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Found 775 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
2006
[Aprea2006] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, G. Sani, C. Cantini, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) headspace analysis for rapid detection of oxidative alteration of olive oil.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 54, no. 20: Agri-Food Quality Department, IASMA Research Center, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all'Adige (TN), Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 7635–7640, Oct, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf060970r
Abstract
Olive oil has been characterized by rapid proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) headspace analysis without any concentration of the volatiles or pretreatment of the samples. Comparison of extra virgin and defective (rancid) samples, as described by a panel of sensory judges, and the monitoring of thermo-oxidation processes are discussed. Multivariate analysis of PTR-MS data has been carried out and cross-validated, providing (i) reliable classification models for extra virgin oil as opposed to defective oil and (ii) calibration models able to predict independently thermo-oxidative degradation and the corresponding peroxide value. PTR-MS fragmentation patterns of volatiles considered in this study are also reported.
[Inomata2006] Inomata, S., H. Tanimoto, S. Kato, J. Suthawaree, Y. Kanaya, P. Pochanart, Y. Liu, and Z. Wang, "PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China", : June, 2006.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/9/26697/2009/
Abstract
Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we continuously measured non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006), using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z 17 to m/z 300 during 12–30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001) and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007) and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007).
[Maerk2006] Märk, J., P. Pollien, C. Lindinger, I. Blank, and T. Märk, "Quantitation of furan and methylfuran formed in different precursor systems by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 54, no. 7: Nestlé Research Center, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland., pp. 2786–2793, Apr, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf052937v
Abstract
Furan has recently received attention as a possibly hazardous compound occurring in certain thermally processed foods. Previous model studies have revealed three main precursor systems producing furan upon thermal treatment, i.e., ascorbic acid, Maillard precursors, and polyunsaturated lipids. We employed proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) as an on-line monitoring technique to study furan formation. Unambiguous identification and quantitation in the headspace was achieved by PTR-MS/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupling. Ascorbic acid showed the highest potential to generate furan, followed by glyceryl trilinolenate. Some of the reaction samples generated methylfuran as well, such as Maillard systems containing alanine and threonine as well as lipids based on linolenic acid. The furan yields from ascorbic acid were lowered in an oxygen-free atmosphere (30%) or in the presence of reducing agents (e.g., sulfite, 60%), indicating the important role of oxidation steps in the furan formation pathway. Furthermore, already simple binary mixtures of ascorbic acid and amino acids, sugars, or lipids reduced furan by 50-95%. These data suggest that more complex reaction systems result in much lower furan amounts as compared to the individual precursors, most likely due to competing reaction pathways.
[Gross2006] Gross, D. S., M. E. Gälli, M. Kalberer, A. S. H. Prevot, J. Dommen, R. M Alfarra, J. Duplissy, K. Gaeggeler, A. Gascho, A. Metzger, et al., "Real-time measurement of oligomeric species in secondary organic aerosol with the aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer", Analytical chemistry, vol. 78, no. 7: ACS Publications, pp. 2130–2137, 2006.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ac060138l
[Granitto2006] Granitto, P. M., C. Furlanello, F. Biasioli, and F. Gasperi, "Recursive feature elimination with random forest for PTR-MS analysis of agroindustrial products", Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, vol. 83, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 83–90, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169743906000232
Abstract
In this paper we apply the recently introduced Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) algorithm to the identification of relevant features in the spectra produced by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) analysis of agroindustrial products. The method is compared with the more traditional Support Vector Machine-Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE), extended to allow multiclass problems, and with a baseline method based on the Kruskal–Wallis statistic (KWS). In particular, we apply all selection methods to the discrimination of nine varieties of strawberries and six varieties of typical cheeses from Trentino Province, North Italy. Using replicated experiments we estimate unbiased generalization errors. Our results show that RF-RFE outperforms SVM-RFE and KWS on the task of finding small subsets of features with high discrimination levels on PTR-MS data sets. We also show how selection probabilities and features co-occurrence can be used to highlight the most relevant features for discrimination.
[Graus2006] Graus, M., A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, C. Lindinger, R. Forkel, K. Hauff, M. Klauer, A. Pfichner, B. Rappenglück, D. Steigner, et al., "A relaxed-eddy-accumulation method for the measurement of isoprenoid canopy-fluxes using an online gas-chromatographic technique and PTR-MS simultaneously", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 43–54, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003190
Abstract
A relaxed-eddy-accumulation set-up using an online gas-chromatographic technique and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was applied to determine isoprenoid fluxes above a Norway spruce forest in July 2001/2002. The system was quality assured and its suitability for determination of canopy fluxes of isoprenoids was demonstrated. Flux measurements of oxygenated hydrocarbons failed the data quality check due to artefacts presumably arising from line and ozone-scrubber effects. Observations of turbulent fluxes of isoprenoids during the two field experiments show good agreements with primary flux data derived from enclosure measurements and modelling results using a canopy-chemistry emission model (CACHE).
[Mestres2006] Mestres, M., R. Kieffer, and A. Buettner, "Release and perception of ethyl butanoate during and after consumption of whey protein gels: relation between textural and physiological parameters.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 54, no. 5: Facultat d'Enologia, Dept Química Analítica i Orgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain., pp. 1814–1821, Mar, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0517501
Abstract
The influence of gel texture on parameters such as positioning of food material in the oral cavity during mastication, and salivation, and their influence on aroma release in vivo was studied. Retronasal perception was followed by means of time-resolved sensory evaluation, while volatile release patterns were observed by means of PTR-MS. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective sensory perception. Also, gel texture could be clearly correlated with respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo and to the corresponding retronasal aroma perception.
[1501] Holzinger, R.., A.. Lee, M.. McKay, and A.. H. Goldstein, "Seasonal variability of monoterpene emission factors for a ponderosa pine plantation in California", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 6, pp. 1267–1274, Apr, 2006.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/seasonal.pdf
Abstract
<p>Monoterpene fluxes have been measured over an 11 month period from June 2003 to April 2004. During all seasons ambient air temperature was the environmental factor most closely related to the measured emission rates. The monoterpene flux was modeled using a basal emission rate multiplied by an exponential function of a temperature, following the typical practice for modelling temperature dependent biogenic emissions. A basal emission of 1.0 μmol h&minus;1 m&minus;2 (at 30&deg;C, based on leaf area) and a temperature dependence (β) of 0.12&deg;C&minus;1 reproduced measured summer emissions well but underestimated spring and winter measured emissions by 60&ndash;130%. The total annual monoterpene emission may be underestimated by &nbsp;50% when using a model optimized to reproduce monoterpene emissions in summer. The long term dataset also reveals an indirect connection between non-stomatal ozone and monoterpene flux beyond the dependence on temperature that has been shown for both fluxes.</p>
[Ammann2006] Ammann, C., A. Brunner, C. Spirig, and A. Neftel, "Technical note: Water vapour concentration and flux measurements with PTR-MS", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 6, no. 12: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4643–4651, 2006.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/4643/2006/acp-6-4643-2006.pdf
[Forkel2006] Forkel, R., O. Klemm, M. Graus, B. Rappenglück, W. R. Stockwell, W. Grabmer, A. Held, A. Hansel, and R. Steinbrecher, "Trace gas exchange and gas phase chemistry in a Norway spruce forest: A study with a coupled 1-dimensional canopy atmospheric chemistry emission model", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 28–42, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003189
Abstract
Numerical modelling is an efficient tool to investigate the role of chemical degradation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) and the effect of dynamical processes on BVOC and product mixing ratios within and above forest canopies. The present study shows an application of the coupled canopy-chemistry model CACHE to a Norway spruce forest at the Waldstein (Fichtelgebirge, Germany). Simulated courses of temperature, trace gas mixing ratios, and fluxes are compared with measurements taken during the BEWA2000 field campaigns. The model permits the interpretation of the observed diurnal course of ozone and VOC by investigating the role of turbulent exchange, chemical formation and degradation, emission, and deposition during the course of the day. The simulation results show that BVOC fluxes into the atmosphere are 10–15% lower than the emission fluxes on branch basis due to chemical BVOC degradation within the canopy. BVOC degradation by the NO3 radical was found to occur in the lower part of the canopy also during daytime. Furthermore, the simulations strongly indicate that further research is still necessary concerning the emission and deposition of aldehydes and ketones.
[Grabmer2006] Grabmer, W., J. Kreuzwieser, A. Wisthaler, C. Cojocariu, M. Graus, H. Rennenberg, D. Steigner, R. Steinbrecher, and A. Hansel, "VOC emissions from Norway spruce ( Picea abies L.[Karst]) twigs in the field�Results of a dynamic enclosure study", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 128–137, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135223100600327X
Abstract
During the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used for online determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by Norway spruce (Picea abies L. [Karst]) twigs in a dynamic sampling enclosure. Emissions of isoprenoids (isoprene and monoterpenes) and oxygenated VOC (OVOC; acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, and ethanol) were investigated. Emissions showed clear diurnal patterns with high daytime emission rates amounting to 1.8 μg C g−1 dwt h−1 for the sum of monoterpenes and in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 μg C g−1 dwt h−1 for isoprene>acetone>ethanol>methanol. Data were used to validate existing models on isoprene and monoterpene emissions and to discuss environmental and physiological factors affecting VOC emissions. Isoprene and acetaldehyde emission rates were best modelled applying the Guenther 1993 temperature and solar radiation algorithm. Emissions of monoterpenes, acetone and ethanol were best described by a temperature-only exponential algorithm. Using these model approaches a maximum emission variability of 66% was covered (isoprene). Poor r2 values ranging from 0.15 to 0.42 were typical for oxygenated VOC emission modelling indicating the need for model improvement e.g. development of process-based models describing the emission as a result of biochemical de novo synthesis as well as physico-chemical transport properties inside the leaves.
[DeGouw2006] De Gouw, JA., C. Warneke, A. Stohl, AG. Wollny, CA. Brock, OR. Cooper, JS. Holloway, M. Trainer, FC. Fehsenfeld, EL. Atlas, et al., "Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 111, no. D10: American Geophysical Union, pp. D10303, 2006.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2005JD006175.shtml
Abstract
The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.
2005
[Aprea2005] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, G. Sani, C. Cantini, and T. D. Maerk, "Advanced oxidation in olive oil: monitoring of secondary reaction products and detection of rancid defect", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, vol. -, pp. 144, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=155
[Graus2005] Graus, M., JP. Schnitzler, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Alternative Carbon Sources for Leaf Isoprene Formation", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 19, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=30
[Mestres2005] Mestres, M., N. Moran, A. Jordan, and A. Buettner, "Aroma release and retronasal perception during and after consumption of flavored whey protein gels with different textures. 1. in vivo release analysis.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 53, no. 2: Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelchemie, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching, Germany., pp. 403–409, Jan, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf048596n
Abstract
The influence of gel texture on retronasal aroma release during mastication was followed by means of real-time proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and compared to sensory perception of overall aroma intensity. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo. A modified data analysis approach was used to monitor the aroma changes during the mastication process. It was found that the temporal resolution of the release profile played an important role in adequate description of the release processes. On the basis of this observation, a hypothesis is presented for the observed differences in intensity rating.
[DAnna2005] D'Anna, B., A. Wisthaler, Øyvind. Andreasen, A. Hansel, J. Hjorth, N. R. Jensen, C. J. Nielsen, Y. Stenstrøm, and J. Viidanoja, "Atmospheric chemistry of C3-C6 cycloalkanecarbaldehydes.", J Phys Chem A, vol. 109, no. 23: Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo, Norway. barbara.danna@kjemi.uio.no, pp. 5104–5118, Jun, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp044495g
Abstract
The rate coefficients for the gas phase reaction of NO3 and OH radicals with a series of cycloalkanecarbaldehydes have been measured in purified air at 298 +/- 2 K and 760 +/- 10 Torr by the relative rate method using a static reactor equipped with long-path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection. The values obtained for the OH radical reactions (in units of 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 2.13 +/- 0.05; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 2.66 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 3.27 +/- 0.07; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.75 +/- 0.05. The values obtained for the NO3 radical reactions (in units of 10(-14) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 0.61 +/- 0.04; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 1.99 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 2.55 +/- 0.10; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.19 +/- 0.12. Furthermore, the reaction products with OH radicals have been investigated using long-path FT-IR spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The measured carbon balances were in the range 89-97%, and the identified products cover a wide spectrum of compounds including nitroperoxycarbonyl cycloalkanes, cycloketones, cycloalkyl nitrates, multifunctional compounds containing carbonyl, hydroxy, and nitrooxy functional groups, HCOOH, HCHO, CO, and CO2.
[Penuelas2005] Penuelas, J., I. Filella, C. Stefanescu, and J. Llusià, "Caterpillars of Euphydryas aurinia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) feeding on Succisa pratensis leaves induce large foliar emissions of methanol.", New Phytol, vol. 167, no. 3: Unitat Ecofisiologia CSIC-CREAF CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain. josep.penuelas@uab.es, pp. 851–857, Sep, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01459.x
Abstract
A major new discovery made in the last decade is that plants commonly emit large amounts and varieties of volatiles after damage inflicted by herbivores, and not merely from the site of injury. However, analytical methods for measuring herbivore-induced volatiles do not usually monitor the whole range of these compounds and are complicated by the transient nature of their formation and by their chemical instability. Here we present the results of using a fast and highly sensitive proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technique that allows simultaneous on-line monitoring of leaf volatiles in the pptv (pmol mol(-1)) range. The resulting on-line mass scans revealed that Euphydryas aurinia caterpillars feeding on Succisa pratensis leaves induced emissions of huge amounts of methanol–a biogeochemically active compound and a significant component of the volatile organic carbon found in the atmosphere–and other immediate, late and systemic volatile blends (including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and lipoxygenase-derived volatile compounds). In addition to influencing neighboring plants, as well as herbivores and their predators and parasitoids, these large emissions might affect atmospheric chemistry and physics if they are found to be generalized in other plant species.
[Herndon2005] Herndon, S. C., J. T. Jayne, M. S. Zahniser, D. R. Worsnop, B. Knighton, E. Alwine, B. K. Lamb, M. Zavala, D. D. Nelson, B. J McManus, et al., "Characterization of urban pollutant emission fluxes and ambient concentration distributions using a mobile laboratory with rapid response instrumentation", Faraday Discussions, vol. 130: Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 327–339, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2005/fd/b500411j
Abstract
A large and increasing fraction of the planet’s population lives in megacities, especially in the developing world. These large metropolitan areas generally have very high levels of both gaseous and particulate air pollutants that have severe impacts on human health, ecosystem viability, and climate on local, regional, and even continental scales. Emissions fluxes and ambient pollutant concentration distributions are generally poorly characterized for large urban areas even in developed nations. Much less is known about pollutant sources and concentration patterns in the faster growing megacities of the developing world. New methods of locating and measuring pollutant emission sources and tracking subsequent atmospheric chemical transformations and distributions are required. Measurement modes utilizing an innovative van based mobile laboratory equipped with a suite of fast response instruments to characterize the complex and “nastier” chemistry of the urban boundary layer are described. Instrumentation and measurement strategies are illustrated with examples from the Mexico City and Boston metropolitan areas. It is shown that fleet average exhaust emission ratios of formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and benzene (C6H6) are substantial in Mexico City, with gasoline powered vehicles emitting higher levels normalized by fuel consumption. NH3 exhaust emissions from newer light duty vehicles in Mexico City exceed levels from similar traffic in Boston. A mobile conditional sampling air sample collection mode designed to collect samples from intercepted emission plumes for later analysis is also described.
[Lee2005] Lee, A., GW. Schade, R. Holzinger, and AH. Goldstein, "A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 505–513, 2005.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/5/505/2005/acp-5-505-2005.pdf
[Warneke2005a] Warneke, C., JA. De Gouw, ER. Lovejoy, PC. Murphy, WC. Kuster, and R. Fall, "Development of proton-transfer ion trap-mass spectrometry: On-line detection and identification of volatile organic compounds in air", Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, vol. 16, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1316–1324, 2005.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044030505002618
Abstract
We present a newly developed instrument that uses proton-transfer ion trap-mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) for on-line trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The instrument is based on the principle of proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): VOCs are ionized using PTRs and detected with a mass spectrometer. As opposed to a quadrupole mass filter in a PTR-MS, the PIT-MS instrument uses an IT-MS, which has the following advantages: (1) the ability to acquire a full mass spectrum in the same time as one mass with a quadrupole and (2) extended analytical capabilities of identifying VOCs by performing collision-induced dissociation (CID) and ion molecule reactions in the IT. The instrument described has, at its current status, limits of detection between 0.05 and 0.5 pbbv for 1-min measurements for all tested VOCs. The PIT-MS was tested in an ambient air measurement in the urban area of Boulder, Colorado, and intercompared with PTR-MS. For all measured compounds the degree of correlation between the two measurements was high (r2 > 0.85), except for acetonitrile (CH3CN), which was close to the limit of detection of the PIT-MS instrument. The two measurements agreed within less than 25%, which was within the combined measurement uncertainties. Automated CID measurements on m/z 59 during the intercomparison were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal; both are detected at m/z 59 and thus are indistinguishable in PTR-MS. It was determined that m/z 59 was mainly composed of acetone. An influence of propanal was detected only during a high pollution event. The advantages and future developments of PIT-MS are discussed.
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.
[Jacob2005] Jacob, D. J., B. D. Field, Q. Li, D. R. Blake, J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, H. B. Singh, and A. Guenther, "Global budget of methanol: Constraints from atmospheric observations", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 110, no. D8: Wiley Online Library, 2005.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2004JD005172/full
Abstract
We use a global three-dimensional model simulation of atmospheric methanol to examine the consistency between observed atmospheric concentrations and current understanding of sources and sinks. Global sources in the model include 128 Tg yr−1 from plant growth, 38 Tg yr−1 from atmospheric reactions of CH3O2 with itself and other organic peroxy radicals, 23 Tg yr−1 from plant decay, 13 Tg yr−1 from biomass burning and biofuels, and 4 Tg yr−1 from vehicles and industry. The plant growth source is a factor of 3 higher for young than from mature leaves. The atmospheric lifetime of methanol in the model is 7 days; gas-phase oxidation by OH accounts for 63% of the global sink, dry deposition to land 26%, wet deposition 6%, uptake by the ocean 5%, and aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds less than 1%. The resulting simulation of atmospheric concentrations is generally unbiased in the Northern Hemisphere and reproduces the observed correlations of methanol with acetone, HCN, and CO in Asian outflow. Accounting for decreasing emission from leaves as they age is necessary to reproduce the observed seasonal variation of methanol concentrations at northern midlatitudes. The main model discrepancy is over the South Pacific, where simulated concentrations are a factor of 2 too low. Atmospheric production from the CH3O2 self-reaction is the dominant model source in this region. A factor of 2 increase in this source (to 50–100 Tg yr−1) would largely correct the discrepancy and appears consistent with independent constraints on CH3O2 concentrations. Our resulting best estimate of the global source of methanol is 240 Tg yr−1. More observations of methanol concentrations and fluxes are needed over tropical continents. Better knowledge is needed of CH3O2 concentrations in the remote troposphere and of the underlying organic chemistry.
[Pegoraro2005] Pegoraro, E., A. Rey, G. Barron-Gafford, R. Monson, Y. Malhi, and R. Murthy, "The interacting effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, drought and leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit on ecosystem isoprene fluxes.", Oecologia, vol. 146, no. 1, pp. 120–129, Nov, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-005-0166-5
Abstract
Isoprene is the most abundant biogenic hydrocarbon released from vegetation and it plays a major role in tropospheric chemistry. Because of its link to climate change, there is interest in understanding the relationship between CO2, water availability and isoprene emission. We explored the effect of atmospheric elevated CO2 concentration and its interaction with vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and water stress, on gross isoprene production (GIP) and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) in two Populus deltoides plantations grown at ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in the Biosphere 2 Laboratory facility. Although GIP and NEE showed a similar response to light and temperature, their responses to CO2 and VPD were opposite; NEE was stimulated by elevated CO2 and depressed by high VPD, while GIP was inhibited by elevated CO2 and stimulated by high VPD. The difference in response between isoprene production and photosynthesis was also evident during water stress. GIP was stimulated in the short term and declined only when the stress was severe, whereas NEE started to decrease from the beginning of the experiment. This contrasting response led the carbon lost as isoprene in both the ambient and the elevated CO2 treatments to increase as water stress progressed. Our results suggest that water limitation can override the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 leading to increased global isoprene emissions in a climate change scenario with warmer and drier climate.
[Moser2005] Moser, B., F. Bodrogi, G. Eibl, M. Lechner, J. Rieder, and P. Lirk, "Mass spectrometric profile of exhaled breath–field study by PTR-MS.", Respir Physiol Neurobiol, vol. 145, no. 2-3: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Leopold Franzens University, Anichstr. 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria. berthold.moser@uibk.ac.at, pp. 295–300, Feb, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2004.02.002
Abstract
Recently, increased interest has focused on the diagnostic potential of volatile organic compounds (VOC) exhaled in human breath as this substance group has been conjectured in indoor air quality and disease screening. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been established as a new tool for a rapid determination of exhaled air profile. However, no investigations have been carried out into the profile of exhaled air as determined by PTR-MS. Therefore, it was the aim of the present study to determine the profile of exhaled breath in a field survey enrolling 344 persons. Analysis was performed using PTR-MS. No significant correlations with age, blood pressure, and body mass index could be observed with any molecular mass. The present study delineates possible reference values for PTR-MS investigations into exhaled air profile. In conclusion, the present study was the first to delineate mass spectrometric characteristics of an average patient sample as possible reference values.
[Reus2005] de Reus, M., H. Fischer, R. Sander, V. Gros, R. Kormann, G. Salisbury, R. Van Dingenen, J. Williams, M. Zöllner, and J. Lelieveld, "Observations and model calculations of trace gas scavenging in a dense Saharan dust plume during MINATROC", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 7: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1787–1803, 2005.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/5/1787/

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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