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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 5 results
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2017
[1820] Ghude, S. D., G.. S. Bhat, T. Prabhakaran, R.. K. Jenamani, D.. M. Chate, P.. D. Safai, A.. K. Karipot, M.. Konwar, P. Pithani, V.. Sinha, et al., "Winter Fog Experiment Over the Indo-Gangetic Plains of India", Current Science, vol. 112, pp. 767, feb, 2017.
Link: http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/winter%20fog%20Indo%20Gangetic%20plain.pdf
Abstract
<p>The objectives of the Winter Fog Experiment (WIFEX) over the Indo-Gangetic Plains of India are to develop better now-casting and forecasting of winter fog on various time- and spatial scales. Maximum fog occurrence over northwest India is about 48 days (visibility &lt; 1000 m) per year, and it occurs mostly during the December-February time-period. The physical and chemical characteristics of fog, meteorological factors responsible for its genesis, sustenance, intensity and dissipation are poorly understood. Improved understanding on the above aspects is required to develop reliable forecasting models and observational techniques for accurate prediction of the fog events. Extensive sets of comprehensive groundbased instrumentation were deployed at the Indira Gandhi International Airport, New Delhi. Major in situ sensors were deployed to measure surface micrometeorological conditions, radiation balance, turbulence, thermodynamical structure of the surface layer, fog droplet and aerosol microphysics, aerosol optical properties, and aerosol and fog water chemistry to describe the complete environmental conditions under which fog develops. In addition, Weather Forecasting Model coupled with chemistry is planned for fog prediction at a spatial resolution of 2 km. The present study provides an introductory overview of the winter fog field campaign with its unique instrumentation. Winter Fog Experiment Over the Indo-Gangetic Plains of India (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314118438_Winter_Fog_Experiment_Over_the_Indo-Gangetic_Plains_of_India [accessed Aug 9, 2017].</p>
2014
[1546] Romano, A., L. Fischer, J. Herbig, H. Campbell-Sills, J. Coulon, P. Lucas, L. Cappellin, and F. Biasioli, "Wine analysis by FastGC proton-transfer reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 369, pp. 81 - 86, 2014.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380614002127
Abstract
<p>Abstract Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has successfully been applied to a wide variety of food matrices, nevertheless the reports about the use of PTR-MS in the analysis of alcoholic beverages remain anecdotal. Indeed, due to the presence of ethanol in the sample, PTR-MS can only be employed after dilution of the headspace or at the expense of radical changes in the operational conditions. In the present research work, PTR-ToF-MS was coupled to a prototype FastGC system allowing for a rapid (90&nbsp;s) chromatographic separation of the sample headspace prior to PTR-MS analysis. The system was tested on red wine: the FastGC step allowed to rule out the effect of ethanol, eluted from the column during the first 8&nbsp;s, allowing PTR-MS analysis to be carried out without changing the ionization conditions. Eight French red wines were submitted to analysis and could be separated on the basis of the respective grape variety and region of origin. In comparison to the results obtained by direct injection, FastGC provided additional information, thanks to a less drastic dilution of the sample and due to the chromatographic separation of isomers. This was achieved without increasing duration and complexity of the analysis.</p>
2012
[1510] Jardine, K. J., R. K. Monson, L. Abrell, S. R. Saleska, A. Arneth, A. Jardine, Fᅢᄃoise. Yoko Ishida, A. Maria Yane Serrano, P. Artaxo, T. Karl, et al., "Within-plant isoprene oxidation confirmed by direct emissions of oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein", Glob Change Biol, vol. 18, pp. 973–984, Mar, 2012.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/Jardine et al. 2012 GCB published.pdf
Abstract
<p>Isoprene is emitted from many terrestrial plants at high rates, accounting for an estimated 1/3 of annual global volatile organic compound emissions from all anthropogenic and biogenic sources combined. Through rapid photooxidation reactions in the atmosphere, isoprene is converted to a variety of oxidized hydrocarbons, providing higher order reactants for the production of organic nitrates and tropospheric ozone, reducing the availability of oxidants for the breakdown of radiatively active trace gases such as methane, and potentially producing hygroscopic particles that act as effective cloud condensation nuclei. However, the functional basis for plant production of isoprene remains elusive. It has been hypothesized that in the cell isoprene mitigates oxidative damage during the stress-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the products of isoprene-ROS reactions in plants have not been detected. Using pyruvate-2-13C leaf and branch feeding and individual branch and whole mesocosm flux studies, we present evidence that isoprene (i) is oxidized to methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (iox) in leaves and that iox/i emission ratios increase with temperature, possibly due to an increase in ROS production under high temperature and light stress. In a primary rainforest in Amazonia, we inferred significant in plant isoprene oxidation (despite the strong masking effect of simultaneous atmospheric oxidation), from its influence on the vertical distribution of iox uptake fluxes, which were shifted to low isoprene emitting regions of the canopy. These observations suggest that carbon investment in isoprene production is larger than that inferred from emissions alone and that models of tropospheric chemistry and biota&ndash;chemistry&ndash;climate interactions should incorporate isoprene oxidation within both the biosphere and the atmosphere with potential implications for better understanding both the oxidizing power of the troposphere and forest response to climate change.</p>
2011
[Laffineur2011] Laffineur, Q., B. Heinesch, N. Schoon, C. Amelynck, J-F. Müller, J. Dewulf, H. Van Langenhove, E. Joó, K. Steppe, and M. Aubinet, "What can we learn from year-round BVOC disjunct eddycovariance measurements? A case example from a temperate forest", 5th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications: Innsbruck university press, 2011.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_5.pdf
2008
[Lindinger2008] Lindinger, C., D. Labbe, P. Pollien, A. Rytz, M. A. Juillerat, C. Yeretzian, and I. Blank, "When machine tastes coffee: instrumental approach to predict the sensory profile of espresso coffee.", Anal Chem, vol. 80, no. 5: Nestlé Research Center, Vers-Chez-les-Blanc, 1000 Lausanne 26, Switzerland. christian.lindinger@rdls.nestle.com, pp. 1574–1581, Mar, 2008.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac702196z
Abstract
A robust and reproducible model was developed to predict the sensory profile of espresso coffee from instrumental headspace data. The model is derived from 11 different espresso coffees and validated using 8 additional espressos. The input of the model consists of (i) sensory profiles from a trained panel and (ii) on-line proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) data. The experimental PTR-MS conditions were designed to simulate those for the sensory evaluation. Sixteen characteristic ion traces in the headspace were quantified by PTR-MS, requiring only 2 min of headspace measurement per espresso. The correlation is based on a knowledge-based standardization and normalization of both datasets that selectively extracts differences in the quality of samples, while reducing the impact of variations on the overall intensity of coffees. This work represents a significant progress in terms of correlation of sensory with instrumental results exemplified on coffee.

Featured Articles

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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