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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 2 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: First Letter Of Title is E and Author is Holzinger, R.  [Clear All Filters]
2012
[1512] Park, J.-H.., A.. H. Goldstein, J.. Timkovsky, S.. Fares, R.. Weber, J.. Karlik, and R.. Holzinger, "Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-{MS}): comparison with PTR-{MS} measured vertical gradients and fluxes", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, pp. 20435–20482, Aug, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acpd-12-20435-2012
Abstract
<p>During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a standard proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m Δ m&minus;1) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e. co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7.1 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), and m/z 69.071 (isoprene + 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol, 1.8%, 5.3 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). Low levels of emission and/or deposition (&lt;1.6% for each, 5.8% in total flux) were observed for the additional reported masses. Overall, our results show that EC flux measurements using PTR-TOF-MS is a powerful new tool for characterizing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange including both emission and deposition for a large range of BVOC and their oxidation products.</p>
2007
[1503] Holzinger, R.., D.. B. Millet, B.. Williams, A.. Lee, N.. Kreisberg, S.. V. Hering, J.. Jimenez, J.. D. Allan, D.. R. Worsnop, and A.. H. Goldstein, "Emission, oxidation, and secondary organic aerosol formation of volatile organic compounds as observed at Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia", Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 112, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2006JD007599
Abstract
<p>We report the detection of a class of related oxygenated compounds by proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) that have rarely or never been observed as a group using in situ instrumentation. Measurements were made as part of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) 2004 in Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia. The detected class of compounds discussed here includes acetic acid, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, tentatively identified formic acid and hydroxyacetone, and unidentified compounds detected at mass to charge ratios 85, 87, 99, 101, 113, 115, and 129. Typical concentrations were 800, 2500, 450, 700, 85, 25, 50, 50, 60, 35, 20, and 25 ppt, respectively. The uniqueness of this class of compounds is illustrated by showing they were poorly related to trace gases found in the US outflow, local pollution, primary biogenic emissions and other oxygenated compounds such as acetone, methanol, and MEK measured by other in situ instrumentation. On the other hand these oxidized volatile organic compounds were related to chemical species in aerosols and their abundance was high during nucleation events. Thus they likely are gas phase species that are formed in parallel to biogenic secondary organic aerosol production. We clearly show these compounds do not originate from local sources. We also show these compounds match the oxidation products of isoprene observed in smog chamber studies, and we therefore suggest they must be mainly produced by oxidation of biogenic precursor compounds.</p>

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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