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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 4 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: First Letter Of Title is M and Author is Beauchamp, Jonathan  [Clear All Filters]
2014
[1564] Smith, D., P. Spanel, J. Herbig, and J. Beauchamp, "Mass spectrometry for real-time quantitative breath analysis", Journal of Breath Research, vol. 8, pp. 027101, Mar, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/8/2/027101
Abstract
<p>Breath analysis research is being successfully pursued using a variety of analytical methods, prominent amongst which are gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, GC-MS, ion mobility spectrometry, IMS, and the fast flow and flow-drift tube techniques called selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, PTR-MS. In this paper the case is made for real-time breath analysis by obviating sample collection into bags or onto traps that can suffer from partial degradation of breath metabolites or the introduction of impurities. Real-time analysis of a broad range of volatile chemical compounds can be best achieved using SIFT-MS and PTR-MS, which are sufficiently sensitive and rapid to allow the simultaneous analyses of several trace gas metabolites in single breath exhalations. The basic principles and the ion chemistry that underpin these two analytical techniques are briefly described and the differences between them, including their respective strengths and weaknesses, are revealed, especially with reference to the analysis of the complex matrix that is exhaled breath. A recent innovation is described that combines time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the proton transfer flow-drift tube reactor, PTR-TOFMS, which provides greater resolution in the analytical mass spectrometer and allows separation of protonated isobaric molecules. Examples are presented of some recent data that well illustrate the quality and real-time feature of SIFT-MS and PTR-MS for the analysis of exhaled breath for physiological/biochemical/pharmacokinetics studies and for the identification and quantification of biomarkers relating to specific disease states.</p>
[1602] Smith, D., P. Spanel, J. Herbig, and J. Beauchamp, "Mass spectrometry for real-time quantitative breath analysis.", J Breath Res, vol. 8, pp. 027101, Jun, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/8/2/027101
Abstract
<p>Breath analysis research is being successfully pursued using a variety of analytical methods, prominent amongst which are gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, GC-MS, ion mobility spectrometry, IMS, and the fast flow and flow-drift tube techniques called selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, PTR-MS. In this paper the case is made for real-time breath analysis by obviating sample collection into bags or onto traps that can suffer from partial degradation of breath metabolites or the introduction of impurities. Real-time analysis of a broad range of volatile chemical compounds can be best achieved using SIFT-MS and PTR-MS, which are sufficiently sensitive and rapid to allow the simultaneous analyses of several trace gas metabolites in single breath exhalations. The basic principles and the ion chemistry that underpin these two analytical techniques are briefly described and the differences between them, including their respective strengths and weaknesses, are revealed, especially with reference to the analysis of the complex matrix that is exhaled breath. A recent innovation is described that combines time-of-flight mass spectrometry with the proton transfer flow-drift tube reactor, PTR-TOFMS, which provides greater resolution in the analytical mass spectrometer and allows separation of protonated isobaric molecules. Examples are presented of some recent data that well illustrate the quality and real-time feature of SIFT-MS and PTR-MS for the analysis of exhaled breath for physiological/biochemical/pharmacokinetics studies and for the identification and quantification of biomarkers relating to specific disease states.</p>
[1561] Beauchamp, J., E. Zardin, P. Silcock, and P. J. Bremer, "Monitoring photooxidation-induced dynamic changes in the volatile composition of extended shelf life bovine milk by PTR-{MS}", Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 49, pp. 952–958, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3430
Abstract
<p>Exposure of milk to light leads to photooxidation and the development of off-flavours. To follow these reactions, semi-skimmed (1.5% fat) and whole (3.8% fat) extended shelf life (ESL) bovine milk samples were exposed to fluorescent light for up to 20 h at room temperature, and the volatiles in the samples&#39; headspace were measured in real time using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Compounds tentatively identified as methanethiol, acetone/propanal, pentanal/octanal/nonanal/1-octen-3-ol, hexanal, diacetyl, dimethyl disulphide, heptanal and benzaldehyde displayed dynamic release profiles relating to the changes occurring in milk upon exposure to light. Copyright &copy; 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>
2011
[Siefarth2011a] Siefarth, C., O. Tyapkova, J. Beauchamp, U. Schweiggert, A. Buettner, and S. Bader, "Mixture design approach as a tool to study in vitro flavor release and viscosity interactions in sugar-free polyol and bulking agent solutions", Food Research International, vol. 44, no. 10: Elsevier, pp. 3202–3211, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996911004996
Abstract
Flavor release from mixtures of maltitol, erythritol, polydextrose and oligofructose dissolved in water at concentrations of 43% (w/w) was investigated to analyze possible interactions between the viscous matrix and the volatiles using an experimental mixture design in combination with data analysis and response modeling tools. The dynamic release of four flavor compounds (cis-3-hexenol, benzaldehyde, ethyl butanoate and butyl isovalerate) from the matrices at 37 °C was determined by headspace analyses using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The aim of the present study was to understand the complex release mechanisms from high-viscosity polyol and bulking agent solutions for the intention of conducting further studies on flavor release from sugar-free confectionary products. Each of the non-volatiles had a significant effect (p < 0.05) on flavor release with regression coefficients (R²) between 0.72 and 0.93 for the release parameters Imax, t½, and Δc/Δt, and 0.99 for viscosity. However, the magnitude of influence varied between the bulking agents and polyols due to their different molecular weights. A clear correlation between viscosity of the solutions and flavor release was found, revealing complex matrix-volatile interactions in the high-viscosity solutions. The release of all investigated flavor compounds decreased when the viscosity of the solutions increased. Therefore, it is assumed that the flavor release is significantly influenced by the non-volatiles when a critical concentration (c*) is exceeded. Interactions between the sugar substitutes were found to affect the viscosity of the matrices, whereas flavor release was not affected by interactions between the polyols and bulking agents investigated.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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