harvesting time can affect the proposed classification method. Internal cross-validation gives 27 successes of 28 tests for the 9 varieties experiment and 100% for the 2 clones experiment (30 samples). For one clone, present in both experiments, the models developed for one experiment were successfully tested with the homogeneous independent data of the other with success rates of 100% (3 of 3) and 93% (14 of 15), respectively. This is an indication that the proposed combination of PTR-MS with discriminant analysis and class modeling provides a new and valuable tool for product classification in agroindustrial applications.
[1917] Emmerson, K. M., I. E. Galbally, A. B. Guenther, C. Paton-Walsh, E-A. Guerette, M. E. Cope, M. D. Keywood, S. J. Lawson, S. B. Molloy, E. Dunne, et al., "Current estimates of biogenic emissions from eucalypts uncertain for southeast Australia", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 16, pp. 6997–7011, jun, 2016.
Abstract
<p>The biogenic emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes are one of the main drivers of atmospheric photochemistry, including oxidant and secondary organic aerosol production. In this paper, the emission rates of isoprene and monoterpenes from Australian vegetation are investigated for the first time using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGANv2.1); the CSIRO chemical transport model; and atmospheric observations of isoprene, monoterpenes and isoprene oxidation products (methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone). Observations from four field campaigns during three different seasons are used, covering urban, coastal suburban and inland forest areas. The observed concentrations of isoprene and monoterpenes were of a broadly similar magnitude, which may indicate that southeast Australia holds an unusual position where neither chemical species dominates. The model results overestimate the observed atmospheric concentrations of isoprene (up to a factor of 6) and underestimate the monoterpene concentrations (up to a factor of 4). This may occur because the emission rates currently used in MEGANv2.1 for Australia are drawn mainly from young eucalypt trees (&lt; 7 years), which may emit more isoprene than adult trees. There is no single increase/decrease factor for the emissions which suits all seasons and conditions studied. There is a need for further field measurements of in situ isoprene and monoterpene emission fluxes in Australia.</p>
[Davison2008] Davison, B.., A.. Brunner, C.. Ammann, C.. Spirig, M.. Jocher, and A.. Neftel, "Cut-induced VOC emissions from agricultural grasslands.", Plant Biol (Stuttg), vol. 10, no. 1: Department of Environmental Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK. b.davison@lancaster.ac.uk, pp. 76–85, Jan, 2008.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-965043
Abstract
The introduction of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for fast response measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) has enabled the use of eddy covariance methods to investigate VOC fluxes on the ecosystem scale. In this study PTR-MS flux measurements of VOC were performed over agricultural grassland during and after a cut event. Selected masses detected by the PTR-MS showed fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. They were highest directly after cutting and during the hay drying phase. Simultaneously, significant fluxes of protonated ion masses 73, 81, and 83 were observed. Due to the limited identification of compounds with the PTR-MS technique, GC-MS and GC-FID-PTR-MS techniques were additionally applied. In this way, ion mass 73 could be identified as 2-butanone, mass 81 mainly as (Z)-3-hexenal, and mass 83 mainly as the sum of (Z)-3-hexenol and hexenyl acetates. Hexenal, hexenols, and the hexenyl acetates are mostly related to plant wounding during cutting. It was found that legume plants and forbs emit a higher number of different VOC species than graminoids.
D
[Cappellin2011a] Cappellin, L., F. Biasioli, P. M. Granitto, E. Schuhfried, C. Soukoulis, F. Costa, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "On data analysis in PTR-TOF-MS: From raw spectra to data mining", Sensors and actuators B: Chemical, vol. 155, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 183–190, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925400510009135
Abstract
Recently the coupling of proton transfer reaction ionization with a time-of-flight mass analyser (PTR-TOF-MS) has been proposed to realise a volatile organic compound (VOC) detector that overcomes the limitations in terms of time and mass resolution of the previous instrument based on a quadrupole mass analysers (PTR-Quad-MS). This opens new horizons for research and allows for new applications in fields where the rapid and sensitive monitoring and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is crucial as, for instance, environmental sciences, food sciences and medicine. In particular, if coupled with appropriate data mining methods, it can provide a fast MS-nose system with rich analytical information. The main, perhaps even the only, drawback of this new technique in comparison to its precursor is related to the increased size and complexity of the data sets obtained. It appears that this is the main limitation to its full use and widespread application. Here we present and discuss a complete computer-based strategy for the data analysis of PTR-TOF-MS data from basic mass spectra handling, to the application of up-to date data mining methods. As a case study we apply the whole procedure to the classification of apple cultivars and clones, which was based on the distinctive profiles of volatile organic compound emissions.
[Miekisch2012] Miekisch, W., J. Herbig, and J. K. Schubert, "Data interpretation in breath biomarker research: pitfalls and directions", Journal of Breath Research, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 036007, 2012.
Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854185
[1584] Hörtnagl, L., R. Clement, M. Graus, A. Hammerle, A. Hansel, and G. Wohlfahrt, "Dealing with disjunct concentration measurements in eddy covariance applications: a comparison of available approaches.", Atmos Environ (1994), vol. 44, May, 2010.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231010001810
Abstract
<p>Using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry equipped with a quadrupol mass analyser to quantify the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations of different VOC are measured sequentially. Depending on how many VOC species are targeted and their respective integration times, each VOC is measured at repeat rates on the order of a few seconds. This represents an order of magnitude longer sample interval compared to the standard eddy covariance (EC) method (5-20 Hz sampling rates). Here we simulate the effect of disjunct sampling on EC flux estimates by decreasing the time resolution of CO2 and H2O concentrations measured at 20 Hz above a temperate mountain grassland in the Austrian Alps. Fluxes for one month are calculated with the standard EC method and compared to fluxes calculated based on the disjunct data (1, 3 and 5 s sampling rates) using the following approaches: i) imputation of missing concentrations based on the nearest neighbouring samples (iDECnn), ii) imputation by linear interpolation (iDECli), and iii) virtual disjunct EC (vDEC), i.e. flux calculation based solely on the disjunct concentrations. It is shown that the two imputation methods result in additional low-pass filtering, longer lag times (as determined with the maximum cross-correlation method) and a flux loss of 3-30 % as compared to the standard EC method. A novel procedure, based on a transfer function approach, which specifically corrects for the effect of data treatment, was developed, resulting in improved correspondence (to within 2 %). The vDEC method yields fluxes which approximate the true (20 Hz) fluxes to within 3-7 % and it is this approach we recommend because it involves no additional empirical corrections. The only drawback of the vDEC method is the noisy nature of the cross-correlations, which poses problems with lag determination - practical approaches to overcome this limitation are discussed.</p>
[Bamberger2011] Bamberger, I., L. Hörtnagl, TM. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, M. Graus, T. Karl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Deposition fluxes of terpenes over grassland", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 116, no. D14: Wiley Online Library, 2011.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2010JD015457/full
Abstract
Eddy covariance flux measurements were carried out for two subsequent vegetation periods above a temperate mountain grassland in an alpine valley using a proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a PTR time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF). In 2008 and during the first half of the vegetation period 2009 the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for the sum of monoterpenes (MTs) were typically well below 1 ppbv and neither MT emission nor deposition was observed. After a hailstorm in July 2009 an order of magnitude higher amount of terpenes was transported to the site from nearby coniferous forests causing elevated VMRs. As a consequence, deposition fluxes of terpenes to the grassland, which continued over a time period of several weeks without significant reemission, were observed. For days without precipitation the deposition occurred at velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. In addition to monoterpene uptake, deposition fluxes of the sum of sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and the sum of oxygenated terpenes (OTs) were detected. Considering an entire growing season for the grassland (i.e., 1 April to 1 November 2009), the cumulative carbon deposition of monoterpenes reached 276 mg C m−2. This is comparable to the net carbon emission of methanol (329 mg C m−2), which is the dominant nonmethane volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted from this site, during the same time period. It is suggested that deposition of monoterpenes to terrestrial ecosystems could play a more significant role in the reactive carbon budget than previously assumed.
[Bamberger2012] Bamberger, I., L. Hoertnagl, T. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, M. Graus, T. Karl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Deposition of terpenes to vegetation-a paradigm shift towards bidirectional VOC exchange?", EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, vol. 14, pp. 7949, 2012.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7949B
Abstract
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are important precursors for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation (Hallquist et al., 2009). In addition reactive BVOCs play a crucial role in local tropospheric ozone production (Atkinson, 2000). According to the present scientific understanding vegetation is recognized as a major VOC emission source rather than a deposition sink. Our recent observations however demonstrate that an uptake of terpene compounds to mountain grassland can be significant - at least under certain atmospheric conditions. After a severe hailstorm volume mixing ratios (VMR) of locally emitted terpene compounds originating from conifers located at the mountain slopes were strongly enhanced, even during daytime hours. Weeks after the hailstorm our PTR-MS and PTR-time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instruments still measured deposition fluxes of monoterpenes (m/z 137.133), sesquiterpenes (m/z 205.195), and oxygenated terpenes (m/z 153.128) to the grassland. The total amount of terpenoids (on a carbon basis) deposited to the grassland during the weeks after the hailstorm is comparable to the total methanol emission of the entire growing season (Bamberger et al., 2011). These findings pose the question whether the terminology should be adjusted from VOC emission to VOC exchange.
[Fang2008] Fang, L.., G.. Zhang, and A.. Wisthaler, "Desiccant wheels as gas-phase absorption (GPA) air cleaners: evaluation by PTR-MS and sensory assessment.", Indoor Air, vol. 18, no. 5: International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. fl@byg.dtu.dk, pp. 375–385, Oct, 2008.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2008.00538.x
Abstract
Two experiments were conducted to investigate the use of the co-sorption effect of a desiccant wheel for improving indoor air quality. One experiment was conducted in a climate chamber to investigate the co-sorption effect of a desiccant wheel on the chemical removal of indoor air pollutants; another experiment was conducted in an office room to investigate the resulting effect on perceived air quality. A dehumidifier with a silica-gel desiccant wheel was installed in the ventilation system of the test chamber and office room to treat the recirculation airflow. Human subjects, flooring materials and four pure chemicals (formaldehyde, ethanol, toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane) were used as air pollution sources. Proton-Transfer-Reaction–Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and sensory subjects were used to characterize the effectiveness of chemical and sensory pollution removal of the desiccant wheel. The experiments revealed that all the measured VOCs were removed effectively by the desiccant wheel with an average efficiency of 94% or higher; more than 80% of the sensory pollution load was removed and the percentage dissatisfied with the air quality decreased from 70% to 20%. These results indicate that incorporating a regenerative desiccant wheel in a ventilation system is an efficient way of removing indoor VOCs. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study may lead to the development of new air cleaners and validates a new concept for the design of ventilation systems that can improve indoor air quality and reduce energy consumption.
[Juerschik2013] Juerschik, S., M. Lanza, P. Sulzer, B. Agarwal, E. Hartungen, A. Edtbauer, S. Feil, A. Jordan, G. Hanel, CA. Mayhew, et al., "Designer Drugs and Trace Explosives Detection with the Help of Very Recent Advancements in Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 182, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Sulzer2012a] Sulzer, P., S. Juerschik, B. Agarwal, T. Kassebacher, E. Hartungen, A. Edtbauer, F. Petersson, J. Warmer, G. Holl, D. Perry, et al., "Designer Drugs and Trace Explosives Detection with the Help of Very Recent Advancements in Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Future Security: Springer, pp. 366–375, 2012.
Link: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33161-9_55
Abstract
At the "Future Security 2011" we presented an overview of our studies on the "Detection and Identification of Illicit and Hazardous Substances with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)" including first results on explosives, chemical warfare agents and illicit and prescribed drugs detection. Since then we have considerably extended these preliminary studies to the detection of defined traces of some of the most common explosives, namely TNT, PETN, TATP, and DATP deposited into aluminum foam bodies, and to the detection of a number of novel and widely unknown designer drugs: ethylphenidate, 4-fluoroamphetamine and dimethocaine. Moreover, we have dramatically improved our time-of-flight based PTR-MS instruments by substantially increasing their sensitivity and hence lowering the detection limit, making them even more suitable and applicable to threat agents with extremely low vapour pressures. Data from measurements on certified gas standards are presented in order to underline these statements. The data demonstrate that, in comparison to the first generation instruments, a gain of one order of magnitude in terms of sensitivity and detection limit has been obtained.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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