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Found 71 results
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1995
[Guenther1995] Guenther, A., N. C Hewitt, D. Erickson, R. Fall, C. Geron, T. Graedel, P. Harley, L. Klinger, M. Lerdau, WA. McKay, et al., "A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions", Journal of Geophysical research, vol. 100, no. D5: American Geophysical Union, pp. 8873–8892, 1995.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/1995/94JD02950.shtml
Abstract
Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10–20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.
1999
[Boschetti1999] Boschetti, A., F. Biasioli, M. Van Opbergen, C. Warneke, A. Jordan, R. Holzinger, P. Prazeller, T. Karl, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, et al., "PTR-MS real time monitoring of the emission of volatile organic compounds during postharvest aging of berryfruit", Postharvest Biology and Technology, vol. 17, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 143–151, 1999.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925521499000526
2000
[Holzinger2000] Holzinger, R., L. Sandoval-Soto, S. Rottenberger, PJ. Crutzen, J. Kesselmeier, and , "Emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus ilex L. measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry under different environmental conditions", Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 105, no. D16, pp. 20573–20579, 2000.
Link: http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/jd0016/2000JD900296/pdf/2000JD900296.pdf
[Crutzen2000] Crutzen, PJ., J. Williams, U. Poeschl, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, B. Scheeren, et al., "High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of primary organics and their oxidation products over the tropical forests of Surinam", Atmospheric environment, vol. 34, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1161–1165, 2000.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231099004823
Abstract
Tropical forests with emissions greater than 1015 g C of reactive hydrocarbons per year strongly affect atmospheric chemistry. Here we report aircraft-borne measurements of organics during March 1998 in Surinam, a largely unpolluted region which is optimally located to study chemical processes induced by tropical forest emissions. Isoprene and its degradation products methylvinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) and possibly isoprene hydroperoxides (ISOHP), were measured in the nmol mol−1 volume mixing ratio (VMR) range, consistent with estimated emissions and model calculations. In addition, high VMRs of some non-isoprene-derived organics were measured, such as acetone (≈2–4 nmol mol1 up to 12 km altitude), an important source of HO and HO2 in the upper troposphere. Moreover, several masses were measured at significant mixing ratios which could not be identified by reference to previous field measurements or gas-phase isoprene chemistry. High VMRs, almost 0.4 nmol mol−1, were also recorded for a compound which is most likely dimethyl sulphide (DMS). If so, boundary layer loss of HO by reactions with hydrocarbons and their oxidation products strongly prolongs the lifetime of DMS, allowing its transport deep into the Amazon forest south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). We postulate greater sulphate production and deposition north than south of the (ITCZ) with possible consequences for cloud and ecosystem properties.
2001
[Poeschl2001] Pöschl, U., J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, et al., "High acetone concentrations throughout the 0–12 km altitude range over the tropical rainforest in Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 115–132, 2001.
Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006370600615
[Lelieveld2001] J Lelieveld, others., PJ. Crutzen, V. Ramanathan, MO. Andreae, CAM. Brenninkmeijer, T. Campos, GR. Cass, RR. Dickerson, H. Fischer, JA. De Gouw, et al., "The Indian Ocean experiment: widespread air pollution from South and Southeast Asia", Science, vol. 291, no. 5506: American Association for the Advancement of Science, pp. 1031–1036, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/291/5506/1031.short
Abstract
The Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) was an international, multiplatform field campaign to measure long-range transport of air pollution from South and Southeast Asia toward the Indian Ocean during the dry monsoon season in January to March 1999. Surprisingly high pollution levels were observed over the entire northern Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone at about 6°S. We show that agricultural burning and especially biofuel use enhance carbon monoxide concentrations. Fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning cause a high aerosol loading. The growing pollution in this region gives rise to extensive air quality degradation with local, regional, and global implications, including a reduction of the oxidizing power of the atmosphere.
[Stroud2001] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, PD. Goldan, WC. Kuster, PC. Murphy, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, D. Parrish, D. Sueper, M. Trainer, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein and methylvinyl ketone, at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidants Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D8: Wiley Online Library, pp. 8035–8046, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000JD900628/full
[Warneke2001a] Warneke, C., R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, U. Poeschl, J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and isoprene related peroxides measured online over the tropical rain forest of Surinam in March 1998", Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 167–185, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/u14w8w3187r33ur2.pdf
[Andreae2001] Andreae, MO., P. Artaxo, H. Fischer, , J-M. Grégoire, A. Hansel, P. Hoor, R. Kormann, R. Krejci, L. Lange, et al., "Transport of biomass burning smoke to the upper troposphere by deep convection in the equatorial region", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 6: Wiley Online Library, pp. 951–954, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000GL012391/full
2002
[Stroud2002] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, WM. Angevine, FC. Fehsenfeld, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, M. Martinez-Harder, H. Harder, et al., "Nighttime isoprene trends at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidant Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 107, no. D16: Wiley Online Library, pp. ACH–7, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000959/full
Abstract
[1] Measurements of isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride, were conducted between 13 June and 14 July 1999, at the Cornelia Fort Airpark during the Nashville intensive of the Southern Oxidant Study. Trends in isoprene and its oxidation products showed marked variability from night-to-night. The reaction between isoprene and the nitrate radical was shown to be important to the chemical budget of isoprene and often caused rapid decay of isoprene mixing ratios in the evening. Trends in methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride were steady during the evening isoprene decay period, consistent with their slow reaction rate with the nitrate radical. For cases when isoprene sustained and even increased in mixing ratio throughout the night, the observed isoprene oxidation rates via the hydroxyl radical, ozone, and the nitrate radical were all small. Sustained isoprene mixing ratios within the nocturnal boundary layer give a unique opportunity to capture hydroxyl radical photochemistry at sunrise as isoprene was observed to rapidly convert to its first stage oxidation products before vertical mixing significantly redistributed chemical species. The observed nighttime isoprene variability at urban, forested sites is related to a complex coupling between nighttime boundary layer dynamics and chemistry.
2003
[Hawes2003] Hawes, A. K., S. Solomon, R. W. Portmann, J. S. Daniel, A. O. Langford, LR. H Miller, C. S. Eubank, P. Goldan, C. Wiedinmyer, E. Atlas, et al., "Airborne observations of vegetation and implications for biogenic emission characterization", Journal of Environmental Monitoring, vol. 5, no. 6: Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 977–983, 2003.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2003/em/b308911h
Abstract
Measuring hydrocarbons from aircraft represents one way to infer biogenic emissions at the surface. The focus of this paper is to show that complementary remote sensing information can be provided by optical measurements of a vegetation index, which is readily measured with high temporal coverage using reflectance data. We examine the similarities between the vegetation index and in situ measurements of the chemicals isoprene, methacrolein, and alpha-pinene to estimate whether the temporal behavior of the in situ measurements of these chemicals could be better understood by the addition of the vegetation index. Data were compared for flights conducted around Houston in August and September 2000. The three independent sets of chemical measurements examined correspond reasonably well with the vegetation index curves for the majority of flight days. While low values of the vegetation index always correspond to low values of the in situ chemical measurements, high values of the index correspond to both high and low values of the chemical measurements. In this sense it represents an upper limit when compared with in situ data (assuming the calibration constant is adequately chosen). This result suggests that while the vegetation index cannot represent a purely predictive quantity for the in situ measurements, it represents a complementary measurement that can be useful in understanding comparisons of various in situ observations, particularly when these observations occur with relatively low temporal frequency. In situ isoprene measurements and the vegetation index were also compared to an isoprene emission inventory to provide additional insight on broad issues relating to the use of vegetation indices in emission database development.
[Guazzotti2003] Guazzotti, SA., DT. Suess, KR. Coffee, PK. Quinn, TS. Bates, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, WP. Ball, RR. Dickerson, C. Neusüß, et al., "Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 108, no. D15: American Geophysical Union, pp. 4485, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JD003277/abstract
Abstract
A major objective of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) involves the characterization of the extent and chemical composition of pollution outflow from the Indian Subcontinent during the winter monsoon. During this season, low-level flow from the continent transports pollutants over the Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Traditional standardized aerosol particle chemical analysis, together with real-time single particle and fast-response gas-phase measurements provided characterization of the sampled aerosol chemical properties. The gas- and particle-phase chemical compositions of encountered air parcels changed according to their geographic origin, which was traced by back trajectory analysis. The temporal evolutions of acetonitrile, a long-lived specific tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles with potassium (indicative of combustion sources), and mass concentration of submicrometer non-sea-salt (nss) potassium are compared. High correlation coefficients (0.84 < r2 < 0.92) are determined for these comparisons indicating that most likely the majority of the species evolve from the same, related, or proximate sources. Aerosol and trace gas measurements provide evidence that emissions from fossil fuel and biomass/biofuel burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic pollution even in areas downwind of South Asia. Specifically, high concentrations of submicrometer nss potassium, carbon-containing particles with potassium, and acetonitrile are observed in air masses advected from the Indian subcontinent, indicating a strong impact of biomass/biofuel burning in India during the sampling periods (74 (±9)% biomass/biofuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). In contrast, lower values for these same species were measured in air masses from the Arabian Peninsula, where dominance of fossil fuel combustion is suggested by results from single-particle analysis and supported by results from gas-phase measurements (63 (±9))% fossil fuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). Results presented here demonstrate the importance of simultaneous, detailed gas- and particle-phase measurements of related species when evaluating possible source contributions to aerosols in different regions of the world.
[Salisbury2003] Salisbury, G., J. Williams, R. Holzinger, V. Gros, N. Mihalopoulos, M. Vrekoussis, R. Sarda-Esteve, H. Berresheim, R. von Kuhlmann, M. Lawrence, et al., "Ground-based PTR-MS measurements of reactive organic compounds during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July–August 2001", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 3, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 925–940, 2003.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/3/925/2003/acp-3-925-2003.pdf
Abstract
This study presents measurements of acetonitrile, benzene, toluene, methanol and acetone made using the proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technique at the Finokalia ground station in Crete during the Mediterranean INtensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) in July-August 2001. Three periods during the campaign with broadly consistent back trajectories are examined in detail. In the first, air was advected from Eastern Europe without significant biomass burning influence (mean acetonitrile mixing ratio 154 pmol/mol). In the second period, the sampled air masses originated in Western Europe, and were advected approximately east-south-east, before turning south-west over the Black Sea and north-western Turkey. The third well-defined period included air masses advected from Eastern Europe passing east and south of/over the Sea of Azov, and showed significant influence by biomass burning (mean acetonitrile mixing ratio 436 pmol/mol), confirmed by satellite pictures. The mean toluene:benzene ratios observed in the three campaign periods described were 0.35, 0.37 and 0.22, respectively; the use of this quantity to determine air mass age is discussed. Methanol and acetone were generally well-correlated both with each other and with carbon monoxide throughout the campaign. Comparison of the acetone and methanol measurements with the MATCH-MPIC model showed that the model underestimated both species by a factor of 4, on average. The correlations between acetone, methanol and CO implied that the relatively high levels of methanol observed during MINOS were largely due to direct biogenic emissions, and also that biogenic sources of acetone were highly significant during MINOS ( 35%). This in turn suggests that the model deficit in both species may be due, at least in part, to missing biogenic emissions.
[Mayr2003a] Mayr, D., T. Maerk, W. Lindinger, H. Brevard, C. Yeretzian, JL. Le Quéré, PX. Étiévant, and , "In-vivo analysis of banana aroma by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry.", Flavour Research at the Dawn of the Twenty-first Century-Proceedings of the 10th Weurman Flavour Research Symposium, Beaune, France, 25-28 June, 2002.: Editions Tec & Doc, pp. 256–259, 2003.
Link: http://www.cabdirect.org/abstracts/20033185234.html
Abstract
We report on in-vivo breath-by-breath analysis of volatiles released in the mouth during eating of ripe and unripe banana using Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). The time-intensity profiles of isopentyl and isobutyl acetate, two key odour compounds of ripe, and (E)2-hexenal and hexanal, typical for unripe banana, are discussed. The questions we address is: how do retronasal aroma (nosespace, NS) and orthonasal aroma (headspace, HS) differ? Two main differences were noticed. First, the NS concentrations of some compounds are increased, compared to the HS, while others are decreased. Second, aroma in the mouth is dynamic, evolving with time. The in-mouth situation has characteristics of its own that may lead to an aromatic experience specific to the eating situation.
[Gros2003] Gros, V., J. Williams, JA. van Aardenne, G. Salisbury, R. Hofmann, MG. Lawrence, R. von Kuhlmann, J. Lelieveld, M. Krol, H. Berresheim, et al., "Origin of anthropogenic hydrocarbons and halocarbons measured in the summertime European outflow (on Crete in 2001)", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 3, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1223–1235, 2003.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/3/1223/2003/acp-3-1223-2003.pdf
[Wert2003] Wert, BP., M. Trainer, A. Fried, TB. Ryerson, B. Henry, W. Potter, WM. Angevine, E. Atlas, SG. Donnelly, FC. Fehsenfeld, et al., "Signatures of terminal alkene oxidation in airborne formaldehyde measurements during TexAQS 2000", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 108, no. D3: Wiley Online Library, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JD002502/full
Abstract
Airborne formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements were made by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) at high time resolution (1 and 10 s) and precision (±400 and ±120 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) (2σ), respectively) during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) 2000. Measurement accuracy was corroborated by in-flight calibrations and zeros and by overflight comparison with a ground-based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system. Throughout the campaign, the highest levels of CH2O precursors and volatile organic compound (VOC) reactivity were measured in petrochemical plumes. Correspondingly, CH2O and ozone production was greatly enhanced in petrochemical plumes compared with plumes dominated by power plant and mobile source emissions. The photochemistry of several isolated petrochemical facility plumes was accurately modeled using three nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) (ethene (C2H4), propene (C3H6) (both anthropogenic), and isoprene (C5H8) (biogenic)) and was in accord with standard hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated chemistry. Measurement-inferred facility emissions of ethene and propene were far larger than reported by inventories. Substantial direct CH2O emissions were not detected from petrochemical facilities. The rapid production of CH2O and ozone observed in a highly polluted plume (30+ parts per billion by volume (ppbv) CH2O and 200+ ppbv ozone) originating over Houston was well replicated by a model employing only two NMHCs, ethene and propene.
2004
[Cooper2004] Cooper, OR., C. Forster, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, E. Dunlea, T. Ryerson, G. Huebler, F. Fehsenfeld, D. Nicks, J. Holloway, et al., "A case study of transpacific warm conveyor belt transport: Influence of merging airstreams on trace gas import to North America", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 109, no. D23: American Geophysical Union, pp. D23S08, 2004.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2003JD003624.shtml
Abstract
The warm conveyor belt (WCB), the major cloud-forming airstream of midlatitude cyclones, is the primary mechanism for rapidly transporting air pollution from one continent to another. However, relatively little has been written on WCB transport across the North Pacific Ocean. To address this important intercontinental transport route, this study describes the life cycle of a WCB associated with the export of a highly polluted air mass from Asia to North America. This event was sampled using in situ measurements from an aircraft platform flying above the North American West Coast during the 2002 Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT 2K2) experiment on 5 May. Satellite imagery, trajectory ensembles, in situ measurements, and animations are used to illustrate the formation of the WCB near eastern Asia, its entrainment of polluted air masses, its transport path across the Pacific, and its decay above the eastern North Pacific Ocean and western North America. A major finding is that a WCB can entrain air from a variety of source regions and not just the atmospheric boundary layer. We estimate that 8% of the WCB's mass originated in the stratosphere and 44% passed through the lower troposphere, of which two thirds passed through the lower troposphere above the populated regions of eastern Asia. The remaining 48% traveled entirely within the middle and upper troposphere over the previous 5.5 days. Interestingly, an estimated 18% of the WCB's mass was entrained from an upwind and decaying WCB via a newly discovered but apparently common transport mechanism. Only 9% of the WCB's mass subsequently passed through the lower troposphere of the United States, with the remainder passing over North America in the middle and upper troposphere.
[Roberts2004] Roberts, DD., P. Pollien, C. Yeretzian, C. Lindinger, KD. Deibler, J. Delwiche, and , "Nosespace analysis with proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry: intra-and interpersonal variability", Handbook of flavor characterization: sensory analysis, chemistry, and physiology, vol. -, pp. 151–162, 2004.
Link: http://www.crcnetbase.com/doi/abs/10.1201/9780203912812.ch10
2005
[Herndon2005] Herndon, S. C., J. T. Jayne, M. S. Zahniser, D. R. Worsnop, B. Knighton, E. Alwine, B. K. Lamb, M. Zavala, D. D. Nelson, B. J McManus, et al., "Characterization of urban pollutant emission fluxes and ambient concentration distributions using a mobile laboratory with rapid response instrumentation", Faraday Discussions, vol. 130: Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 327–339, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2005/fd/b500411j
Abstract
A large and increasing fraction of the planet’s population lives in megacities, especially in the developing world. These large metropolitan areas generally have very high levels of both gaseous and particulate air pollutants that have severe impacts on human health, ecosystem viability, and climate on local, regional, and even continental scales. Emissions fluxes and ambient pollutant concentration distributions are generally poorly characterized for large urban areas even in developed nations. Much less is known about pollutant sources and concentration patterns in the faster growing megacities of the developing world. New methods of locating and measuring pollutant emission sources and tracking subsequent atmospheric chemical transformations and distributions are required. Measurement modes utilizing an innovative van based mobile laboratory equipped with a suite of fast response instruments to characterize the complex and “nastier” chemistry of the urban boundary layer are described. Instrumentation and measurement strategies are illustrated with examples from the Mexico City and Boston metropolitan areas. It is shown that fleet average exhaust emission ratios of formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and benzene (C6H6) are substantial in Mexico City, with gasoline powered vehicles emitting higher levels normalized by fuel consumption. NH3 exhaust emissions from newer light duty vehicles in Mexico City exceed levels from similar traffic in Boston. A mobile conditional sampling air sample collection mode designed to collect samples from intercepted emission plumes for later analysis is also described.
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.
2006
[Colomb2006] Colomb, A., J. Williams, J. Crowley, V. Gros, R. Hofmann, G. Salisbury, T. Klüpfel, R. Kormann, A. Stickler, C. Forster, et al., "Airborne measurements of trace organic species in the upper troposphere over Europe: the impact of deep convection", Environmental Chemistry, vol. 3, no. 4: CSIRO, pp. 244–259, 2006.
Link: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EN06020
Abstract
The volume mixing ratios of several organic trace gases and ozone (O3) were measured in the upper troposphere over Europe during the UTOPIHAN-ACT aircraft campaign in July 2003. The organic trace gases included alkanes, isoprene, aromatics, iodomethane, and trichloroethylene, oxygenates such as acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and longer-lived tracer species such as chlorofluorocarbons and halochloroflurocarbons. The aim of the UTOPIHAN-ACT project was to study the chemical impact of deep convection on the continental upper troposphere. A Lear Jet aircraft, based in Germany, was flown at heights between 6 and 13 km in the region 59°N–42°N to 7°W–13°E during July 2003. Overall, the convectively influenced measurements presented here show a weaker variability lifetime dependence of trace gases than similar measurements collected over the Mediterranean region under more stable high-pressure conditions. Several cases of convective outflow are identified by the elevated mixing ratios of organic species relative to quiescent background conditions, with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences detectable in the upper troposphere. Enhancement at higher altitudes, notably of species with relatively short chemical lifetimes such as benzene, toluene, and even isoprene indicates deep convection over short timescales during summertime. The impact of deep convection on the local upper tropospheric formaldehyde and HOx budgets is assessed.
[Warneke2006] Warneke, C., JA. De Gouw, A. Stohl, OR. Cooper, PD. Goldan, WC. Kuster, JS. Holloway, EJ. Williams, BM. Lerner, SA. McKeen, et al., "Biomass burning and anthropogenic sources of CO over New England in the summer 2004", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 111, no. D23: American Geophysical Union, pp. D23S15, 2006.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2005JD006878.shtml
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 large wildfires were burning in Alaska and Canada, and part of the emissions were transported toward the northeast United States, where they were measured during the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 (New England Air Quality Study–Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) study on board the NOAA WP-3 aircraft and the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown. Using acetonitrile and chloroform as tracers the biomass burning and the anthropogenic fraction of the carbon monoxide (CO) enhancement are determined. As much as 30% of the measured enhancement is attributed to the forest fires in Alaska and Canada transported into the region, and 70% is attributed to the urban emissions of mainly New York and Boston. On some days the forest fire emissions were mixed down to the surface and dominated the CO enhancement. The results compare well with the FLEXPART transport model, indicating that the total emissions during the measurement campaign for biomass burning might be about 22 Tg. The total U.S. anthropogenic CO sources used in FLEXPART are 25 Tg. FLEXPART model, using the U.S. EPA NEI-99 data, overpredicts the CO mixing ratio around Boston and New York in 2004 by about 50%.
[Zavala2006] Zavala, M., SC. Herndon, RS. Slott, EJ. Dunlea, LC. Marr, JH. Shorter, M. Zahniser, WB. Knighton, TM. Rogers, CE. Kolb, et al., "Characterization of on-road vehicle emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a mobile laboratory in chase and fleet average measurement modes during the MCMA-2003 field campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 6, no. 12: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 5129–5142, 2006.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/5129/2006/acp-6-5129-2006.html
Abstract
A mobile laboratory was used to measure on-road vehicle emission ratios during the MCMA-2003 field campaign held during the spring of 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The measured emission ratios represent a sample of emissions of in-use vehicles under real world driving conditions for the MCMA. From the relative amounts of NOx and selected VOC's sampled, the results indicate that the technique is capable of differentiating among vehicle categories and fuel type in real world driving conditions. Emission ratios for NOx, NOy, NH3, H2CO, CH3CHO, and other selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are presented for chase sampled vehicles in the form of frequency distributions as well as estimates for the fleet averaged emissions. Our measurements of emission ratios for both CNG and gasoline powered "colectivos" (public transportation buses that are intensively used in the MCMA) indicate that – in a mole per mole basis – have significantly larger NOx and aldehydes emissions ratios as compared to other sampled vehicles in the MCMA. Similarly, ratios of selected VOCs and NOy showed a strong dependence on traffic mode. These results are compared with the vehicle emissions inventory for the MCMA, other vehicle emissions measurements in the MCMA, and measurements of on-road emissions in U.S. cities. We estimate NOx emissions as 100 600±29 200 metric tons per year for light duty gasoline vehicles in the MCMA for 2003. According to these results, annual NOx emissions estimated in the emissions inventory for this category are within the range of our estimated NOx annual emissions. Our estimates for motor vehicle emissions of benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the MCMA indicate these species are present in concentrations higher than previously reported. The high motor vehicle aldehyde emissions may have an impact on the photochemistry of urban areas.
[Klemm2006] Klemm, O., A. Held, R. Forkel, R. Gasche, H-J. Kanter, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, K. Müller, A. Plewka, C. Cojocariu, et al., "Experiments on forest/atmosphere exchange: Climatology and fluxes during two summer campaigns in NE Bavaria", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 3–20, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003165
Abstract
During two summer field campaigns in 2001 and 2002, biosphere/atmosphere exchange fluxes of energy, gases, and particles were quantified in a Norway spruce forest in NE Bavaria at 775 m a.s.l. The overall goal of the BEWA campaigns was to study the influence of the emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and an overview over the meteorological conditions, experimental frame, and the achieved results is provided. A rigorous quality assurance/quality control plan was implemented. From analysis of meteorological conditions and experimental success, golden day periods were selected for coordinated data analysis. These periods cover typical summertime conditions with various wind directions, NOx mixing ratios between 2 and 10 ppb, and O3 mixing ratios ranging between 13 and 98 ppb. Diurnal patterns of trace gas concentrations resulted from the dynamics of the boundary layer, from regional atmospheric processes (for example production of O3 in the atmosphere), and deposition. Turbulence also exhibited a diurnal pattern indicating thermal production during daytime and calm conditions during nighttime. However, in many cases, turbulence was often well developed during the nights. Horizontal advection of air masses into the trunk space occurred due to the patchiness of the forest. Nevertheless, for most conditions, the application of a one-dimensional model to describe the vertical exchange processes was appropriate. Therefore, the use of one single meteorological tower to study biosphere/atmosphere exchange is valid. Measured turbulent vertical exchange fluxes were estimated to be representative within an error of less than 25%. The results for VOC concentrations and fluxes were rather heterogeneous. Both model and measurements demonstrated that the Norway spruce trees acted as a weak source of formaldehyde.
[Rogers2006] Rogers, TM., EP. Grimsrud, SC. Herndon, JT. Jayne, E. C Kolb, E. Allwine, H. Westberg, BK. Lamb, M. Zavala, LT. Molina, et al., "On-road measurements of volatile organic compounds in the Mexico City metropolitan area using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 252, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 26–37, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380606000583
Abstract
A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was redesigned and deployed to monitor selected hydrocarbon emissions from in-use vehicles as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign. This modified PTR-MS instrument provides the necessary time response (<2 s total cycle time) and sensitivity to monitor the rapidly changing hydrocarbon concentrations, within intercepted dilute exhaust emission plumes. Selected hydrocarbons including methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene were among the vehicle exhaust emission components monitored. A comparison with samples collected in canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography provides validation to the interpretation of the ion assignments and the concentrations derived using the PTR-MS. The simultaneous detection of multiple hydrocarbons in dilute vehicle exhaust plumes provides a valuable tool to study the impact of driving behavior on the exhaust gas emissions.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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