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2007
[Shaw2007] Shaw, S. L., F. M. Mitloehner, W. Jackson, E. J. Depeters, J. G. Fadel, P. H. Robinson, R. Holzinger, and A. H. Goldstein, "Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy cows and their waste as measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 41, no. 4: Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, Hilgard Hall, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. slshaw@alum.mit.edu, pp. 1310–1316, Feb, 2007.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es061475e
Abstract
California dairies house approximately 1.8 million lactating and 1.5 million dry cows and heifers. State air regulatory agencies view these dairies as a major air pollutant source, but emissions data are sparse, particularly for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The objective of this work was to determine VOC emissions from lactating and dry dairy cows and their waste using an environmental chamber. Carbon dioxide and methane were measured to provide context for the VOCs. VOCs were measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The compounds with highest fluxes when cows plus waste were present were methanol, acetone + propanal, dimethylsulfide, and m/z 109 (likely 4-methyl-phenol). The compounds with highest fluxes from fresh waste (urine and feces) were methanol, m/z 109, and m/z 60 (likely trimethylamine). Ethanol fluxes are reported qualitatively, and several VOCs that were likely emitted (formaldehyde, methylamine, dimethylamine) were not detectable by PTR-MS. The sum of reactive VOC fluxes measured when cows were present was a factor of 6-10 less than estimates historically used for regulatory purposes. In addition, ozone formation potentials of the dominant VOCs were -10% those of typical combustion or biogenic VOCs. Thus dairy cattle have a comparatively small impact on ozone formation per VOC mass emitted.
2008
[Ngwabie2008] Ngwabie, N. Martin, G. W. Schade, T. G. Custer, S. Linke, and T. Hinz, "Abundances and flux estimates of volatile organic compounds from a dairy cowshed in Germany", Journal of environmental quality, vol. 37, no. 2: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society, pp. 565–573, 2008.
Link: https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/jeq/abstracts/37/2/565
Abstract
Animal husbandry and manure treatment have been specifically documented as significant sources of methane, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and particulate matter. Although volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also produced, much less information exists concerning their impact. We report on chemical ionization mass spectrometry and photo-acoustic spectroscopy measurements of mixing ratios of VOCs over a 2-wk measurement period in a large cowshed at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Mariensee, Germany. The high time resolution of these measurements enables insight into the sources of the emissions in a typical livestock management setting. During feeding hours and solid manure removal, large mixing ratio spikes of several VOCs were observed and correlated with simultaneous methane, carbon dioxide, and ammonia level enhancements. The subsequent decay of cowshed concentration due to passive cowshed ventilation was used to model emission rates, which were dominated by ethanol and acetic acid, followed by methanol. Correlations of VOC mixing ratios with methane or ammonia were also used to calculate cowshed emission factors and to estimate potential nationwide VOC emissions from dairy cows. The results ranged from around 0.1 Gg carbon per year (1 Gg = 109 g) for nonanal and dimethylsulfide, several Gg carbon per year for volatile fatty acids and methanol, to over 10 Gg carbon per year of emitted ethanol. While some estimates were not consistent between the two extrapolation methods, the results indicate that animal husbandry VOC emissions are dominated by oxygenated compounds and may be a nationally but not globally significant emission to the atmosphere.
[Karl2008] Karl, T., A. Guenther, A. Turnipseed, EG. Patton, K. Jardine, and , "Chemical sensing of plant stress at the ecosystem scale", Biogeosciences Discussions, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 2381–2399, 2008.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00298013/
Abstract
Significant ecosystem-scale emissions of methylsalicylate (MeSA), a semivolatile plant hormone thought to act as the mobile signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) (Park et al., 2006), were observed in an agroforest. Our measurements show that plant internal defence mechanisms can be activated in response to temperature stress and are modulated by water availability on large scales. Highest MeSA fluxes (up to 0.25 mg/m2/h) were observed after plants experienced ambient night-time temperatures of  7.5°C followed by a large daytime temperature increase (e.g. up to 22°C). Under these conditions estimated night-time leaf temperatures were as low as  4.6°C, likely inducing a response to prevent chilling injury (Ding et al., 2002). Our observations imply that plant hormones can be a significant component of ecosystem scale volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes (e.g. as high as the total monoterpene (MT) flux) and therefore contribute to the missing VOC budget (de Carlo et al., 2004; Goldstein and Galbally, 2007). If generalized to other ecosystems and different types of stresses these findings suggest that semivolatile plant hormones have been overlooked by investigations of the impact of biogenic VOCs on aerosol formation events in forested regions (Kulmala et al., 2001; Boy et al., 2000). Our observations show that the presence of MeSA in canopy air serves as an early chemical warning signal indicating ecosystem-scale stresses before visible damage becomes apparent. As a chemical metric, ecosystem emission measurements of MeSA in ambient air could therefore support field studies investigating factors that adversely affect plant growth.
[Davison2008] Davison, B.., A.. Brunner, C.. Ammann, C.. Spirig, M.. Jocher, and A.. Neftel, "Cut-induced VOC emissions from agricultural grasslands.", Plant Biol (Stuttg), vol. 10, no. 1: Department of Environmental Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK. b.davison@lancaster.ac.uk, pp. 76–85, Jan, 2008.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-965043
Abstract
The introduction of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for fast response measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) has enabled the use of eddy covariance methods to investigate VOC fluxes on the ecosystem scale. In this study PTR-MS flux measurements of VOC were performed over agricultural grassland during and after a cut event. Selected masses detected by the PTR-MS showed fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. They were highest directly after cutting and during the hay drying phase. Simultaneously, significant fluxes of protonated ion masses 73, 81, and 83 were observed. Due to the limited identification of compounds with the PTR-MS technique, GC-MS and GC-FID-PTR-MS techniques were additionally applied. In this way, ion mass 73 could be identified as 2-butanone, mass 81 mainly as (Z)-3-hexenal, and mass 83 mainly as the sum of (Z)-3-hexenol and hexenyl acetates. Hexenal, hexenols, and the hexenyl acetates are mostly related to plant wounding during cutting. It was found that legume plants and forbs emit a higher number of different VOC species than graminoids.
[Kim2008] Kim, S., T. Karl, R. Rasmussen, E. Apel, P. Harley, S. Waldo, S. Roberts, and A. Guenther, "Emissions and Photochemistry of BVOCs in a Ponderosa Pine woodland", AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1, pp. 0057, 2008.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.A31A0057K
Abstract
We deployed two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry instruments (PTR-MS, IONICON ANALYTIK) for ambient and branch enclosure measurements at the Manitou Experimental Forest, located in the Southern Rocky Mountain area as a part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen (BEACHON) field campaign in 2008. Vegetation at the field site is dominated by Ponderosa Pine. BVOC emissions from Ponderosa Pine along with temperature, photosynthetic photon flux density (ppfd), relative humidity, and CO2 uptake were measured from two branch-enclosures (shade and sun). Diurnal variations and the emission response to environmental conditions are described and compared to existing models. In addition, we analyzed the speciation of BVOCs from enclosures by GC-MS. We will present quantitative and qualitative characteristics of BVOC emissions from Ponderosa Pine and analytical characteristics of PTR-MS such as fragmentation patterns of semi-volatile compounds (sesquiterpene, bornyl acetate etc) that we identified as major emissions from the enclosures. BVOC emissions observed in the enclosures will be quantitatively compared to BVOC distributions in ambient air. We explore the presence of possibly unidentified BVOCs in the forest canopy by examining PTR-MS mass spectra of enclosure and ambient air samples based on mass scans between 40 - 210 amu.
2009
[Davison2009] Davison, B., R. Taipale, B. Langford, P. Misztal, S. Fares, G. Matteucci, F. Loreto, JN. Cape, J. Rinne, and CN. Hewitt, "Concentrations and fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds above a Mediterranean macchia ecosystem in western Italy", Biogeosciences, vol. 6: EGU, pp. 1655–1670, 2009.
Link: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/8091/
Abstract
Emission rates and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were measured at a Mediterranean coastal site at Castelporziano, approximately 25 km south-west of Rome, between 7 May and 3 June 2007, as part of the ACCENT-VOCBAS field campaign on biosphere–atmosphere interactions. Concentrations and emission rates were measured using the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method utilizing three different proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) so allowing a comparison between the instruments. The high resolution data from the PTR-MS instruments considerably enhances the original BEMA measurements of the mid 1990s. Depending on the measurement period, the volume mixing ratios were in the range 1.6–3.5 ppbv for methanol, 0.44–1.3 ppbv for acetaldehyde, 0.96–2.1 ppbv for acetone, 0.10–0.14 ppbv for isoprene, and 0.13–0.30 ppbv for monoterpenes. A diurnal cycle in mixing ratios was apparent with daytime maxima for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and isoprene. The fluxes ranged from 370–440 μg m−2 h−1 for methanol, 180–360 μg m−2 h−1 for acetaldehyde, 180–450 μg m−2 h−1 for acetone, 71–290 μg m−2 h−1 for isoprene, and 240–860 μg m−2 h−1 for monoterpenes. From the measured flux data (7 May–3 June) an average basal emission rate for the Macchia vegetation was calculated of 430 μg m−2 h−1 for isoprene and 1100 μg m−2 h−1 for monoterpenes.
[Karl2009] Karl, T., E. Apel, A. Hodzic, DD. Riemer, DR. Blake, and C. Wiedinmyer, "Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 1: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 271–285, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/271/2009/acp-9-271-2009.html
Abstract
Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-median midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 14.1±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h, respectively. For comparison the adjusted CAM2004 emission inventory estimates toluene fluxes of 10 mg/m2/h along the footprint of the flight-track. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10–15 g/g) including the International airport (e.g. 3–5 g/g) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 g/g (3.9±0.3 g/g) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (BTEX– Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m, p, o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >87% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds in the MCMA (2–13%).
[Kameyama2009] Kameyama, S., H. Tanimoto, S. Inomata, U. Tsunogai, A. Ooki, Y. Yokouchi, S. Takeda, H. Obata, and M. Uematsu, "Equilibrator inlet-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (EI-PTR-MS) for sensitive, high-resolution measurement of dimethyl sulfide dissolved in seawater.", Anal Chem, vol. 81, no. 21: National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-8506, Japan., pp. 9021–9026, Nov, 2009.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac901630h
Abstract
We developed an equilibrator inlet-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (EI-PTR-MS) method for fast detection of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dissolved in seawater. Dissolved DMS extracted by bubbling pure nitrogen through the sample was continuously directed to the PTR-MS instrument. The equilibration of DMS between seawater and the carrier gas, and the response time of the system, were evaluated in the laboratory. DMS reached equilibrium with an overall response time of 1 min. The detection limit (50 pmol L(-1) at 5 s integration) was sufficient for detection of DMS concentrations in the open ocean. The EI-PTR-MS instrument was deployed during a research cruise in the western North Pacific Ocean. Comparison of the EI-PTR-MS results with results obtained by means of membrane tube equilibrator-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry agreed reasonably well on average (R(2) = 0.99). EI-PTR-MS captured temporal variations of dissolved DMS concentrations, including elevated peaks associated with patches of high biogenic activity. These results demonstrate that the EI-PTR-MS technique was effective for highly time-resolved measurements of DMS in the open ocean. Further measurements will improve our understanding of the biogeochemical mechanisms of the production, consumption, and distribution of DMS on the ocean surface and, hence, the air-sea flux of DMS, which is a climatically important species.
[Eerdekens2009a] Eerdekens, G., L. Ganzeveld, V-G. J de Arellano, T. Klüpfel, V. Sinha, N. Yassaa, J. Williams, H. Harder, D. Kubistin, M. Martinez, et al., "Flux estimates of isoprene, methanol and acetone from airborne PTR-MS measurements over the tropical rainforest during the GABRIEL 2005 campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 13: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4207–4227, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/4207/2009/acp-9-4207-2009.html
Abstract
Tropical forests are a strong source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to the atmosphere which can potentially impact the atmospheric oxidation capacity. Here we present airborne and ground-based BVOC measurements representative for the long dry season covering a large area of the northern Amazonian rainforest (6–3° N, 50–59° W). The measurements were conducted during the October 2005 GABRIEL (Guyanas Atmosphere-Biosphere exchange and Radicals Intensive Experiment with the Learjet) campaign. The vertical (35 m to 10 km) and diurnal (09:00–16:00) profiles of isoprene, its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone and methanol and acetone, measured by PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry), have been used to empirically estimate their emission fluxes from the forest canopy on a regional scale. The mixed layer isoprene emission flux, inferred from the airborne measurements above 300 m, is 5.7 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 after compensating for chemistry and  6.9 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 taking detrainment into account. This surface flux is in general agreement with previous tropical forest studies. Inferred methanol and acetone emission fluxes are 0.5 mg methanol m−2 h−1 and 0.35 mg acetone m−2 h−1, respectively. The BVOC measurements were compared with fluxes and mixing ratios simulated with a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM). The inferred isoprene flux is substantially smaller than that simulated with an implementation of a commonly applied BVOC emission algorithm in the SCM.
[Kim2009a] Kim, S., T. Karl, D. Helmig, R. Daly, R. Rasmussen, and A. Guenther, "Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 2, no. 1: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 99–112, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/2/99/2009/
Abstract
The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24) by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) was investigated. SQT calibration standards were prepared by a capillary diffusion method and the PTR-MS-estimated mixing ratios were derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants. These values were compared with mixing ratios determined by a calibrated Gas Chromatograph (GC) coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Product ion distributions from soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+), out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+), are accounted for. Considerable fragmentation of bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, cause the accuracy to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205+) is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport) research station in 2005. Inferred average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes) of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT), and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m−3 (4.5 mg m−2 h−1), 1.2 μg m−3 (0.21 mg m−2 h−1), and 0.0016 μg m−3 (0.10 mg m−2 h−1), respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly underestimated OH reactivities due to unknown terpenes above this deciduous forest. The results indicate that incorporating these MT and SQT results can resolve  30% of missing OH reactivity reported for this site.
2010
[1585] Bamberger, I.., L.. Hortnagl, R.. Schnitzhofer, M.. Graus, T.. M. Ruuskanen, M.. Muller, J.. Dunkl, G.. Wohlfahrt, and A.. Hansel, "BVOC fluxes above mountain grassland.", Biogeosciences, vol. 7, May, 2010.
Link: http://www.biogeosciences.net/7/1413/2010/bg-7-1413-2010.html
Abstract
<p>Grasslands comprise natural tropical savannah over managed temperate fields to tundra and cover one quarter of the Earth&#39;s land surface. Plant growth, maintenance and decay result in volatile organic compound (VOCs) emissions to the atmosphere. Furthermore, biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) are emitted as a consequence of various environmental stresses including cutting and drying during harvesting. Fluxes of BVOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction-mass-spectrometer (PTR-MS) over temperate mountain grassland in Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria) over one growing season (2008). VOC fluxes were calculated from the disjunct PTR-MS data using the virtual disjunct eddy covariance method and the gap filling method. Methanol fluxes obtained with the two independent flux calculation methods were highly correlated (y = 0.95&times;-0.12, R (2) = 0.92). Methanol showed strong daytime emissions throughout the growing season - with maximal values of 9.7 nmol m(-2) s(-1), methanol fluxes from the growing grassland were considerably higher at the beginning of the growing season in June compared to those measured during October (2.5 nmol m(-2) s(-1)). Methanol was the only component that exhibited consistent fluxes during the entire growing periods of the grass. The cutting and drying of the grass increased the emissions of methanol to up to 78.4 nmol m(-2) s(-1). In addition, emissions of acetaldehyde (up to 11.0 nmol m(-2) s(-1)), and hexenal (leaf aldehyde, up to 8.6 nmol m(-2) s(-1)) were detected during/after harvesting.</p>
[Bamberger2010] Bamberger, I., L. Hörtnagl, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Graus, TM. Ruuskanen, M. Müller, J. Dunkl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "BVOC fluxes above mountain grassland", Biogeosciences, vol. 7, no. 5: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1413–1424, 2010.
Link: http://www.biogeosciences.net/7/1413/2010/bg-7-1413-2010.pdf
[1584] Hörtnagl, L., R. Clement, M. Graus, A. Hammerle, A. Hansel, and G. Wohlfahrt, "Dealing with disjunct concentration measurements in eddy covariance applications: a comparison of available approaches.", Atmos Environ (1994), vol. 44, May, 2010.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231010001810
Abstract
<p>Using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry equipped with a quadrupol mass analyser to quantify the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations of different VOC are measured sequentially. Depending on how many VOC species are targeted and their respective integration times, each VOC is measured at repeat rates on the order of a few seconds. This represents an order of magnitude longer sample interval compared to the standard eddy covariance (EC) method (5-20 Hz sampling rates). Here we simulate the effect of disjunct sampling on EC flux estimates by decreasing the time resolution of CO2 and H2O concentrations measured at 20 Hz above a temperate mountain grassland in the Austrian Alps. Fluxes for one month are calculated with the standard EC method and compared to fluxes calculated based on the disjunct data (1, 3 and 5 s sampling rates) using the following approaches: i) imputation of missing concentrations based on the nearest neighbouring samples (iDECnn), ii) imputation by linear interpolation (iDECli), and iii) virtual disjunct EC (vDEC), i.e. flux calculation based solely on the disjunct concentrations. It is shown that the two imputation methods result in additional low-pass filtering, longer lag times (as determined with the maximum cross-correlation method) and a flux loss of 3-30 % as compared to the standard EC method. A novel procedure, based on a transfer function approach, which specifically corrects for the effect of data treatment, was developed, resulting in improved correspondence (to within 2 %). The vDEC method yields fluxes which approximate the true (20 Hz) fluxes to within 3-7 % and it is this approach we recommend because it involves no additional empirical corrections. The only drawback of the vDEC method is the noisy nature of the cross-correlations, which poses problems with lag determination - practical approaches to overcome this limitation are discussed.</p>
[Karl2010] Karl, T., P. Harley, L. Emmons, B. Thornton, A. Guenther, C. Basu, A. Turnipseed, and K. Jardine, "Efficient atmospheric cleansing of oxidized organic trace gases by vegetation", Science, vol. 330, no. 6005: American Association for the Advancement of Science, pp. 816–819, 2010.
Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6005/816.short
Abstract
The biosphere is the major source and sink of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. Gas-phase chemical reactions initiate the removal of these compounds from the atmosphere, which ultimately proceeds via deposition at the surface or direct oxidation to carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide. We performed ecosystem-scale flux measurements that show that the removal of oxygenated VOC via dry deposition is substantially larger than is currently assumed for deciduous ecosystems. Laboratory experiments indicate efficient enzymatic conversion and potential up-regulation of various stress-related genes, leading to enhanced uptake rates as a response to ozone and methyl vinyl ketone exposure or mechanical wounding. A revised scheme for the uptake of oxygenated VOCs, incorporated into a global chemistry-transport model, predicts appreciable regional changes in annual dry deposition fluxes.
[Mueller2010] Müller, M., M. Graus, TM. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, I. Bamberger, L. Kaser, T. Titzmann, L. Hoertnagl, G. Wohlfahrt, T. Karl, et al., "First eddy covariance flux measurements by PTR-TOF", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 3, pp. 387–395, 2010.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AMT.....3..387M
Abstract
We have developed a High-Temperature Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (HT-PTR-MS) in which both the ion source and the ion drift tube can be continuously operated at temperatures up to 250 °C. The instrument was characterized in a high E/N-mode (130 Td) and in a low E/N-mode (87 Td) at an operating temperature of 200 °C. Instrumental sensitivities and 2σ-detection limits were on the order of 50–110 cps/ppb and 100 ppt (1 s signal integration time), respectively. The HT-PTR-MS is primarily intended for measuring "sticky" or semi-volatile trace gases. Alternatively, it may be coupled to a particle collection/thermal desorption apparatus to measure particle-bound organics in near real-time. In view of these applications, we have measured instrumental response times for a series of reference compounds. 1/e2-response times for dimethyl sulfoxide, ammonia and monoethanolamine were in the sub-second to second regime. 1/e2-response times for levoglucosan, oxalic acid and cis-pinonic acid ranged from 8 to 370 s.
[1493] Langford, B.., P.. K. Misztal, E.. Nemitz, B.. Davison, C.. Helfter, T.. A. M. Pugh, A.. R. MacKenzie, S.. F. Lim, and C.. N. Hewitt, "Fluxes and concentrations of volatile organic compounds from a South-East Asian tropical rainforest", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 10, pp. 8391–8412, 2010.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/8391/2010/
Abstract
<p>As part of the OP3 field study of rainforest atmospheric chemistry, above-canopy fluxes of isoprene, monoterpenes and oxygenated volatile organic compounds were made by virtual disjunct eddy covariance from a South-East Asian tropical rainforest in Malaysia. Approximately 500 hours of flux data were collected over 48 days in April&ndash;May and June&ndash;July 2008. Isoprene was the dominant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted from the forest, accounting for 80% (as carbon) of the measured emission of reactive carbon fluxes. Total monoterpene emissions accounted for 18% of the measured reactive carbon flux. There was no evidence for nocturnal monoterpene emissions and during the day their flux rate was dependent on both light and temperature. The oxygenated compounds, including methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde, contributed less than 2% of the total measured reactive carbon flux. The sum of the VOC fluxes measured represents a 0.4% loss of daytime assimilated carbon by the canopy, but atmospheric chemistry box modelling suggests that most (90%) of this reactive carbon is returned back to the canopy by wet and dry deposition following chemical transformation. The emission rates of isoprene and monoterpenes, normalised to 30 &deg;C and 1000 μmol m&minus;2 s&minus;1 PAR, were 1.6 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 and 0.46mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 respectively, which was 4 and 1.8 times lower respectively than the default value for tropical forests in the widely-used MEGAN model of biogenic VOC emissions. This highlights the need for more direct canopy-scale flux measurements of VOCs from the world&#39;s tropical forests.</p>
[Taipale2010] Taipale, R., T. M. Ruuskanen, and J. Rinne, "Lag time determination in DEC measurements with PTR-MS", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions, vol. 3, no. 1: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 405–429, 2010.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech-discuss.net/3/405/2010/
Abstract
The disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) method has emerged as a popular technique for micrometeorological flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It has usually been combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), an online technique for VOC concentration measurements. However, the determination of the lag time between wind and concentration measurements has remained an important challenge. To address this conundrum, we studied the effect of different lag time methods on DEC fluxes. The analysis was based on both actual DEC measurements with PTR-MS and simulated DEC data derived from high frequency H2O measurements with an infrared gas analyzer. Conventional eddy covariance fluxes of H2O served as a reference in the DEC simulation. The individual flux measurements with PTR-MS were rather sensitive to the lag time methods, but typically this effect averaged out when the median fluxes were considered. The DEC simulation revealed that the maximum covariance method was prone to overestimation of the absolute values of fluxes. The constant lag time methods, one resting on a value calculated from the sampling flow and the sampling line dimensions and the other on a typical daytime value, had a tendency to underestimate. The visual assessment method and our new averaging approach based on running averaged covariance functions did not yield statistically significant errors and thus fared better than the habitual choice, the maximum covariance method. Given this feature and the potential for automatic flux calculation, we recommend using the averaging approach in DEC measurements with PTR-MS.
[Ghirardo2010a] Ghirardo, A., K. Koch, R. Taipale, I. Zimmer, J-P. Schnitzler, and J. Rinne, "Monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions", EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, vol. 12, pp. 2448, 2010.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.2448G
Abstract
Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58 %, Picea abies 33.5 %, Larix decidua 9.8 %) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. We have also measured the ecosystem scale monoterpene emission fluxes from a boreal Pinus sylvestris forest by disjunct eddy covariance technique. Application of the observed fraction of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions, as compared to the measured fluxes.
[Ruuskanen2010] Ruuskanen, TM., M. Müller, R. Schnitzhofer, T. Karl, M. Graus, I. Bamberger, L. Hoertnagl, F. Brilli, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "VOC Emission and Deposition Eddy Covariance Fluxes above Grassland using PTR-TOF", AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1, pp. 0219, 2010.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.A53C0219R
Abstract
Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5-20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ - water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. The smallest reliable fluxes we determined were less than 0.1 nmol m-2 s-1, as in the case of sesquiterpene emissions from freshly cut grass. Terpenoids, including mono- and sesquiterpenes, were also deposited to the grassland before and after the harvesting. During cutting, total VOC emission fluxes up to 200 nmolC m-2 s-1 were measured. Methanol emissions accounted for half of the emissions of oxygenated VOCs and a third of the carbon of all measured VOC emissions during harvesting.
2011
[Ghirardo2011] Ghirardo, A., J. Gutknecht, I. Zimmer, N. Brueggemann, and J-P. Schnitzler, "Biogenic volatile organic compound and respiratory CO2 emissions after 13C-labeling: online tracing of C translocation dynamics in poplar plants.", PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 2: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany., pp. e17393, 2011.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0017393
Abstract
Globally plants are the primary sink of atmospheric CO(2), but are also the major contributor of a large spectrum of atmospheric reactive hydrocarbons such as terpenes (e.g. isoprene) and other biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). The prediction of plant carbon (C) uptake and atmospheric oxidation capacity are crucial to define the trajectory and consequences of global environmental changes. To achieve this, the biosynthesis of BVOC and the dynamics of C allocation and translocation in both plants and ecosystems are important.We combined tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for studying isoprene biosynthesis and following C fluxes within grey poplar (Populus x canescens) saplings. This was achieved by feeding either (13)CO(2) to leaves or (13)C-glucose to shoots via xylem uptake. The translocation of (13)CO(2) from the source to other plant parts could be traced by (13)C-labeled isoprene and respiratory (13)CO(2) emission.In intact plants, assimilated (13)CO(2) was rapidly translocated via the phloem to the roots within 1 hour, with an average phloem transport velocity of 20.3 ± 2.5 cm h(-1). (13)C label was stored in the roots and partially reallocated to the plants' apical part one day after labeling, particularly in the absence of photosynthesis. The daily C loss as BVOC ranged between 1.6% in mature leaves and 7.0% in young leaves. Non-isoprene BVOC accounted under light conditions for half of the BVOC C loss in young leaves and one-third in mature leaves. The C loss as isoprene originated mainly (76-78%) from recently fixed CO(2), to a minor extent from xylem-transported sugars (7-11%) and from photosynthetic intermediates with slower turnover rates (8-11%).We quantified the plants' C loss as respiratory CO(2) and BVOC emissions, allowing in tandem with metabolic analysis to deepen our understanding of ecosystem C flux.
[1587] Hörtnagl, L., I. Bamberger, M. Graus, T. M. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, A. Hansel, and G. Wohlfahrt, "Biotic, abiotic and management controls on methanol exchange above a temperate mountain grassland.", J Geophys Res Biogeosci, vol. 116, Sep, 2011.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2011jg001641
Abstract
<p>Methanol (CH3OH) fluxes were quantified above a managed temperate mountain grassland in the Stubai Valley (Tyrol, Austria) during the growing seasons 2008 and 2009. Half-hourly methanol fluxes were calculated by means of the virtual disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) method using 3-dimensional wind data from a sonic anemometer and methanol volume mixing ratios measured with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). During (undisturbed) mature and growing phases methanol fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal cycle with close-to-zero fluxes during nighttime and emissions, up to 10 nmol m(-2) s(-1), which followed the diurnal course of radiation and air temperature. Management events were found to represent the largest perturbations of methanol exchange at the studied grassland ecosystem: Peak emissions of 144.5 nmol m(-2) s(-1) were found during/after cutting of the meadow reflecting the wounding of the plant material and subsequent depletion of the leaf internal aqueous methanol pools. After the application of organic fertilizer, elevated methanol emissions of up to 26.7 nmol m(-2) s(-1) were observed, likely reflecting enhanced microbial activity associated with the applied manure. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses revealed air temperature and radiation as the dominant abiotic controls, jointly explaining 47 % and 70 % of the variability in half-hourly and daily methanol fluxes. In contrast to published leaf-level laboratory studies, the surface conductance and the daily change in the amount of green plant area, used as ecosystem-scale proxies for stomatal conductance and growth, respectively, were found to exert only minor biotic controls on methanol exchange.</p>
[FeilbergTavsNyord2011] Nyord}, A. {Feilberg, M. N. Ã. ¸rrega Hansen, and S. Lindholst, "Chemical evaluation of odor reduction by soil injection of animal manure.", J Environ Qual, vol. 40, no. 5: Dep. of Biosystem Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus Univ., Denmark. anders.feilberg@agrsci.dk, pp. 1674–1682, 2011.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.2134/jeq2010.0499
Abstract
Field application of animal manure is a major cause of odor nuisance in the local environment. Therefore, there is a need for methods for measuring the effect of technologies for reducing odor after manure application. In this work, chemical methods were used to identify key odorants from field application of pig manure based on experiments with surface application by trailing hoses and soil injection. Results from three consecutive years of field trials with full-scale equipment are reported. Methods applied were: membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), gold-film hydrogen sulfide (H?S) detection, all performed on site, and thermal desorption gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) based on laboratory analyses of field samples. Samples were collected from a static flux chamber often used for obtaining samples for dynamic olfactometry. While all methods were capable of detecting relevant odorants, PTR-MS gave the most comprehensive results. Based on odor threshold values, 4-methylphenol, H?S, and methanethiol are suggested as key odorants. Significant odorant reductions by soil injection were consistently observed in all trials. The flux chamber technique was demonstrated to be associated with critical errors due to compound instabilities in the chamber. This was most apparent for H?S, on a time scale of a few minutes, and on a longer time scale for methanethiol.
[1506] Wolfe, G.. M., J.. A. Thornton, N.. C. Bouvier-Brown, A.. H. Goldstein, J.-H.. Park, M.. McKay, D.. M. Matross, J.. Mao, W.. H. Brune, B.. W. LaFranchi, et al., "The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE) Model ¬タモ Part 2: Application to BEARPEX-2007 observations", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, pp. 1269–1294, Feb, 2011.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/Wolf et al acp-11-1269-2011.pdf
Abstract
<p>In a companion paper, we introduced the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE) model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. Here, we apply CAFE to noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007). In this work we evaluate the CAFE modeling approach, demonstrate the significance of in-canopy chemistry for forest-atmosphere exchange and identify key shortcomings in the current understanding of intra-canopy processes. CAFE generally reproduces BEARPEX-2007 observations but requires an enhanced radical recycling mechanism to overcome a factor of 6 underestimate of hydroxyl (OH) concentrations observed during a warm (&nbsp;29 &deg;C) period. Modeled fluxes of acyl peroxy nitrates (APN) are quite sensitive to gradients in chemical production and loss, demonstrating that chemistry may perturb forest-atmosphere exchange even when the chemical timescale is long relative to the canopy mixing timescale. The model underestimates peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) fluxes by 50% and the exchange velocity by nearly a factor of three under warmer conditions, suggesting that near-surface APN sinks are underestimated relative to the sources. Nitric acid typically dominates gross dry N deposition at this site, though other reactive nitrogen (NOy) species can comprise up to 28% of the N deposition budget under cooler conditions. Upward NO2 fluxes cause the net above-canopy NOy flux to be &nbsp;30% lower than the gross depositional flux. CAFE under-predicts ozone fluxes and exchange velocities by &nbsp;20%. Large uncertainty in the parameterization of cuticular and ground deposition precludes conclusive attribution of non-stomatal fluxes to chemistry or surface uptake. Model-measurement comparisons of vertical concentration gradients for several emitted species suggests that the lower canopy airspace may be only weakly coupled with the upper canopy. Future efforts to model forest-atmosphere exchange will require a more mechanistic understanding of non-stomatal deposition and a more thorough characterization of in-canopy mixing processes.</p>
[Bamberger2011] Bamberger, I., L. Hörtnagl, TM. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, M. Graus, T. Karl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Deposition fluxes of terpenes over grassland", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 116, no. D14: Wiley Online Library, 2011.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2010JD015457/full
Abstract
Eddy covariance flux measurements were carried out for two subsequent vegetation periods above a temperate mountain grassland in an alpine valley using a proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a PTR time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF). In 2008 and during the first half of the vegetation period 2009 the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for the sum of monoterpenes (MTs) were typically well below 1 ppbv and neither MT emission nor deposition was observed. After a hailstorm in July 2009 an order of magnitude higher amount of terpenes was transported to the site from nearby coniferous forests causing elevated VMRs. As a consequence, deposition fluxes of terpenes to the grassland, which continued over a time period of several weeks without significant reemission, were observed. For days without precipitation the deposition occurred at velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. In addition to monoterpene uptake, deposition fluxes of the sum of sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and the sum of oxygenated terpenes (OTs) were detected. Considering an entire growing season for the grassland (i.e., 1 April to 1 November 2009), the cumulative carbon deposition of monoterpenes reached 276 mg C m−2. This is comparable to the net carbon emission of methanol (329 mg C m−2), which is the dominant nonmethane volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted from this site, during the same time period. It is suggested that deposition of monoterpenes to terrestrial ecosystems could play a more significant role in the reactive carbon budget than previously assumed.
[1492] Misztal, P.. K., E.. Nemitz, B.. Langford, C.. F. Di Marco, G.. J. Phillips, C.. N. Hewitt, A.. R. MacKenzie, S.. M. Owen, D.. Fowler, M.. R. Heal, et al., "Direct ecosystem fluxes of volatile organic compounds from oil palms in South-East Asia", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, pp. 8995–9017, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/8995/2011/
Abstract
<p>This paper reports the first direct eddy covariance fluxes of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from oil palms to the atmosphere using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), measured at a plantation in Malaysian Borneo. At midday, net isoprene flux constituted the largest fraction (84 %) of all emitted BVOCs measured, at up to 30 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 over 12 days. By contrast, the sum of its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) exhibited clear deposition of 1 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1, with a small average canopy resistance of 230 s m&minus;1. Approximately 15 % of the resolved BVOC flux from oil palm trees could be attributed to floral emissions, which are thought to be the largest reported biogenic source of estragole and possibly also toluene. Although on average the midday volume mixing ratio of estragole exceeded that of toluene by almost a factor of two, the corresponding fluxes of these two compounds were nearly the same, amounting to 0.81 and 0.76 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1, respectively. By fitting the canopy temperature and PAR response of the MEGAN emissions algorithm for isoprene and other emitted BVOCs a basal emission rate of isoprene of 7.8 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 was derived. We parameterise fluxes of depositing compounds using a resistance approach using direct canopy measurements of deposition. Consistent with Karl et al. (2010), we also propose that it is important to include deposition in flux models, especially for secondary oxidation products, in order to improve flux predictions.</p>

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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