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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 68 results
Title [ Year(Desc)]
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1995
[Jordan1995] Jordan, A., A. Hansel, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger, "Acetonitrile and benzene in the breath of smokers and non-smokers investigated by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, vol. 148, no. 1-2, pp. L1 - L3, 1995.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016811769504236E
Abstract
Benzene and acetonitrile are both present in greater concentrations in the breath of smokers than in non-smokers. The concentrations of these neutrals can be readily detected in the gas phase by their proton transfer reactions with H3O+. The concentration of benzene in the breath of smokers rapidly decreases with the time since the last cigarette was smoked, declining to values similar to those of non-smokers within an hour. In contrast, the concentration of acetonitrile in the breath of smokers takes nearly a week to decrease to that of non-somokers, once smoking stops. Thus the analysis of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator of whether a given subject is or is not a smoker.
1996
[Taucher1996] Taucher, J., A. Hansel, A. Jordan, and W. Lindinger, "Analysis of compounds in human breath after ingestion of garlic using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry", Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, vol. 44, no. 12: ACS Publications, pp. 3778–3782, 1996.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf960640e
Abstract
After ingestion of raw garlic, the components allyl methyl sulfide (1), allyl methyl disulfide (2), diallyl sulfide (3), diallyl disulfide (4), diallyl trisulfide (7), dimethyl sulfide (8), and acetone (9) in the breath of a test person were analyzed over a time period of about 30 h by means of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. While the concentrations of 2−7 reached maxima shortly after ingestion of garlic and declined to baseline values within the next 2−3 h, concentrations of 1, 8, and 9 increased much more slowly and showed enhanced values even 30 h after garlic consumption. The strong increase of the concentration of acetone might be indicative of enhanced metabolism of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and total lipids in the blood stream.
1997
[Lindinger1997a] Lindinger, W., and A. Hansel, "Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Plasma Sources Science and Technology, vol. 6, no. 2: IOP Publishing, pp. 111, 1997.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/6/2/004
Abstract
A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical applications by means of breath analysis, examples of environmental trace gas analysis and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method.
1999
[Warneke1999] Warneke, C., T. Karl, H. Judmaier, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, and P. J. Crutzen, "Acetone, methanol, and other partially oxidized volatile organic emissions from dead plant matter by abiological processes: Significance for atmospheric HOx chemistry", Global Biogeochem. Cycles, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 9–17, 1999.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/98GB02428/full
[Prazeller1999] Prazeller, P., K. Thomas, A. Jordan Arm Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Acetonitril als Biomarker zur Quantifizierung des Passivrauchens", Ber. nat-med. Verein Innsbruck, vol. 86: Ber. nat-.med. Verein Innsbruck, pp. 13-19, 1999.
Link: http://www.landesmuseum.at/pdf_frei_remote/BERI_86_0013-0019.pdf
2001
[Sprung2001] Sprung, D., C. Jost, T. Reiner, A. Hansel, and A. Wisthaler, "Acetone and acetonitrile in the tropical Indian Ocean boundary layer and free troposphere: Aircraft-based intercomparison of AP-CIMS and PTR-MS measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D22: Wiley Online Library, pp. 28511–28527, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000JD900599/full
[Rieder2001] Rieder, J.., P.. Lirk, C.. Ebenbichler, G.. Gruber, P.. Prazeller, W.. Lindinger, and A.. Amann, "Analysis of volatile organic compounds: possible applications in metabolic disorders and cancer screening.", Wien Klin Wochenschr, vol. 113, no. 5-6: Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 181–185, Mar, 2001.
Abstract
The human breath contains a variety of endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The origin and pathophysiological importance of these VOCs is poorly investigated. Little is known about the interaction of VOCs from ambient air, such as those produced by plants and exhaust fumes, with the human organism. Gas chromatographic determination of VOC concentrations is tedious. Proton-transfer-mass spectroscopy (PTR-MS), a new technology for the online detection of VOC patterns, is a valuable alternative. We present two interesting molecular species, isoprene and ortho (o)-toluidine, as examples of endogenously produced VOCs. In a case study, breath isoprene reductions during lipid-lowering therapy (36%) were shown to correlate with cholesterol (32%) and LDL concentrations (35%) in blood (p < 0.001) over a period of 15 days. Therefore, isoprene concentrations in human breath (measured by PTR-MS) might serve as an additional parameter to complement invasive tests for controlling lipid-lowering therapy. Furthermore, it may be a useful parameter for lipid disorder screening. Mass-108, which presumably represents o-toluidine in our breath samples, was found in significantly higher concentrations in the breath of patients with different tumors (1.5 +/- 0.8 ppbv) than in age-matched controls (0.24 +/- 0.1 ppbv, p < 0.001). Inflammatory reactions do not seem to alter the pattern of mass-108. Therefore, it appears to be a currently underestimated carcinoma marker that deserves further investigation.
[Williams2001] Williams, J., U. Poeschl, PJ. Crutzen, A. Hansel, R. Holzinger, C. Warneke, W. Lindinger, and J. Lelieveld, "An atmospheric chemistry interpretation of mass scans obtained from a proton transfer mass spectrometer flown over the tropical rainforest of Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 133–166, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/v26n6440307112k1.pdf
[Holzinger2001a] Holzinger, R., A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Automobile emissions of acetonitrile: Assessment of its contribution to the global source", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 187–193, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/g3rn0j32865r9220.pdf
2002
[Hewitt2002] C Hewitt, N., S. Hayward, and A. Tani, "The application of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to the monitoring and analysis of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere", J. Environ. Monit., vol. 5, no. 1: The Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 1–7, 2002.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2003/em/b204712h
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a new and emerging technique for the measurement and monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low concentrations in gaseous samples in more-or-less real time. Utilising chemical ionisation, it combines the desirable attributes of high sensitivity and short integration times with good precision and accuracy. Recently it has been exploited in applications related to atmospheric science. Here, the principles of operation of the PTR-MS are described, its advantages and disadvantages discussed, its inherent uncertainties highlighted, some of its uses in atmospheric sciences reviewed, and some suggestions made on its future application to atmospheric chemistry.
2003
[Pollien2003a] Pollien, P., C. Lindinger, S. Ali, and C. Yeretzian, "Absolute quantification of headspace volatiles by PTR-MS", 1st International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications. Innsbruck, Austria: Universitaet Innsbruck, pp. 153–6, 2003.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_1.pdf
[Hawes2003] Hawes, A. K., S. Solomon, R. W. Portmann, J. S. Daniel, A. O. Langford, LR. H Miller, C. S. Eubank, P. Goldan, C. Wiedinmyer, E. Atlas, et al., "Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization", Journal of Environmental Monitoring, vol. 5, no. 6: Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 977–983, 2003.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2003/em/b308911h
Abstract
Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.
[Yeretzian2003] Yeretzian, C., A. Jordan, and W. Lindinger, "Analysing the headspace of coffee by proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 223: Elsevier, pp. 115–139, 2003.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380602007856
Abstract
An extensive analysis of the headspace (HS) of coffee brew using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) is presented. In particular, we present a set of methods that link mass spectral peaks, as observed in PTR-MS, to chemical compounds in the HS of coffee. Combining all this information, a tentative assignment and rough quantification of liquid coffee HS is presented. Coffee was chosen because it contains a large number of chemically diverse volatile organic compounds (VOCs), representing a challenging system for on-line analysis by PTR-MS.
2004
[Biasioli2004a] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, G. Odorizzi, E. Aprea, and D. Mott, "Applicabilità del PTR-MS al controllo degli odori negli impianti per il trattamento dei rifiuti", Rifiuti solidi, 2004.
Link: http://openpub.iasma.it/handle/10449/18438
[Ammann2004] Ammann, C., C. Spirig, A. Neftel, M. Steinbacher, M. Komenda, and A. Schaub, "Application of PTR-MS for measurements of biogenic VOC in a deciduous forest", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 87–101, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003884
Abstract
The vegetation–atmosphere-exchange is an important process controlling the atmospheric concentration of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that play a major role in atmospheric chemistry. However, the quantification of VOC exchange on the ecosystem scale is still an analytical challenge. In the present study we tested and applied a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry system (PTR-MS) for the measurement of biogenic VOCs in a mixed deciduous forest. VOC concentrations were calculated from the raw instrument signals based on physical principles. This method allows a consistent quantification also of compounds for which regular calibration with a gas standard is not available. It requires a regular and careful investigation of the mass-dependent ion detection characteristics of the PTR-MS, which otherwise could become a considerable error source. The PTR-MS method was tested in the laboratory for a range of oxygenated and non-oxygenated VOCs using a permeation source. The agreement was within 16% or better, which is well within the expected uncertainty. During the field measurement campaign in a deciduous forest stand, an on-line intercomparison with a state-of-the-art gas-chromatography system showed a generally good agreement. However, the relatively low ambient VOC concentrations revealed some systematic difference for acetone and isoprene, that may indicate an error in the determination of the PTR-MS offset or an interference of an unidentified isobaric compound on the detected ion mass. With the presentation of selected field results, we demonstrate the ability of the PTR-MS system to measure continuous vertical concentration profiles of biogenic VOCs throughout a forest canopy at a time resolution of 20 min. The resulting datasets provide valuable information for the study of the interactions between emission, photochemical transformation and transport processes within and above the forest canopy.
[Amann2004] Amann, A., G. Poupart, S. Telser, M. Ledochowski, A. Schmid, and S. Mechtcheriakov, "Applications of breath gas analysis in medicine", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2-3, pp. 227 - 233, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003574
Abstract
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath gas provide valuable information about the subjects' physiological and pathophysiological condition. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) allows rapid and online measurements of these substances. We present results of three studies illustrating the potential of breath gas analysis by PTR-MS in various contexts: long-time online monitoring of VOCs in sleeping subjects suggests that VOC profiles are related to sleep stages. Analysis of VOC concentrations in the breath of carbohydrate malabsorbers emphasizes the role played by bacteria in the gut. Finally, we demonstrate the large intra- and intersubject concentration variability of VOCs by considering one particular mass.
2005
[Aprea2005] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, G. Sani, C. Cantini, and T. D. Maerk, "Advanced oxidation in olive oil: monitoring of secondary reaction products and detection of rancid defect", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, vol. -, pp. 144, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=155
[Graus2005] Graus, M., JP. Schnitzler, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Alternative Carbon Sources for Leaf Isoprene Formation", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 19, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=30
[Mestres2005] Mestres, M., N. Moran, A. Jordan, and A. Buettner, "Aroma release and retronasal perception during and after consumption of flavored whey protein gels with different textures. 1. in vivo release analysis.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 53, no. 2: Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelchemie, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching, Germany., pp. 403–409, Jan, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf048596n
Abstract
The influence of gel texture on retronasal aroma release during mastication was followed by means of real-time proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and compared to sensory perception of overall aroma intensity. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo. A modified data analysis approach was used to monitor the aroma changes during the mastication process. It was found that the temporal resolution of the release profile played an important role in adequate description of the release processes. On the basis of this observation, a hypothesis is presented for the observed differences in intensity rating.
[DAnna2005] D'Anna, B., A. Wisthaler, Øyvind. Andreasen, A. Hansel, J. Hjorth, N. R. Jensen, C. J. Nielsen, Y. Stenstrøm, and J. Viidanoja, "Atmospheric chemistry of C3-C6 cycloalkanecarbaldehydes.", J Phys Chem A, vol. 109, no. 23: Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo, Norway. barbara.danna@kjemi.uio.no, pp. 5104–5118, Jun, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp044495g
Abstract
The rate coefficients for the gas phase reaction of NO3 and OH radicals with a series of cycloalkanecarbaldehydes have been measured in purified air at 298 +/- 2 K and 760 +/- 10 Torr by the relative rate method using a static reactor equipped with long-path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection. The values obtained for the OH radical reactions (in units of 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 2.13 +/- 0.05; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 2.66 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 3.27 +/- 0.07; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.75 +/- 0.05. The values obtained for the NO3 radical reactions (in units of 10(-14) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 0.61 +/- 0.04; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 1.99 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 2.55 +/- 0.10; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.19 +/- 0.12. Furthermore, the reaction products with OH radicals have been investigated using long-path FT-IR spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The measured carbon balances were in the range 89-97%, and the identified products cover a wide spectrum of compounds including nitroperoxycarbonyl cycloalkanes, cycloketones, cycloalkyl nitrates, multifunctional compounds containing carbonyl, hydroxy, and nitrooxy functional groups, HCOOH, HCHO, CO, and CO2.
2006
[Colomb2006] Colomb, A., J. Williams, J. Crowley, V. Gros, R. Hofmann, G. Salisbury, T. Klüpfel, R. Kormann, A. Stickler, C. Forster, et al., "Airborne measurements of trace organic species in the upper troposphere over Europe: the impact of deep convection", Environmental Chemistry, vol. 3, no. 4: CSIRO, pp. 244–259, 2006.
Link: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EN06020
Abstract
The volume mixing ratios of several organic trace gases and ozone (O3) were measured in the upper troposphere over Europe during the UTOPIHAN-ACT aircraft campaign in July 2003. The organic trace gases included alkanes, isoprene, aromatics, iodomethane, and trichloroethylene, oxygenates such as acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and longer-lived tracer species such as chlorofluorocarbons and halochloroflurocarbons. The aim of the UTOPIHAN-ACT project was to study the chemical impact of deep convection on the continental upper troposphere. A Lear Jet aircraft, based in Germany, was flown at heights between 6 and 13 km in the region 59°N–42°N to 7°W–13°E during July 2003. Overall, the convectively influenced measurements presented here show a weaker variability lifetime dependence of trace gases than similar measurements collected over the Mediterranean region under more stable high-pressure conditions. Several cases of convective outflow are identified by the elevated mixing ratios of organic species relative to quiescent background conditions, with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences detectable in the upper troposphere. Enhancement at higher altitudes, notably of species with relatively short chemical lifetimes such as benzene, toluene, and even isoprene indicates deep convection over short timescales during summertime. The impact of deep convection on the local upper tropospheric formaldehyde and HOx budgets is assessed.
2007
[Sinha2007] Sinha, V., J. Williams, M. Meyerhöfer, U. Riebesell, AI. Paulino, and A. Larsen, "Air-sea fluxes of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and DMS from a Norwegian fjord following a phytoplankton bloom in a mesocosm experiment", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 7, no. 3: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 739–755, 2007.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/739/2007/acp-7-739-2007.html
Abstract
{The ocean's influence on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is poorly understood. This work characterises the oceanic emission and/or uptake of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) as a function of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and a suite of biological parameters. The measurements were taken following a phytoplankton bloom, in May/June 2005 with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), from mesocosm enclosures anchored in the Raunefjord, Southern Norway. The net flux of methanol was always into the ocean, and was stronger at night. Isoprene and acetaldehyde were emitted from the ocean, correlating with light (ravcorr
[Aprea2007a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, D. Mott, F. Marini, and T. D. Maerk, "Assessment of Trentingrana cheese ageing by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and chemometrics", International dairy journal, vol. 17, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 226–234, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0958694606000501
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) data have been analysed by chemometric techniques to monitor cheese ageing by means of on-line direct head-space gas analysis. Twenty cheese loaves of Trentingrana, a trademarked cheese produced in northern Italy, of different origin and ripening degree, were sampled over the whole Trentingrana production area. An increase of the spectral intensity with ripening has been observed for most of the PTR-MS peaks and a univariate analysis identified 16 mass peaks that were significantly different for ripened and young cheeses, respectively. Moreover, the usefulness of different discriminant analyses and class modelling techniques have been investigated. Discriminant Partial Least Squares analysis, while indicating average behaviour and possible outliers, was not able to correctly classify all samples. Soft class modelling performed better and allowed a 100% correct classification. Partial least square calibration predicted the ageing time of each loaf with reasonable accuracy with a maximum cross-validation error of 3.5 months.
2008
[Ngwabie2008] Ngwabie, N. Martin, G. W. Schade, T. G. Custer, S. Linke, and T. Hinz, "Abundances and flux estimates of volatile organic compounds from a dairy cowshed in Germany", Journal of environmental quality, vol. 37, no. 2: American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society, pp. 565–573, 2008.
Link: https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/jeq/abstracts/37/2/565
Abstract
Animal husbandry and manure treatment have been specifically documented as significant sources of methane, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and particulate matter. Although volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are also produced, much less information exists concerning their impact. We report on chemical ionization mass spectrometry and photo-acoustic spectroscopy measurements of mixing ratios of VOCs over a 2-wk measurement period in a large cowshed at the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Mariensee, Germany. The high time resolution of these measurements enables insight into the sources of the emissions in a typical livestock management setting. During feeding hours and solid manure removal, large mixing ratio spikes of several VOCs were observed and correlated with simultaneous methane, carbon dioxide, and ammonia level enhancements. The subsequent decay of cowshed concentration due to passive cowshed ventilation was used to model emission rates, which were dominated by ethanol and acetic acid, followed by methanol. Correlations of VOC mixing ratios with methane or ammonia were also used to calculate cowshed emission factors and to estimate potential nationwide VOC emissions from dairy cows. The results ranged from around 0.1 Gg carbon per year (1 Gg = 109 g) for nonanal and dimethylsulfide, several Gg carbon per year for volatile fatty acids and methanol, to over 10 Gg carbon per year of emitted ethanol. While some estimates were not consistent between the two extrapolation methods, the results indicate that animal husbandry VOC emissions are dominated by oxygenated compounds and may be a nationally but not globally significant emission to the atmosphere.
2009
[1583] Knighton, W.. B., E.. C. Fortner, S.. C. Herndon, E.. C. Wood, and R.. C. Miake-Lye, "Adaptation of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer instrument to employ NO+ as reagent ion for the detection of 1,3-butadiene in the ambient atmosphere.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 23, pp. 3301–3308, Oct, 2009.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.4249
Abstract
<p>A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) instrument was adapted to employ NO+ as a chemical reagent ion without any hardware changes by switching the reagent ion source gas from water vapor to dry air. Ionization of dry air within the hollow cathode ion source generates a very intense source of NO+ with only a minor impurity of NO2+. The intensities of the primary NO+ reagent ion and the unwanted impurity NO2+ are controllable and dependent on the operational conditions of the hollow cathode ion source. Ion source tuning parameters are described, which maintain an intense source of NO+ while keeping the impurity NO2+ signal to less than 2% of the total reagent ion intensity. This method is applied to the detection of 1,3-butadiene. NO+ reacts efficiently with 1,3-butadiene via a charge exchange reaction to produce only the molecular ion, which is detected at m/z 54. Detection sensitivities of the order of 45 pptv for a 1-s measurement of 1,3-butadiene are demonstrated. We present the first real-time on-line sub parts per billion measurement of 1,3-butadiene in the ambient atmosphere. The only likely interference is from 1,2-butadiene. Concurrent measurements of benzene are provided and suggest that the vehicular emissions are the predominant source of 1,3-butadiene in a suburban Boston area monitoring location.</p>

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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