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Found 46 results
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[Aprea2005] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, G. Sani, C. Cantini, and T. D. Maerk, "Advanced oxidation in olive oil: monitoring of secondary reaction products and detection of rancid defect", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, vol. -, pp. 144, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=155
[Aprea2012] Aprea, E., F. Morisco, F. Biasioli, P. Vitaglione, L. Cappellin, C. Soukoulis, V. Lembo, F. Gasperi, G. D'Argenio, V. Fogliano, et al., "Analysis of breath by proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry in rats with steatohepatitis induced by high-fat diet.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 47, no. 9: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Department, Via E. Mach, 1, 38010, S. Michele a/A, Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 1098–1103, Sep, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3009
Abstract
Breath testing has been largely used as a diagnostic tool, but the difficulties in data interpretation and sample collection have limited its application. We developed a fast (< 20?s), on-line, non-invasive method for the collection and analysis of exhaled breath in awake rats based on proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and applied it to investigate possible relationships between pathologies induced by dietary regime and breath composition. As a case study, we investigated rats with dietary induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and modifications induced by coffee addition to the diet. We considered two different diets (standard and high fat) complemented with two different drinking possibilities (water or decaffeinated coffee) for a total of four groups with four rats each. Several spectrometric peaks were reliable markers for both dietary fat content and coffee supplementation. The high resolution and accuracy of PTR-ToF-MS allowed the identification of related compounds such as methanol, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl sulphone and ammonia. In conclusion, the rapid and minimally invasive breath analysis of awake rats permitted the identification of markers related to diet and specific pathologic conditions and provided a useful tool for broader metabolic investigations.
[Biasioli2004a] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, G. Odorizzi, E. Aprea, and D. Mott, "Applicabilità del PTR-MS al controllo degli odori negli impianti per il trattamento dei rifiuti", Rifiuti solidi, 2004.
Link: http://openpub.iasma.it/handle/10449/18438
[1548] Aprea, E., L. Cappellin, F. Gasperi, F. Morisco, V. Lembo, A. Rispo, R. Tortora, P. Vitaglione, N. Caporaso, and F. Biasioli, "Application of PTR-TOF-{MS} to investigate metabolites in exhaled breath of patients affected by coeliac disease under gluten free diet", Journal of Chromatography B, vol. 966, pp. 208–213, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2014.02.015
Abstract
<p>Coeliac disease (CD) is a common chronic inflammatory disorder of the small bowel induced in genetically susceptible people by the exposure to gliadin gluten. Even though several tests are available to assist the diagnosis, CD remains a biopsy-defined disorder, thus any non-invasive or less invasive diagnostic tool may be beneficial. The analysis of volatile metabolites in exhaled breath, given its non-invasive nature, is particularly promising as a screening tool of disease in symptomatic or non-symptomatic patients. In this preliminary study the proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometry coupled to a buffered end-tidal on-line sampler to investigate metabolites in the exhaled breath of patients affected by coeliac disease under a gluten free diet was applied. Both H3O+ or NO+ were used as precursor ions. In our investigation no differences were found in the exhaled breath of CD patients compared to healthy controls. In this study, 33 subjects were enrolled: 16 patients with CD, all adhering a gluten free diet, and 17 healthy controls. CD patients did not show any symptom of the disease at the time of breath analysis; thus the absence of discrimination from healthy controls was not surprising.</p>
[Aprea2007a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, D. Mott, F. Marini, and T. D. Maerk, "Assessment of Trentingrana cheese ageing by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and chemometrics", International dairy journal, vol. 17, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 226–234, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0958694606000501
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) data have been analysed by chemometric techniques to monitor cheese ageing by means of on-line direct head-space gas analysis. Twenty cheese loaves of Trentingrana, a trademarked cheese produced in northern Italy, of different origin and ripening degree, were sampled over the whole Trentingrana production area. An increase of the spectral intensity with ripening has been observed for most of the PTR-MS peaks and a univariate analysis identified 16 mass peaks that were significantly different for ripened and young cheeses, respectively. Moreover, the usefulness of different discriminant analyses and class modelling techniques have been investigated. Discriminant Partial Least Squares analysis, while indicating average behaviour and possible outliers, was not able to correctly classify all samples. Soft class modelling performed better and allowed a 100% correct classification. Partial least square calibration predicted the ageing time of each loaf with reasonable accuracy with a maximum cross-validation error of 3.5 months.
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[Biasioli2004b] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, D. Mott, E. Aprea, F. Marini, and TD. Maerk, "Characterization of Strawberry Genotypes by PTR-MS Spectral Fingerprinting: a Three Year Study", V International Strawberry Symposium 708, pp. 497–500, 2004.
Link: http://www.actahort.org/books/708/708_87.htm
Abstract
Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) fingerprinting has been used to accurately and rapidly identify the cultivar of single intact strawberry fruits. The technique has been applied in a 3-cultivar experiment with 70 fruits harvested in 2002, 2003 and 2004. The proposed models correctly predicted the cultivar. Cross-validation tests verified 100% correct classification. The data indicated the possibility of correctly characterizing single fruit by fast non-invasive measurements without any pre-treatment and/or concentration of the headspace gas mixture. This is a necessary preliminary step in view of correlation studies of PTR-MS data with genetics and other characterization of fruits, in particular, sensory analysis. Extension to more cultivars is envisaged.
[Biasioli2006] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, I. Endrizzi, V. Framondino, F. Marini, D. Mott, and T. D. Maerk, "Correlation of PTR-MS spectral fingerprints with sensory characterisation of flavour and odour profile of "Trentingrana" cheese", Food quality and preference, vol. 17, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 63–75, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095032930500090X
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new technique that allows the fast and accurate detection of volatile organic compounds. The paper discusses the possibility of correlating the PTR-MS spectral fingerprint of the mixture of volatile compounds present in the head-space of 20 samples of “Trentingrana”, the variety of Grana Padano produced in Trentino (Northern Italy), with the sensory evaluation (Quantitative Descriptive Analysis) of the same samples obtained by a panel of trained judges. Only attributes related to odours (six attributes) and flavours (six attributes) are considered. Results of descriptive statistics are shown and the performances of different multivariate calibration methods (Partial Least Squares, both PLS1 and PLS2) are compared by evaluating the errors in the cross-validated estimation of the sensory attributes. PLS2 seems to give a good average description providing an overall insight of the problem but does not provide an accurate prediction of the individual sensory attributes. PLS1 analysis is more accurate and performs well in most cases but it uses several latent variables, so that the interpretation of the loadings is not straightforward. The preliminary application of Orthogonal Signal Correction filtering on PTR-MS spectra followed by PLS1 analysis results in a good estimation for most of the attributes and has the advantage to use only one or two latent variables. Comparison with other works and a tentative indication of the compounds correlated with sensory description are reported.
[Biasioli2003] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, D. Mott, E. Boscaini, D. Mayr, and T. D. Maerk, "Coupling proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry with linear discriminant analysis: a case study.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 51, no. 25: Istituto Agrario di S. Michele a/A, S. Michele, Via E. Mach 2, 38010, Italy. franco.biasioli@ismaa.it, pp. 7227–7233, Dec, 2003.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf030248i
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) measurements on single intact strawberry fruits were combined with an appropriate data analysis based on compression of spectrometric data followed by class modeling. In a first experiment 8 of 9 different strawberry varieties measured on the third to fourth day after harvest could be successfully distinguished by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on PTR-MS spectra compressed by discriminant partial least squares (dPLS). In a second experiment two varieties were investigated as to whether different growing conditions (open field, tunnel), location, and/or harvesting time can affect the proposed classification method. Internal cross-validation gives 27 successes of 28 tests for the 9 varieties experiment and 100% for the 2 clones experiment (30 samples). For one clone, present in both experiments, the models developed for one experiment were successfully tested with the homogeneous independent data of the other with success rates of 100% (3 of 3) and 93% (14 of 15), respectively. This is an indication that the proposed combination of PTR-MS with discriminant analysis and class modeling provides a new and valuable tool for product classification in agroindustrial applications.
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[Schuhfried2012] Schuhfried, E., E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, C. Soukoulis, R. Viola, T. D. Maerk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Desorption kinetics with PTR-MS: Isothermal differential desorption kinetics from a heterogeneous inlet surface at ambient pressure and a new concept for compound identification", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. -: Elsevier, pp. -, 2012.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380612000292
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a soft ionization mass spectrometric technique for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with a very low limit of detection (LOD) (parts per trillion by volume) and excellent time resolution (split seconds). This makes PTR-MS a particularly interesting instrument for investigating surface desorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under realistic conditions, i.e., at ambient pressure from a heterogeneous surface. Here, we report on the investigation of heterogeneous inlet surface kinetics with PTR-MS and based thereon, develop concepts to assist compound identification in PTR-MS. First, we studied differential isothermal desorption kinetics using heterogeneous inlet surface data measured by Mikoviny et al. [7] with their newly developed high-temp-PTR-MS. The best fit to their data is obtained with bimodal pseudo-first order kinetics. In addition, we explored the normalization of the data and calculated data points of the desorption isotherms. We found evidence that the interesting part of the isotherm can be linearized in a double log plot. Then we investigated the idea to use memory effects of the inlet system to assist compound identification. At the moment, the main problem is the dependence of the kinetics on the initial equilibrium gas phase adsorption concentration, and thus, the surface coverage. As a solution, we suggest an empirical, quasi-concentration independent, yet compound specific parameter: the normalized desorption time tnd describing the decline of the signal to 1/e2 of the initial concentration, normalized to an initial concentration of 10,000 counts per second (cps). Furthermore, we investigated property–property and structure–property relationships of this new parameter. Further possible improvements are discussed as well.
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[Gasperi2009] Gasperi, F., E. Aprea, F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, I. Endrizzi, G. Pirretti, and S. Spilimbergo, "Effects of supercritical CO< sub> 2 and N< sub> 2 O pasteurisation on the quality of fresh apple juice", Food chemistry, vol. 115, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 129–136, 2009.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814608014234
Abstract
Supercritical pasteurisation is receiving increasing attention as an alternative technology for foodstuff pasteurisation, but often the possible effects on the perceptible quality are not sufficiently considered. To address this latter issue, besides standard microbial analysis, we here investigate the impact of CO2/N2O supercritical pasteurisation (100 bar, 36 °C and 10 min treatment time) on the quality traits of fresh apple juice, linked to consumer perception. Discriminative sensory analysis (triangle test) and basic chemical characterization (total solids, sugars, organic acids, polyphenols) could not clearly demonstrate any induced modification of the treated juice, while head space analysis of volatile compounds (both by GC–MS and PTR–MS) indicated a general depletion of the volatile compounds that must be considered in the development of a stabilization method based on supercritical gases.
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[Biasioli2003a] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, E. Aprea, L. Colato, E. Boscaini, and TD. Maerk, "Fingerprinting mass spectrometry by PTR-MS: heat treatment vs. pressure treatment of red orange juice - a case study", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 223: Elsevier, pp. 343–353, 2003.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380602008709
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is more and more applied to rather different fields of research and applications showing interesting performances where high sensitivity and fast monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are required. Based on this technique and aiming at the realisation of an automatic system for routine applications in food science and technology, we tested here a novel approach for fingerprinting mass spectrometric detection and analysis of complex mixtures of VOCs. In particular, we describe and discuss corresponding head space (HS) sampling methods and possible data analysis techniques. As a first test case we studied here the properties of four red orange juices processed by different stabilisation methods starting from the same industrial batch: untreated juice, thermal pasteurised (flash and standard) juice and high pressure stabilised juice. We demonstrate the possibility of a fast automatic discrimination/classification of the samples with the further advantage, compared to the use of electronic noses, of useful information on the mass of the discriminating compounds. Moreover, first comparisons with discriminative analysis by a sensory panel shows evidence that there is a correlation between the ability of the PTR-MS to distinguish different juice samples and that of a panel of trained judges with the obvious advantages of an instrumental approach.
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[Romano2013] Romano, A., L. Cappellin, V. Ting, E. Aprea, L. Navarini, M. Barnabà, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Hyphenation of PTR-ToF-MS and newly developed software provides a new effective tool for the study of inter-individual differences among tasters", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 59, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
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[JLTing2012] Ting, V. J. L., C. Soukoulis, P. Silcock, L. Cappellin, A. Romano, E. Aprea, P. J. Bremer, T. D. Märk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "In Vitro and In Vivo Flavor Release from Intact and Fresh-Cut Apple in Relation with Genetic, Textural, and Physicochemical Parameters", Journal of food science, vol. 77, no. 11: Wiley Online Library, pp. C1226–C1233, 2012.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02947.x/full
Abstract
Flavor release from 6 commercial apple cultivars (Fuji, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Morgen Dallago, and Red Delicious) under static conditions (intact or fresh-cut samples) and during consumption of fresh-cut samples (nosespace) was determined by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Textural (firmness, fracturability, flesh elasticity, and rupture) and physicochemical (pH, acidity, and water content) properties of the apples were also measured. Static headspace analysis of intact fruits revealed Fuji and Granny Smith apples had the lowest concentration for all measured flavor compounds (esters, aldehydes, alcohols, and terpenes), whereas Red Delicious apples had the highest. Fresh-cut samples generally showed a significant increase in total volatile compounds with acetaldehyde being most abundant. However, compared to intact fruits, cut Golden and Red Delicious apples had a lower intensity for ester related peaks. Five parameters were extracted from the nosespace data of peaks related to esters (m/z 43, 61), acetaldehyde (m/z 45), and ethanol (m/z 47): 2 associated with mastication (duration of mastication–tcon; time required for first swallowing event–tswal), and 3 related with in-nose volatile compound concentration (area under the curve–AUC; maximum intensity–Imax; time for achieving Imax–tmax). Three different behaviors were identified in the nosespace data: a) firm samples with low AUC and tswal values (Granny Smith, Fuji), b) mealy samples with high AUC, Imax, tswal values, and low tcon (Morgen Dallago, Golden Delicious), and c) firm samples with high AUC and Imax values (Red Delicious). Strengths and limitations of the methodology are discussed.
[Ting2012] Ting, V. J. L., C. Soukoulis, P. Silcock, L. Cappellin, A. Romano, E. Aprea, P. J. Bremer, T. D. Maerk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "In vitro and in vivo flavor release from intact and fresh-cut apple in relation with genetic, textural, and physicochemical parameters.", J Food Sci, vol. 77, no. 11: Research and Innovation Centre, Foundation Edmund Mach, via Mach 1, San Michele all' Adige, (TN), Italy., pp. C1226–C1233, Nov, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2012.02947.x
Abstract
Flavor release from 6 commercial apple cultivars (Fuji, Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Morgen Dallago, and Red Delicious) under static conditions (intact or fresh-cut samples) and during consumption of fresh-cut samples (nosespace) was determined by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Textural (firmness, fracturability, flesh elasticity, and rupture) and physicochemical (pH, acidity, and water content) properties of the apples were also measured. Static headspace analysis of intact fruits revealed Fuji and Granny Smith apples had the lowest concentration for all measured flavor compounds (esters, aldehydes, alcohols, and terpenes), whereas Red Delicious apples had the highest. Fresh-cut samples generally showed a significant increase in total volatile compounds with acetaldehyde being most abundant. However, compared to intact fruits, cut Golden and Red Delicious apples had a lower intensity for ester related peaks. Five parameters were extracted from the nosespace data of peaks related to esters (m/z 43, 61), acetaldehyde (m/z 45), and ethanol (m/z 47): 2 associated with mastication (duration of mastication-t(con); time required for first swallowing event-t(swal)), and 3 related with in-nose volatile compound concentration (area under the curve-AUC; maximum intensity-I(max); time for achieving I(max)-t(max)). Three different behaviors were identified in the nosespace data: a) firm samples with low AUC and t(swal) values (Granny Smith, Fuji), b) mealy samples with high AUC, I(max), t(swal) values, and low t(con) (Morgen Dallago, Golden Delicious), and c) firm samples with high AUC and I(max) values (Red Delicious). Strengths and limitations of the methodology are discussed. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Volatile compounds play a fundamental role in the perceived quality of food. Using apple cultivars, this research showed that in vivo proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) could be used to determine the relationship between the release of volatile flavor compounds and the physicochemical parameters of a real food matrix. This finding suggests that in vivo PTR-MS coupled with traditional physicochemical measurements could be used to yield information on flavor release from a wide range of food matrices and help in the development of strategies to enhance food flavor and quality.
[Aprea2006a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, F. Gasperi, T. D. Maerk, and S. van Ruth, "In vivo monitoring of strawberry flavour release from model custards: effect of texture and oral processing", Flavour and fragrance journal, vol. 21, no. 1: Wiley Online Library, pp. 53–58, 2006.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ffj.1702/abstract
Abstract
The interaction of oral processing protocols and food texture on in vivo flavour release was evaluated by nose-space analysis. Nose-space analysis was carried out by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and strawberry-flavoured custards were prepared with 0.1% (w/w) and 1.0% (w/w) carboxymethyl cellulose to modify the texture. Two oral processing protocols were adopted during the study; a free-chewing protocol and an imposed protocol. Twenty-one subjects participated in the study. Significant effects on in-nose flavour release were observed for the type of compound, the custard's texture, the oral processing protocol and the subjects. When people were allowed to eat as they normally do, individuals could be divided into three groups on the basis of swallowing time: first group, swallowing time <4 s; second group, swallowing time >6 s; intermediate group, t(swallow) varying (4–6 s). Within each group, different effects of the texture of the custards on in-nose flavour concentrations were observed, indicating that individual behaviour plays a considerable role in determining texture effects on flavour perception.
[Aprea2009a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, I. Endrizzi, and F. Gasperi, "Investigation of volatile compounds in two raspberry cultivars by two headspace techniques: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 57, no. 10: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Area, Via E Mach 1, S Michele all'Adige, TN 38010, Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 4011–4018, May, 2009.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf803998c
Abstract
The volatile compounds emitted by two raspberry varieties ( Rubus idaeus , cv. Polka and Tulameen) were analyzed, in both the case of fresh fruits and juices, by two headspace methods that are rapid, solvent-free, and with reduced or no sample pretreatment: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Multivariate analysis of the SPME/GC-MS results allows for an unambiguous sample discrimination for both mashed fruits and juices. PTR-MS instrumental fingerprint provides, in a faster way, similar qualitative information on the overall flavor profile. The two cultivars show both qualitative and quantitative differences. SPME/GC-MS analysis shows that alcohols and aldehydes are more abundant in the headspace of Tulameen as, e.g., hexanal and hexanol that induce herbaceous odor notes. This observation has been confirmed by sensory analysis. PTR-MS was also used to monitor rapid processes that modify the original aromatic profile, such as lipo-oxigenase activity induced by tissue damages occurring during industrial transformation, accidental mechanical damages, or as a consequence of chewing.
[Ting2013] Ting, V. J. L., C. Soukoulis, E. Aprea, P. Silcock, P. Bremer, A. Romano, L. Cappellin, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "In-vivo volatile organic compound (VOC) release from fresh-cut apple cultivars: PTR-Quad-MS and PTR-ToF-MS", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 229, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
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[Biasioli2002] Biasioli, F., F. Gasperi, and E. Aprea, "Misure di volatili organici con il PTR-MS: caratteristiche ed esempi applicativi", Settimana ambiente Italia 2002: giornate di studio: Gruppo scientifico italiano studi e ricerche, 2002.
Link: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/16609
[Aprea2008] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, G. Sani, C. Cantini, TD. Ma rk, and F. Gasperi, "Monitoraggio in linea dello spazio di testa di oli di oliva tramite proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry", Riv. Ital. Sostanze Grasse, vol. 85, pp. 92–97, 2008.
Link: http://www.fertirrigazione.it/jb/webfiles/PDF%20x%2009%20APREA%20ET%20AL%20Estratto%20RISN%202-2008.pdf
[Aprea2008a] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 275, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 117–121, 2008.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380608002285
Abstract
The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.
[Cappellin2013a] Cappellin, L., E. Aprea, P. Granitto, A. Romano, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Multiclass methods in the analysis of metabolomic datasets: The example of raspberry cultivar volatile compounds detected by GC-MS and PTR-MS", Food Research International: Elsevier, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996913000975
Abstract
Multiclass sample classification and marker selection are cutting-edge problems in metabolomics. In the present study we address the classification of 14 raspberry cultivars having different levels of gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) susceptibility. We characterized raspberry cultivars by two headspace analysis methods, namely solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (SPME/GC–MS) and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Given the high number of classes, advanced data mining methods are necessary. Random Forest (RF), Penalized Discriminant Analysis (PDA), Discriminant Partial Least Squares (dPLS) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) have been employed for cultivar classification and Random Forest-Recursive Feature Elimination (RF-RFE) has been used to perform feature selection. In particular the most important GC–MS and PTR-MS variables related to gray mold susceptibility of the selected raspberry cultivars have been investigated. Moving from GC–MS profiling to the more rapid and less invasive PTR-MS fingerprinting leads to a cultivar characterization which is still related to the corresponding Botrytis susceptibility level and therefore marker identification is still possible.
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[Biasioli2009] Biasioli, F., E. Aprea, G. Odorizzi, F. Gasperi, and T. D. Maerk, "Odour monitoring in composting plants by PTR-MS and PTR-TOF-MS", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 191, 2009.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/downloads/contributions_4th-PTR-MS_conference.pdf#page=191
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[Soukoulis2010] Soukoulis, C., E. Aprea, F. Biasioli, L. Cappellin, E. Schuhfried, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry monitoring of the evolution of volatile compounds during lactic acid fermentation of milk.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 24, no. 14: IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Food Quality and Nutrition Area, Via E. Mach, 1, 38010, S.Michele a/A, (TN), Italy., pp. 2127–3134, Jul, 2010.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.4617
Abstract
We apply, for first time, the recently developed proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) apparatus as a rapid method for the monitoring of lactic acid fermentation (LAF) of milk. PTR-TOF-MS has been proposed as a very fast, highly sensitive and versatile technique but there have been no reports of its application to dynamic biochemical processes with relevance to the food industry. LAF is a biochemical-physicochemical dynamic process particularly relevant for the dairy industry as it is an important step in the production of many dairy products. Further, LAF is important in the utilization of the by-products of the cheese industry, such as whey wastewaters. We show that PTR-TOF-MS is a powerful method for the monitoring of major volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) formed or depleted during LAF, including acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin and 2-propanone, and it also provides information about the evolution of minor VOCs such as acetic acid, 2,3-pentanedione, ethanol, and off-flavor related VOCs such as dimethyl sulfide and furfural. This can be very important considering that the conventional measurement of pH decrease during LAF is often ineffective due to the reduced response of pH electrodes resulting from the formation of protein sediments. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) data on the inoculated milk base and final fermented product are also presented to supporting peak identification. We demonstrate that PTR-TOF-MS can be used as a rapid, efficient and non-invasive method for the monitoring of LAF from headspace, supplying important data about the quality of the final product and that it may be used to monitor the efficacy of manufacturing practices.
[Soukoulis2011] Soukoulis, C., F. Biasioli, E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, and F. Gasperi, "Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry to determine changes in flavor compounds during Lagrein red wine maturation in wooden and stainless steel vessels", XIII Weurman flavour research symposium, 27-30 September 2011, Zaragoza, Spain, 2011.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Aprea2006] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, G. Sani, C. Cantini, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) headspace analysis for rapid detection of oxidative alteration of olive oil.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 54, no. 20: Agri-Food Quality Department, IASMA Research Center, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all'Adige (TN), Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 7635–7640, Oct, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf060970r
Abstract
Olive oil has been characterized by rapid proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) headspace analysis without any concentration of the volatiles or pretreatment of the samples. Comparison of extra virgin and defective (rancid) samples, as described by a panel of sensory judges, and the monitoring of thermo-oxidation processes are discussed. Multivariate analysis of PTR-MS data has been carried out and cross-validated, providing (i) reliable classification models for extra virgin oil as opposed to defective oil and (ii) calibration models able to predict independently thermo-oxidative degradation and the corresponding peroxide value. PTR-MS fragmentation patterns of volatiles considered in this study are also reported.

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F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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