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[1470] Biasioli, F., "10 years PTR-MS at FEM: from sensory analysis to omics", CONFERENCE SERIES, 1, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
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[Aprea2005] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, G. Sani, C. Cantini, and T. D. Maerk, "Advanced oxidation in olive oil: monitoring of secondary reaction products and detection of rancid defect", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, vol. -, pp. 144, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=155
[Aprea2012] Aprea, E., F. Morisco, F. Biasioli, P. Vitaglione, L. Cappellin, C. Soukoulis, V. Lembo, F. Gasperi, G. D'Argenio, V. Fogliano, et al., "Analysis of breath by proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry in rats with steatohepatitis induced by high-fat diet.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 47, no. 9: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Department, Via E. Mach, 1, 38010, S. Michele a/A, Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 1098–1103, Sep, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3009
Abstract
Breath testing has been largely used as a diagnostic tool, but the difficulties in data interpretation and sample collection have limited its application. We developed a fast (< 20?s), on-line, non-invasive method for the collection and analysis of exhaled breath in awake rats based on proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and applied it to investigate possible relationships between pathologies induced by dietary regime and breath composition. As a case study, we investigated rats with dietary induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and modifications induced by coffee addition to the diet. We considered two different diets (standard and high fat) complemented with two different drinking possibilities (water or decaffeinated coffee) for a total of four groups with four rats each. Several spectrometric peaks were reliable markers for both dietary fat content and coffee supplementation. The high resolution and accuracy of PTR-ToF-MS allowed the identification of related compounds such as methanol, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl sulphone and ammonia. In conclusion, the rapid and minimally invasive breath analysis of awake rats permitted the identification of markers related to diet and specific pathologic conditions and provided a useful tool for broader metabolic investigations.
[Biasioli2004a] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, G. Odorizzi, E. Aprea, and D. Mott, "Applicabilità del PTR-MS al controllo degli odori negli impianti per il trattamento dei rifiuti", Rifiuti solidi, 2004.
Link: http://openpub.iasma.it/handle/10449/18438
[1548] Aprea, E., L. Cappellin, F. Gasperi, F. Morisco, V. Lembo, A. Rispo, R. Tortora, P. Vitaglione, N. Caporaso, and F. Biasioli, "Application of PTR-TOF-{MS} to investigate metabolites in exhaled breath of patients affected by coeliac disease under gluten free diet", Journal of Chromatography B, vol. 966, pp. 208–213, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2014.02.015
Abstract
<p>Coeliac disease (CD) is a common chronic inflammatory disorder of the small bowel induced in genetically susceptible people by the exposure to gliadin gluten. Even though several tests are available to assist the diagnosis, CD remains a biopsy-defined disorder, thus any non-invasive or less invasive diagnostic tool may be beneficial. The analysis of volatile metabolites in exhaled breath, given its non-invasive nature, is particularly promising as a screening tool of disease in symptomatic or non-symptomatic patients. In this preliminary study the proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry coupled to a buffered end-tidal on-line sampler to investigate metabolites in the exhaled breath of patients affected by coeliac disease under a gluten free diet was applied. Both H3O+ or NO+ were used as precursor ions. In our investigation no differences were found in the exhaled breath of CD patients compared to healthy controls. In this study, 33 subjects were enrolled: 16 patients with CD, all adhering a gluten free diet, and 17 healthy controls. CD patients did not show any symptom of the disease at the time of breath analysis; thus the absence of discrimination from healthy controls was not surprising.</p>
[Aprea2007a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, D. Mott, F. Marini, and T. D. Maerk, "Assessment of Trentingrana cheese ageing by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and chemometrics", International dairy journal, vol. 17, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 226–234, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0958694606000501
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) data have been analysed by chemometric techniques to monitor cheese ageing by means of on-line direct head-space gas analysis. Twenty cheese loaves of Trentingrana, a trademarked cheese produced in northern Italy, of different origin and ripening degree, were sampled over the whole Trentingrana production area. An increase of the spectral intensity with ripening has been observed for most of the PTR-MS peaks and a univariate analysis identified 16 mass peaks that were significantly different for ripened and young cheeses, respectively. Moreover, the usefulness of different discriminant analyses and class modelling techniques have been investigated. Discriminant Partial Least Squares analysis, while indicating average behaviour and possible outliers, was not able to correctly classify all samples. Soft class modelling performed better and allowed a 100% correct classification. Partial least square calibration predicted the ageing time of each loaf with reasonable accuracy with a maximum cross-validation error of 3.5 months.
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[Biasioli2004b] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, D. Mott, E. Aprea, F. Marini, and TD. Maerk, "Characterization of Strawberry Genotypes by PTR-MS Spectral Fingerprinting: a Three Year Study", V International Strawberry Symposium 708, pp. 497–500, 2004.
Link: http://www.actahort.org/books/708/708_87.htm
Abstract
Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) fingerprinting has been used to accurately and rapidly identify the cultivar of single intact strawberry fruits. The technique has been applied in a 3-cultivar experiment with 70 fruits harvested in 2002, 2003 and 2004. The proposed models correctly predicted the cultivar. Cross-validation tests verified 100% correct classification. The data indicated the possibility of correctly characterizing single fruit by fast non-invasive measurements without any pre-treatment and/or concentration of the headspace gas mixture. This is a necessary preliminary step in view of correlation studies of PTR-MS data with genetics and other characterization of fruits, in particular, sensory analysis. Extension to more cultivars is envisaged.
[1716] Schuhfried, E., J. {Sánchez Del Pulgar}, M. Bobba, R. Piro, L. Cappellin, T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Classification of 7 monofloral honey varieties by PTR-ToF-MS direct headspace analysis and chemometrics.", Talanta, vol. 147, pp. 213–219, Jan, 2016.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2015.09.062
Abstract
<p>Honey, in particular monofloral varieties, is a valuable commodity. Here, we present proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry, PTR-ToF-MS, coupled to chemometrics as a successful tool in the classification of monofloral honeys, which should serve in fraud protection against mispresentation of the floral origin of honey. We analyzed 7 different honey varieties from citrus, chestnut, sunflower, honeydew, robinia, rhododendron and linden tree, in total 70 different honey samples and a total of 206 measurements. Only subtle differences in the profiles of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of the different honeys could be found. Nevertheless, it was possible to successfully apply 6 different classification methods with a total correct assignment of 81-99% in the internal validation sets. The most successful methods were stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and probabilistic neural network (PNN), giving total correct assignments in the external validation sets of 100 and 90%, respectively. Clearly, PTR-ToF-MS/chemometrics is a powerful tool in honey classification.</p>
[Biasioli2006] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, I. Endrizzi, V. Framondino, F. Marini, D. Mott, and T. D. Maerk, "Correlation of PTR-MS spectral fingerprints with sensory characterisation of flavour and odour profile of "Trentingrana" cheese", Food quality and preference, vol. 17, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 63–75, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095032930500090X
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate detection of volatile organic compounds. The paper discusses the possibility of correlating the PTR-MS spectral fingerprint of the mixture of volatile compounds present in the head-space of 20 samples of “Trentingrana”, the variety of Grana Padano produced in Trentino (Northern Italy), with the sensory evaluation (Quantitative Descriptive Analysis) of the same samples obtained by a panel of trained judges. Only attributes related to odours (six attributes) and flavours (six attributes) are considered. Results of descriptive statistics are shown and the performances of different multivariate calibration methods (Partial Least Squares, both PLS1 and PLS2) are compared by evaluating the errors in the cross-validated estimation of the sensory attributes. PLS2 seems to give a good average description providing an overall insight of the problem but does not provide an accurate prediction of the individual sensory attributes. PLS1 analysis is more accurate and performs well in most cases but it uses several latent variables, so that the interpretation of the loadings is not straightforward. The preliminary application of Orthogonal Signal Correction filtering on PTR-MS spectra followed by PLS1 analysis results in a good estimation for most of the attributes and has the advantage to use only one or two latent variables. Comparison with other works and a tentative indication of the compounds correlated with sensory description are reported.
[Biasioli2003] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, D. Mott, E. Boscaini, D. Mayr, and T. D. Maerk, "Coupling proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry with linear discriminant analysis: a case study.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 51, no. 25: Istituto Agrario di S. Michele a/A, S. Michele, Via E. Mach 2, 38010, Italy. franco.biasioli@ismaa.it, pp. 7227–7233, Dec, 2003.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf030248i
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) measurements on single intact strawberry fruits were combined with an appropriate data analysis based on compression of spectrometric data followed by class modeling. In a first experiment 8 of 9 different strawberry varieties measured on the third to fourth day after harvest could be successfully distinguished by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on PTR-MS spectra compressed by discriminant partial least squares (dPLS). In a second experiment two varieties were investigated as to whether different growing conditions (open field, tunnel), location, and/or harvesting time can affect the proposed classification method. Internal cross-validation gives 27 successes of 28 tests for the 9 varieties experiment and 100% for the 2 clones experiment (30 samples). For one clone, present in both experiments, the models developed for one experiment were successfully tested with the homogeneous independent data of the other with success rates of 100% (3 of 3) and 93% (14 of 15), respectively. This is an indication that the proposed combination of PTR-MS with discriminant analysis and class modeling provides a new and valuable tool for product classification in agroindustrial applications.
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[Cappellin2011a] Cappellin, L., F. Biasioli, P. M. Granitto, E. Schuhfried, C. Soukoulis, F. Costa, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "On data analysis in PTR-TOF-MS: From raw spectra to data mining", Sensors and actuators B: Chemical, vol. 155, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 183–190, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925400510009135
Abstract
Recently the coupling of proton transfer reaction ionization with a time-of-flight mass analyser (PTR-TOF-MS) has been proposed to realise a volatile organic compound (VOC) detector that overcomes the limitations in terms of time and mass resolution of the previous instrument based on a quadrupole mass analysers (PTR-Quad-MS). This opens new horizons for research and allows for new applications in fields where the rapid and sensitive monitoring and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is crucial as, for instance, environmental sciences, food sciences and medicine. In particular, if coupled with appropriate data mining methods, it can provide a fast MS-nose system with rich analytical information. The main, perhaps even the only, drawback of this new technique in comparison to its precursor is related to the increased size and complexity of the data sets obtained. It appears that this is the main limitation to its full use and widespread application. Here we present and discuss a complete computer-based strategy for the data analysis of PTR-TOF-MS data from basic mass spectra handling, to the application of up-to date data mining methods. As a case study we apply the whole procedure to the classification of apple cultivars and clones, which was based on the distinctive profiles of volatile organic compound emissions.
[Schuhfried2012] Schuhfried, E., E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, C. Soukoulis, R. Viola, T. D. Maerk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Desorption kinetics with PTR-MS: Isothermal differential desorption kinetics from a heterogeneous inlet surface at ambient pressure and a new concept for compound identification", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. -: Elsevier, pp. -, 2012.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380612000292
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a soft ionization mass spectrometric technique for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a very low limit of detection (LOD) (parts per trillion by volume) and excellent time resolution (split seconds). This makes PTR-MS a particularly interesting instrument for investigating surface desorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under realistic conditions, i.e., at ambient pressure from a heterogeneous surface. Here, we report on the investigation of heterogeneous inlet surface kinetics with PTR-MS and based thereon, develop concepts to assist compound identification in PTR-MS. First, we studied differential isothermal desorption kinetics using heterogeneous inlet surface data measured by Mikoviny et al. [7] with their newly developed high-temp-PTR-MS. The best fit to their data is obtained with bimodal pseudo-first order kinetics. In addition, we explored the normalization of the data and calculated data points of the desorption isotherms. We found evidence that the interesting part of the isotherm can be linearized in a double log plot. Then we investigated the idea to use memory effects of the inlet system to assist compound identification. At the moment, the main problem is the dependence of the kinetics on the initial equilibrium gas phase adsorption concentration, and thus, the surface coverage. As a solution, we suggest an empirical, quasi-concentration independent, yet compound specific parameter: the normalized desorption time tnd describing the decline of the signal to 1/e2 of the initial concentration, normalized to an initial concentration of 10,000 counts per second (cps). Furthermore, we investigated property–property and structure–property relationships of this new parameter. Further possible improvements are discussed as well.
[Oezdestan2013] Özdestan, Ö., S. M. van Ruth, M. Alewijn, A. Koot, A. Romano, L. Cappellin, and F. Biasioli, "Differentiation of specialty coffees by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry", Food Research International: Elsevier, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996913003025
Abstract
In the coffee sector a diversity of certifications is available, with the most well-known being organic and fair trade. Intrinsic markers of products may help to assure the authenticity of food products and complement administrative controls. In the present study 110 market coffees with special production traits were characterized by high sensitivity proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (HS PTR-MS) and volatiles were tentatively identified by PTR-time of flight MS. Espresso coffees, Kopi Luwak coffee and organic coffees could be distinguished by their profiles of volatile compounds with the help of chemometrics. A PLS-DA classification model was estimated to classify the organic and regular coffees by their HS PTR-MS mass spectra. Cross validation showed correct prediction of 42 out of the 43 (98%) organic coffee samples and 63 out of the 67 (95%) regular coffee samples. Therefore, the presented strategy is a promising approach to rapid organic coffee authentication.
[Biasioli2011] Biasioli, F., C. Yeretzian, T. D. Märk, J. Dewulf, and H. Van Langenhove, "Direct-injection mass spectrometry adds the time dimension to (B) VOC analysis", TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry, vol. 30, no. 7: Elsevier, pp. 1003–1017, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165993611001269
Abstract
In the past decade, we have witnessed rapid development of direct-injection mass spectrometric (DIMS) technologies that combine ever-improving mass and time resolution with high sensitivity and robustness. Here, we review some of the most significant DIMS technologies, which have been applied to rapid monitoring and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and biogenic VOCS (BVOCs). They include MS-e-noses, atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), and selected ion-flow-tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). DIMS-based MS-e-noses provide the possibility to screen large sample sets and may yield rich analytical information. APCI is a widespread ionization method and pioneered DIMS in environmental and flavor-release applications. SIFT-MS and PTR-MS allow better control of precursor-ion generation and hence of the ionization process. SIFT-MS puts the focus on control of the ionization process, while PTR-MS does so on sensitivity. Most (B)VOCs of interest can be efficiently detected and often identified by DIMS, thanks also to the possibility of switching between different precursor ions and the recent realization of time-of-flight-based equipments. Finally, we give selected examples of applications for each of the key technologies, including research in food-quality control (MS-e-nose), flavor release (APCI), environmental sciences (PTR-MS) and health sciences (SIFT-MS).
[LaPorta2004] La Porta, N., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, and T. D. Märk, "Discrimination of Heterobasidion annosum ISGs by evaluation of volatile organic compounds", S. Michele all'Adige, Italy, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 379–382, 2004.
Link: http://core.kmi.open.ac.uk/download/pdf/2835560#page=418
Abstract
Heterobasidion annosum represents one of the most dangerous fungi in the conifer forest of the boreal hemisphere. This fungus was differentiated into three biological species (Intersterile groups; ISGs) characterized by different host specificity, patogenicity and distribution. A fast and easy identification of the ISG has important consequences on the silvicultural decition making. However, the determination of the ISG from the morphological traits of fruit bodies or, least of all, from mycelium is usually not easy. Proton Transfer Reaction – Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a new technique proposed and realised by the University of Innsbruck, and now issued also to the market. This technique allows high performance on-line measurements for a large number of VOCs. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility to discriminate the H. annosum ISGs based on their volatile compound emission and to identify putative characteristic masses that may play an important role in the host specificity and in the specific antagonistic fungi among each ISGs. Twelve strains belong to the three ISGs (here idicated by F, P and S) were analysed by PTRMS fingerprinting. P ISG was definitely separated from F and S ISGs. In addition, several masses show to be significantly different among the three ISGs. ANOVA on PTR-MS peak values identified 16 significant masses out of 230. Applications and limitations of this approach are discussed.
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[Gasperi2009] Gasperi, F., E. Aprea, F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, I. Endrizzi, G. Pirretti, and S. Spilimbergo, "Effects of supercritical CO< sub> 2 and N< sub> 2 O pasteurisation on the quality of fresh apple juice", Food chemistry, vol. 115, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 129–136, 2009.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814608014234
Abstract
Supercritical pasteurisation is receiving increasing attention as an alternative technology for foodstuff pasteurisation, but often the possible effects on the perceptible quality are not sufficiently considered. To address this latter issue, besides standard microbial analysis, we here investigate the impact of CO2/N2O supercritical pasteurisation (100 bar, 36 °C and 10 min treatment time) on the quality traits of fresh apple juice, linked to consumer perception. Discriminative sensory analysis (triangle test) and basic chemical characterization (total solids, sugars, organic acids, polyphenols) could not clearly demonstrate any induced modification of the treated juice, while head space analysis of volatile compounds (both by GC–MS and PTR–MS) indicated a general depletion of the volatile compounds that must be considered in the development of a stabilization method based on supercritical gases.
[Cappellin2011] Cappellin, L., F. Biasioli, E. Schuhfried, C. Soukoulis, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Extending the dynamic range of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometers by a novel dead time correction.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 25, no. 1: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Area, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele a/A, Italy., pp. 179–183, Jan, 2011.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rcm.4819/abstract
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) allows for very fast simultaneous monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in complex environments. In several applications, food science and food technology in particular, peaks with very different intensities are present in a single spectrum. For VOCs, the concentrations range from the sub-ppt all the way up to the ppm level. Thus, a large dynamic range is necessary. In particular, high intensity peaks are a problem because for them the linear dependency of the detector signal on VOC concentration is distorted. In this paper we present, test with real data, and discuss a novel method which extends the linearity of PTR-TOF-MS for high intensity peaks far beyond the limit allowed by the usual analytical correction methods such as the so-called Poisson correction. Usually, raw data can be used directly without corrections with an intensity of up to about 0.1 ions/pulse, and the Poisson correction allows the use of peaks with intensities of a few ions/pulse. Our method further extends the linear range by at least one order of magnitude. Although this work originated from the necessity to extend the dynamic range of PTR-TOF-MS instruments in agro-industrial applications, it is by no means limited to this area, and can be implemented wherever dead time corrections are an issue.
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[Tasin2012] Tasin, M., L. Cappellin, and F. Biasioli, "Fast direct injection mass-spectrometric characterization of stimuli for insect electrophysiology by proton transfer reaction-time of flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS).", Sensors (Basel), vol. 12, no. 4: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy. marco.tasin@slu.se, pp. 4091–4104, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s120404091
Abstract
Electrophysiological techniques are used in insect neuroscience to measure the response of olfactory neurons to volatile odour stimuli. Widely used systems to deliver an olfactory stimulus to a test insect include airstream guided flow through glass cartridges loaded with a given volatile compound on a sorbent support. Precise measurement of the quantity of compound reaching the sensory organ of the test organism is an urgent task in insect electrophysiology. In this study we evaluated the performances of the recent realised proton transfer reaction-time of flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) as a fast and selective gas sensor. In particular, we characterised the gas emission from cartridges loaded with a set of volatile compounds belonging to different chemical classes and commonly used in electrophysiological experiments. PTR-ToF-MS allowed a fast monitoring of all investigated compounds with sufficient sensitivity and time resolution. The detection and the quantification of air contaminants and solvent or synthetic standards impurities allowed a precise quantification of the stimulus exiting the cartridge. The outcome of this study was twofold: on one hand we showed that PTR-ToF-MS allows monitoring fast processes with high sensitivity by real time detection of a broad number of compounds; on the other hand we provided a tool to solve an important issue in insect electrophysiology.
[Biasioli2003a] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, L. Colato, E. Boscaini, and TD. Maerk, "Fingerprinting mass spectrometry by PTR-MS: heat treatment vs. pressure treatment of red orange juice - a case study", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 223: Elsevier, pp. 343–353, 2003.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380602008709
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is more and more applied to rather different fields of research and applications showing interesting performances where high sensitivity and fast monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are required. Based on this technique and aiming at the realisation of an automatic system for routine applications in food science and technology, we tested here a novel approach for fingerprinting mass spectrometric detection and analysis of complex mixtures of VOCs. In particular, we describe and discuss corresponding head space (HS) sampling methods and possible data analysis techniques. As a first test case we studied here the properties of four red orange juices processed by different stabilisation methods starting from the same industrial batch: untreated juice, thermal pasteurised (flash and standard) juice and high pressure stabilised juice. We demonstrate the possibility of a fast automatic discrimination/classification of the samples with the further advantage, compared to the use of electronic noses, of useful information on the mass of the discriminating compounds. Moreover, first comparisons with discriminative analysis by a sensory panel shows evidence that there is a correlation between the ability of the PTR-MS to distinguish different juice samples and that of a panel of trained judges with the obvious advantages of an instrumental approach.
[1591] Maihom, T., E. Schuhfried, M. Probst, J. Limtrakul, T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Fragmentation of allylmethylsulfide by chemical ionization: dependence on humidity and inhibiting role of water.", J Phys Chem A, vol. 117, pp. 5149–5160, Jun, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp4015806
Abstract
<p>We report on a previously unknown reaction mechanism involving water in the fragmentation reaction following chemical ionization. This result stems from a study presented here on the humidity-dependent and energy-dependent endoergic fragmentation of allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) upon protonation in a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). The fragmentation pathways were studied with experimental (PTR-MS) and quantum chemical methods (polarizable continuum model (PCM), microhydration, studied at the MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory). We report in detail on the energy profiles, reaction mechanisms, and proton affinities (G4MP2 calculations). In the discovered reaction mechanism, water reduces the fragmentation of protonated species in chemical ionization. It does so by direct interaction with the protonated species via covalent binding (C3H5(+)) or via association (AMS&middot;H(+)). This stabilizes intermediate complexes and thus overall increases the activation energy for fragmentation. Water thereby acts as a reusable inhibitor (anticatalyst) in chemical ionization. Moreover, according to the quantum chemical (QC) results, when water is present in abundance it has the opposite effect and enhances fragmentation. The underlying reason is a concentration-dependent change in the reaction principle from active inhibition of fragmentation to solvation, which then enhances fragmentation. This amphoteric behavior of water is found for the fragmentation of C3H5(+) to C3H3(+), and similarly for the fragmentation of AMS&middot;H(+) to C3H5(+). The results support humidity-dependent quantification efforts for PTR-MS and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Moreover, the results should allow for a better understanding of ion-chemistry in the presence of water.</p>
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[Boscaini2003] Boscaini, E., S. { van Ruth}, F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, and T. D. Maerk, "Gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) analysis of the flavor profile of grana padano, parmigiano reggiano, and grana trentino cheeses.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 51, no. 7: Institut fuer Ionenphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 1782–1790, Mar, 2003.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf020922g
Abstract
Gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques were used to deduce the profile of odor-active and volatile compounds of three grana cheeses: Grana Padano (GP), Parmigiano Reggiano (PR), and Grana Trentino (GT). Samples for GC-O analysis were prepared by dynamic headspace extraction, while a direct analysis of the headspace formed over cheese was performed by PTR-MS. The major contributors to the odor profile were ethyl butanoate, 2-heptanone, and ethyl hexanoate, with fruity notes. A high concentration of mass 45, tentatively identified as acetaldehyde, was found by PTR-MS analysis. Low odor threshold compounds, e.g., methional and 1-octen-3-one, which contributed to the odor profile but were not detected by FID, were detected by PTR-MS. Principal component analysis on both GC-O and PTR-MS data separated the three cheese samples well and showed specific compounds related to each sample.
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[Romano2013] Romano, A., L. Cappellin, V. Ting, E. Aprea, L. Navarini, M. Barnabà, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Hyphenation of PTR-ToF-MS and newly developed software provides a new effective tool for the study of inter-individual differences among tasters", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 59, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
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[1710] Gamero-Negrón, R., J. {Sánchez Del Pulgar}, L. Cappellin, C. García, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Immune-spaying as an alternative to surgical spaying in Iberian × Duroc females: Effect on the VOC profile of dry-cured shoulders and dry-cured loins as detected by PTR-ToF-MS.", Meat Sci, vol. 110, pp. 169–173, Dec, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meatsci.2015.07.018
Abstract
<p>Immunocastration in pigs has been proposed as a cruelty-free alternative to surgical castration. In this work the effect of immune-spaying of female pigs on the volatile compound profile of Iberian dry-cured products was evaluated. The head-space volatile compound of dry-cured shoulders and loins from surgically spayed, immune-spayed and entire Iberian &times; Duroc females was characterized by proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry. It was not possible to identify a significant effect of the castration modality on dry-cured shoulders, probably because of the heterogeneity of samples. Contrarily, Principal Component Analysis of dry-cured loins indicates a better homogeneity of samples and the separation of loins from surgically spayed and immune-spayed females. Some mass peaks tentatively identified as important flavor compounds in dry-cured products, 3-methylbutanal, 2,3-butanedione and 3-methylbutanoic acid, were significantly higher in the immune-spayed females. Therefore, immune-spaying seems to have a negligible effect on the volatile compound profile of dry-cured shoulders, whereas it could affect the VOC profile in the case of dry-cured loins.</p>
[Cappellin2010a] Cappellin, L., F. Biasioli, A. Fabris, E. Schuhfried, C. Soukoulis, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Improved mass accuracy in PTR-TOF-MS: Another step towards better compound identification in PTR-MS", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 290, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 60–63, 2010.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380609003571
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) provides on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a low detection threshold and a fast response time. Commercially available set-ups are usually based on quadrupole analysers that, due to the unit mass resolution, do not provide useful analytical information besides the nominal mass of the ions detected. Recently new instruments based on time-of-flight (PTR-TOF-MS) analysers have been proposed and commercialized. They provide higher mass resolution and thus improve the analytical information contained in the spectra. Mass accuracy, however, is an issue that has not been considered in great detail in the published papers on PTR-TOF-MS so far. We show here that the mass accuracy obtained by a commercial apparatus can be improved by proper data analysis. In particular, internal calibration based on an improved algorithm allows for a mass accuracy that suffices for elemental determination in the most common situations. Achieving good mass accuracy is a fundamental step for further exploiting the analytical potential of PTR-MS.
[JLTing2012] Ting, V. J. L., C. Soukoulis, P. Silcock, L. Cappellin, A. Romano, E. Aprea, P. J. Bremer, T. D. Märk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "In Vitro and In Vivo Flavor Release from Intact and Fresh-Cut Apple in Relation with Genetic, Textural, and Physicochemical Parameters", Journal of food science, vol. 77, no. 11: Wiley Online Library, pp. C1226–C1233, 2012.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02947.x/full
Abstract
Flavor release from 6 commercial apple cultivars (Fuji, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Morgen Dallago, and Red Delicious) under static conditions (intact or fresh-cut samples) and during consumption of fresh-cut samples (nosespace) was determined by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Textural (firmness, fracturability, flesh elasticity, and rupture) and physicochemical (pH, acidity, and water content) properties of the apples were also measured. Static headspace analysis of intact fruits revealed Fuji and Granny Smith apples had the lowest concentration for all measured flavor compounds (esters, aldehydes, alcohols, and terpenes), whereas Red Delicious apples had the highest. Fresh-cut samples generally showed a significant increase in total volatile compounds with acetaldehyde being most abundant. However, compared to intact fruits, cut Golden and Red Delicious apples had a lower intensity for ester related peaks. Five parameters were extracted from the nosespace data of peaks related to esters (m/z 43, 61), acetaldehyde (m/z 45), and ethanol (m/z 47): 2 associated with mastication (duration of mastication–tcon; time required for first swallowing event–tswal), and 3 related with in-nose volatile compound concentration (area under the curve–AUC; maximum intensity–Imax; time for achieving Imax–tmax). Three different behaviors were identified in the nosespace data: a) firm samples with low AUC and tswal values (Granny Smith, Fuji), b) mealy samples with high AUC, Imax, tswal values, and low tcon (Morgen Dallago, Golden Delicious), and c) firm samples with high AUC and Imax values (Red Delicious). Strengths and limitations of the methodology are discussed.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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