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Found 775 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
2001
[Rieder2001] Rieder, J.., P.. Lirk, C.. Ebenbichler, G.. Gruber, P.. Prazeller, W.. Lindinger, and A.. Amann, "Analysis of volatile organic compounds: possible applications in metabolic disorders and cancer screening.", Wien Klin Wochenschr, vol. 113, no. 5-6: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 181–185, Mar, 2001.
Abstract
The human breath contains a variety of endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The origin and pathophysiological importance of these VOCs is poorly investigated. Little is known about the interaction of VOCs from ambient air, such as those produced by plants and exhaust fumes, with the human organism. Gas chromatographic determination of VOC concentrations is tedious. Proton-transfer-mass spectroscopy (PTR-MS), a new technology for the online detection of VOC patterns, is a valuable alternative. We present two interesting molecular species, isoprene and ortho (o)-toluidine, as examples of endogenously produced VOCs. In a case study, breath isoprene reductions during lipid-lowering therapy (36%) were shown to correlate with cholesterol (32%) and LDL concentrations (35%) in blood (p < 0.001) over a period of 15 days. Therefore, isoprene concentrations in human breath (measured by PTR-MS) might serve as an additional parameter to complement invasive tests for controlling lipid-lowering therapy. Furthermore, it may be a useful parameter for lipid disorder screening. Mass-108, which presumably represents o-toluidine in our breath samples, was found in significantly higher concentrations in the breath of patients with different tumors (1.5 +/- 0.8 ppbv) than in age-matched controls (0.24 +/- 0.1 ppbv, p < 0.001). Inflammatory reactions do not seem to alter the pattern of mass-108. Therefore, it appears to be a currently underestimated carcinoma marker that deserves further investigation.
[Williams2001] Williams, J., U. Poeschl, PJ. Crutzen, A. Hansel, R. Holzinger, C. Warneke, W. Lindinger, and J. Lelieveld, "An atmospheric chemistry interpretation of mass scans obtained from a proton transfer mass spectrometer flown over the tropical rainforest of Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 133–166, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/v26n6440307112k1.pdf
[Holzinger2001a] Holzinger, R., A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Automobile emissions of acetonitrile: Assessment of its contribution to the global source", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 187–193, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/g3rn0j32865r9220.pdf
[Rinne2001] Rinne, HJI., AB. Guenther, C. Warneke, JA. De Gouw, and SL. Luxembourg, "Disjunct eddy covariance technique for trace gas flux measurements", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 16, pp. 3139–3142, 2001.
Link: http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0116/2001GL012900/pdf/2001GL012900.pdf
[Karl2001a] Karl, T., A. Guenther, A. Jordan, R. Fall, and W. Lindinger, "Eddy covariance measurement of biogenic oxygenated VOC emissions from hay harvesting", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 491–495, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231000004052
Abstract
Biogenic oxygenated volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes have been directly measured by eddy covariance using the combination of a fast response, real-time \{VOC\} sensor and an acoustic anemometer. \{VOC\} detection is based on proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry which has currently a response time of ca. 0.8&#xa0;s and the system is suitable for making nearly unattended, long-term and continuous measurements of \{VOC\} fluxes. The eddy covariance system has a detection limit, for most VOCs, of less than 0.1&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1. The system was field tested above a hayfield near St. Johann, Austria where cut and drying grasses released a variety of VOCs. High fluxes were observed for about 2 days after cutting and were dominated by methanol (1–8.4&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1), acetaldehyde (0.5–3&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1), hexenals (0.1–1.5&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1) and acetone (0.1–1.5&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1). The eddy covariance measurements generally agreed with flux estimates based on enclosure measurements and surface layer gradients. The sensitivity and selectivity of the system make it suitable for quantifying the fluxes of the dominant biogenic \{VOCs\} from a variety of landscapes and sources.
[Lindinger2001] Lindinger, W., R. Fall, and T. Karl, "Environmental, food and medical applications of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", , vol. 4: Elsevier: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp. 1-48, 2001.
Link: http://acd.ucar.edu/ tomkarl/ptrmschap.pdf
Abstract
The development of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) as a tool for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is described. PTR-MS is based on the rapid, non-dissociative transfer of protons from H3Oþ to most common VOCs, but not to the principal gases in the air sample. Recent developments in the design of PTR-MS instruments allow detection of some VOCs in the parts per trillion by volume range. This sensitivity and the capability of PTR-MS instruments to be operated for extended periods in both laboratory and field settings has allowed exploration of many aspects of VOC analysis in environmental, food and medical applications.
[Poeschl2001] Pöschl, U., J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, et al., "High acetone concentrations throughout the 0–12 km altitude range over the tropical rainforest in Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 115–132, 2001.
Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006370600615
[Karl2001] Karl, T., P. Prazeller, D. Mayr, A. Jordan, J. Rieder, R. Fall, and W. Lindinger, "Human breath isoprene and its relation to blood cholesterol levels: new measurements and modeling", Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 762-770, 2001.
Link: http://jap.physiology.org/content/91/2/762.abstract
Abstract
Numerous publications have described measurements of breath isoprene in humans, and there has been a hope that breath isoprene analyses could be a noninvasive diagnostic tool to assess blood cholesterol levels or cholesterol synthesis rate. However, significant analytic problems in breath isoprene analysis and variability in isoprene levels with age, exercise, diet, etc., have limited the usefulness of these measurements. Here, we have applied proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry to this problem, allowing on-line detection of breath isoprene. We show that breath isoprene concentration increases within a few seconds after exercise is started as a result of a rapid increase in heart rate and then reaches a lower steady state when breath rate stabilizes. Additional experiments demonstrated that increases in heart rate associated with standing after reclining or sleeping are associated with increased breath isoprene concentrations. An isoprene gas-exchange model was developed and shows excellent fit to breath isoprene levels measured during exercise. In a preliminary experiment, we demonstrated that atorvastatin therapy leads to a decrease in serum cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein levels and a parallel decrease in breath isoprene levels. This work suggests that there is constant endogenous production of isoprene during the day and night and reaffirms the possibility that breath isoprene can be a noninvasive marker of cholesterologenesis if care is taken to measure breath isoprene under standard conditions at constant heart rate.
[Lelieveld2001] J Lelieveld, others., PJ. Crutzen, V. Ramanathan, MO. Andreae, CAM. Brenninkmeijer, T. Campos, GR. Cass, RR. Dickerson, H. Fischer, JA. De Gouw, et al., "The Indian Ocean experiment: widespread air pollution from South and Southeast Asia", Science, vol. 291, no. 5506: American Association for the Advancement of Science, pp. 1031–1036, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/291/5506/1031.short
Abstract
The Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) was an international, multiplatform field campaign to measure long-range transport of air pollution from South and Southeast Asia toward the Indian Ocean during the dry monsoon season in January to March 1999. Surprisingly high pollution levels were observed over the entire northern Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone at about 6°S. We show that agricultural burning and especially biofuel use enhance carbon monoxide concentrations. Fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning cause a high aerosol loading. The growing pollution in this region gives rise to extensive air quality degradation with local, regional, and global implications, including a reduction of the oxidizing power of the atmosphere.
[Stroud2001] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, PD. Goldan, WC. Kuster, PC. Murphy, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, D. Parrish, D. Sueper, M. Trainer, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein and methylvinyl ketone, at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidants Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D8: Wiley Online Library, pp. 8035–8046, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000JD900628/full
[Warneke2001a] Warneke, C., R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, U. Poeschl, J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and isoprene related peroxides measured online over the tropical rain forest of Surinam in March 1998", Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 167–185, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/u14w8w3187r33ur2.pdf
[Wisthaler2001] Wisthaler, A., NR. Jensen, R. Winterhalter, W. Lindinger, and J. Hjorth, "Measurements of acetone and other gas phase product yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of terpenes by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 35: Elsevier, pp. 6181–6191, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231001003855
Abstract
The atmospheric oxidation of several terpenes appears to be a potentially relevant source of acetone in the atmosphere. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was used as an on-line analytical method in a chamber study to measure acetone and other gas phase products from the oxidation of α- and β-pinene initiated by OH radicals in air and in the presence of NOx. Acetone may be formed promptly, following attack by the OH radical on the terpene, via a series of highly unstable radical intermediates. It can also be formed by slower processes, via degradation of stable non-radical intermediates such as pinonaldehyde and nopinone. Primary acetone and pinonaldehyde molar yields of 11±2% (one σ) and 34±9% (one σ), respectively, were found from the reaction between α-pinene and the OH radical. After all α-pinene had been consumed, an additional formation of acetone due to the degradation of stable non-radical intermediates was observed. The total amount of acetone formed was 15±2% (one σ) of the reacted α-pinene. An upper limit of 12±3% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of pinonaldehyde was established. From the reaction between β-pinene and the OH radicals, primary acetone and nopinone molar yields of 13±2% (one σ) and 25±3% (one σ), respectively, were observed. Additional amounts of acetone were formed by the further degradation of the primary product, such as the most abundant product nopinone. The total amount of acetone formed was 16±2% (one σ) of the reacted β-pinene. An upper limit of 12±2% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of nopinone was established. The observed product yields from α- and β-pinene are in good agreement with other studies using mass-spectrometric and gas chromatographic analytical techniques, but differ significantly from previous studies using spectroscopic methods. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed.
[Warneke2001] Warneke, C., C. Van der Veen, S. Luxembourg, JA. De Gouw, and A. Kok, "Measurements of benzene and toluene in ambient air using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry: calibration, humidity dependence, and field intercomparison", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 207, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 167–182, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380601003669
[Holzinger2001] Holzinger, R., A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Methanol measurements in the lower troposphere near Innsbruck (047° 16 N; 011° 24 E), Austria", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 14: Elsevier, pp. 2525–2532, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231000004301
[Laat2001] de Laat, ATJ., JA. de Gouw, J. Lelieveld, and A. Hansel, "Model analysis of trace gas measurements and pollution impact during INDOEX", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D22: Wiley Online Library, pp. 28469–28480, 2001.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10628469D
Abstract
An analysis of acetone (CH3COCH3) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) measurements, performed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), using a chemistry general circulation model is presented. A comparison with measurements indicates that the model simulates realistic CO and acetone distributions, except toward the Indian west coast near the surface. The latter may be related to a sea breeze circulation at the Indian west coast, which is not resolved by the model. A comparison of the measured and modeled correlation between CO and acetone indicates the presence of a background marine acetone source. A model sensitivity study suggests a global marine emission strength of 15-20 Tg acetone yr-1, which is a significant contribution to the estimated global acetone source of 56 (37-80) Tg acetone yr-1. The comparison of measured and modeled CO-acetonitrile correlation from surface measurements indicates that a model sink of acetonitrile in the marine boundary layer is missing. A model sensitivity study suggests that this could be dry deposition (deposition velocity estimate: 0.01-0.05 cms-1) on the ocean surface. A comparison of measured and modeled tropospheric acetonitrile indicates that the model overestimates the free tropospheric acetonitrile mixing ratios up to a factor of 3, which points to a missing free tropospheric sink of acetonitrile in the model. A possible explanation may be stratospheric loss and subsequent stratosphere-troposphere exchange, which was not included in the model.
[Gasperi2001] Gasperi, F., G. Gallerani, A. Boschetti, F. Biasioli, A. Monetti, E. Boscaini, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, and S. Iannotta, "The mozzarella cheese flavour profile: a comparison between judge panel analysis and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, vol. 81, no. 3: Wiley Online Library, pp. 357–363, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/1097-0010(200102)81:3%3C357::AID-JSFA818%3E3.0.CO;2-O/full
[Fay2001] Fay, L. B., C. Yeretzian, and I. Blank, "Novel mass spectrometry methods in flavour analysis", CHIMIA International Journal for Chemistry, vol. 55, no. 5: Swiss Chemical Society, pp. 429–434, 2001.
Link: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/scs/chimia/2001/00000055/00000005/art00009
Abstract
Flavour research is a demanding domain in terms of analytical methodology as key odorants usually occur in trace amounts, often embedded in extracts containing volatile compounds at much higher concentrations. Since its early days, GC-MS has been a key tool in flavour laboratories enabling characterisation of thousands of volatile components in food products. However, as flavour chemists delve deeper into the understanding of flavour generation and delivery, there is a need for more powerful methodologies adapted to their specific needs. This paper will present two techniques that allow flavour separation and characterisation, namely GC-TOFMS and MS/MS. Moreover, APCI-MS, PTR-MS and REMPI-TOFMS will be discussed as they enable direct investigation of volatile compounds without any chromatographic step, thus studying release of flavour compounds during food processing or food consumption.
[Buettner2001] Buettner, A., A. Beer, C. Hannig, and M. Settles, "Observation of the swallowing process by application of videofluoroscopy and real-time magnetic resonance imaging�consequences for retronasal aroma stimulation", Chemical senses, vol. 26, no. 9: Oxford Univ Press, pp. 1211–1219, 2001.
Link: http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/9/1211.short
Abstract
The process of eating and drinking was observed in vivo by application of videofluoroscopy, a dynamic X-ray technique, as well as real-time magnetic resonance imaging. The study was aimed at elucidating the timing and performance of the physiological organs involved in mastication and swallowing, mainly the tongue, the pharynx and the soft palate (velum palatinum). It was shown for the first time that effective physiological barriers do exist during food consumption that are capable of retaining volatiles such as helium within the oral cavity. These barriers allow the access of odorants to the nasal cavity only at certain times during the eating process. Their effectiveness is related to the texture of the food as well as the amount of food material present in the oral cavity and, thereby, directly influences retronasal aroma perception.
[Warneke2001b] Warneke, C., and JA. De Gouw, "Organic trace gas composition of the marine boundary layer over the northwest Indian Ocean in April 2000", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 34: Elsevier, pp. 5923–5933, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231001003843
[Andreae2001] Andreae, MO., P. Artaxo, H. Fischer, , J-M. Grégoire, A. Hansel, P. Hoor, R. Kormann, R. Krejci, L. Lange, et al., "Transport of biomass burning smoke to the upper troposphere by deep convection in the equatorial region", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 6: Wiley Online Library, pp. 951–954, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000GL012391/full
[Karl2001b] Karl, T., P. J. Crutzen, M. Mandl, M. Staudinger, A. Guenther, A. Jordan, R. Fall, and W. Lindinger, "Variability-lifetime relationship of VOCs observed at the Sonnblick Observatory 1999�Estimation of HO-densities", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 31: Elsevier, pp. 5287–5300, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231001003417
Abstract
An extensive dataset of VOC measurements was collected at the Sonnblick Observatory, Austria (3106 m) in Fall/Winter 1999/2000, showing high mixing ratios of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs at this high altitude site due to upward mixing of air masses (Geophys. Res. Lett. 2F (2001) 507). Here we give an interpretation of proton-transfer-reaction (PTR-MS) mass scans obtained in November 1999 based on fragmentation data, GC-PTR-MS analysis and the variability-lifetime relationship, described by the power law, σ(ln(x))=Aτ−b. The variability-lifetime plot of anthropogenic VOCs gave a proportionality factor A of 1.40 and a,b exponent (sink term) of 0.44 and allowed an estimate of average HO-densities on the order of (1.5±0.4)×105 molecules cm−3. Additionally we were able to indirectly determine a diurnal HO-profile with peak values of (1.3±0.5)×106 molecules cm−3 around midday. HO-reaction rate coefficients for higher aldehydes (heptanal to nonanal) were estimated due to photochemical losses during a stagnant air episode (27 November) and from the variability-lifetime relationship. Combining long term PTR-MS analysis of VOCs and the variability-lifetime method provides a valuable tool for assessing the dominant cause of the variability in VOC concentrations. This information is essential in understanding the sources and photochemical processing of VOCs detected in ambient air at field measurement sites.
2000
[Holzinger2000] Holzinger, R., L. Sandoval-Soto, S. Rottenberger, PJ. Crutzen, J. Kesselmeier, and , "Emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus ilex L. measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry under different environmental conditions", Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 105, no. D16, pp. 20573–20579, 2000.
Link: http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/jd0016/2000JD900296/pdf/2000JD900296.pdf
[Crutzen2000] Crutzen, PJ., J. Williams, U. Poeschl, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, B. Scheeren, et al., "High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of primary organics and their oxidation products over the tropical forests of Surinam", Atmospheric environment, vol. 34, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1161–1165, 2000.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231099004823
Abstract
Tropical forests with emissions greater than 1015 g C of reactive hydrocarbons per year strongly affect atmospheric chemistry. Here we report aircraft-borne measurements of organics during March 1998 in Surinam, a largely unpolluted region which is optimally located to study chemical processes induced by tropical forest emissions. Isoprene and its degradation products methylvinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) and possibly isoprene hydroperoxides (ISOHP), were measured in the nmol mol−1 volume mixing ratio (VMR) range, consistent with estimated emissions and model calculations. In addition, high VMRs of some non-isoprene-derived organics were measured, such as acetone (≈2–4 nmol mol1 up to 12 km altitude), an important source of HO and HO2 in the upper troposphere. Moreover, several masses were measured at significant mixing ratios which could not be identified by reference to previous field measurements or gas-phase isoprene chemistry. High VMRs, almost 0.4 nmol mol−1, were also recorded for a compound which is most likely dimethyl sulphide (DMS). If so, boundary layer loss of HO by reactions with hydrocarbons and their oxidation products strongly prolongs the lifetime of DMS, allowing its transport deep into the Amazon forest south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). We postulate greater sulphate production and deposition north than south of the (ITCZ) with possible consequences for cloud and ecosystem properties.
[Hansel2000] Hansel, A., and A. Wisthaler, "A method for real-time detection of PAN, PPN and MPAN in ambient air", Geophysical research letters, vol. 27, no. 6: Wiley Online Library, pp. 895–898, 2000.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/1999GL010989/full
[Yeretzian2000] Yeretzian, C., A. Jordan, H. Brevard, and W. Lindinger, "On-line monitoring of coffee roasting by proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry", ACS Symposium Series, vol. 763: ACS Publications, pp. 112–125, 2000.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2000-0763.ch010

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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