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Found 21 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
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2012
[Sinha2012a] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "Constraints on instantaneous ozone production rates and regimes during DOMINO derived using in-situ OH reactivity measurements", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 15: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 7269–7283, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/7269/2012/acp-12-7269-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21/11/2008 to 08/12/2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 s−1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[Nolscher2012a] Nölscher, AC., V. Sinha, S. Bockisch, T. Klüpfel, and J. Williams, "A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions, vol. 5, no. 3: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 3575–3609, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech-discuss.net/5/3575/2012/
Abstract
The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60–70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3–6 s−1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical alternative for groups interested in total OH reactivity observations.
[Sinha2012] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "OH reactivity measurements in a coastal location in Southwestern Spain during DOMINO", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, no. 2: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4979–5014, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/12/4979/2012/acpd-12-4979-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21 November 2008 to 8 December 2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 −1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[Nolscher2012] Nölscher, AC., J. Williams, V. Sinha, T. Custer, W. Song, AM. Johnson, R. Axinte, H. Bozem, H. Fischer, N. Pouvesle, et al., "Summertime total OH reactivity measurements from boreal forest during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 17: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 8257–8270, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/8257/2012/acp-12-8257-2012.html
Abstract
Ambient total OH reactivity was measured at the Finnish boreal forest station SMEAR II in Hyytiälä (Latitude 61°51' N; Longitude 24°17' E) in July and August 2010 using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM). The CRM – total OH reactivity method – is a direct, in-situ determination of the total loss rate of hydroxyl radicals (OH) caused by all reactive species in air. During the intensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study) the total OH reactivity was monitored both inside (18 m) and directly above the forest canopy (24 m) for the first time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements, absolute values and the temporal variation have been analyzed here. Stable boundary layer conditions during night and turbulent mixing in the daytime induced low and high short-term variability, respectively. The impact on total OH reactivity from biogenic emissions and associated photochemical products was measured under "normal" and "stressed" (i.e. prolonged high temperature) conditions. The advection of biomass burning emissions to the site caused a marked change in the total OH reactivity vertical profile. By comparing the OH reactivity contribution from individually measured compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity, the size of any unaccounted for or "missing" sink can be deduced for various atmospheric influences. For "normal" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 58%, whereas for "stressed" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 89% was determined. Various sources of not quantified OH reactive species are proposed as possible explanation for the high missing OH reactivity.
[Dolgorouky2012] Dolgorouky, C., V. Gros, R. Sarda-Esteve, V. Sinha, J. Williams, N. Marchand, S. Sauvage, L. Poulain, J. Sciare, and B. Bonsang, "Total OH reactivity measurements in Paris during the 2010 MEGAPOLI winter campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 20: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 9593–9612, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/9593/2012/
Abstract
Hydroxyl radicals play a central role in the troposphere as they control the lifetime of many trace gases. Measurement of OH reactivity (OH loss rate) is important to better constrain the OH budget and also to evaluate the completeness of measured VOC budget. Total atmospheric OH reactivity was measured for the first time in an European Megacity: Paris and its surrounding areas with 12 million inhabitants, during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign 2010. The method deployed was the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM). The measured dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from CO, NOx and VOCs measured via PTR-MS, GC-FID and GC-MS instruments. The reactivities observed in Paris covered a range from 10 s−1 to 130 s−1, indicating a large loading of chemical reactants. The present study showed that, when clean marine air masses influenced Paris, the purely local OH reactivity (20 s−1) is well explained by the measured species. Nevertheless, when there is a continental import of air masses, high levels of OH reactivity were obtained (120–130 s−1) and the missing OH reactivity measured in this case jumped to 75%. Using covariations of the missing OH reactivity to secondary inorganic species in fine aerosols, we suggest that the missing OH reactants were most likely highly oxidized compounds issued from photochemically processed air masses of anthropogenic origin.
2011
[Mogensen2011] Mogensen, D., S. Smolander, A. Sogachev, L. Zhou, V. Sinha, A. Guenther, J. Williams, T. Nieminen, MK. Kajos, J. Rinne, et al., "Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, no. 18: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 9709–9719, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/9709/
[Williams2011] Williams, J., J. Crowley, H. Fischer, H. Harder, M. Martinez, T. Petäjä, J. Rinne, J. Bäck, M. Boy, M. Dal Maso, et al., "The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 11, no. 5: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 15921–15973, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/11/15921/2011/acpd-11-15921-2011.html
Abstract
This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce); mixed forest (Birch and conifers); and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen); indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO), urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2) and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes). None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.
2010
[Holzinger2010] Holzinger, R., J. Williams, F. Herrmann, J. Lelieveld, NM. Donahue, and T. Roeckmann, "Aerosol analysis using a Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-MS): a new approach to study processing of organic aerosols", Atmospheric chemistry and physics, vol. 10, no. 5: Copernicus Publications, pp. 2257–2267, 2010.
Link: http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/phys/2011-0323-200410/UUindex.html
Abstract
We present a novel analytical approach to measure the chemical composition of organic aerosol. The new instrument combines proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) with a collection-thermal-desorption aerosol sampling technique. For secondary organic aerosol produced from the reaction of ozone with isoprenoids in a laboratory reactor, the TD-PTR-MS instrument detected typically 80% of the mass that was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The first field deployment of the instrument was the EUCAARI-IOP campaign at the CESAR tall tower site in the Netherlands. For masses with low background values (∼30% of all masses) the detection limit of aerosol compounds was below 0.2 ng/m3 which corresponds to a sampled compound mass of 35 pg. Comparison of thermograms from ambient samples and from chamber-derived secondary organic aerosol shows that, in general, organic compounds from ambient aerosol samples desorb at much higher temperatures than chamber samples. This suggests that chamber aerosol is not a good surrogate for ambient aerosol and therefore caution is advised when extrapolating results from chamber experiments to ambient conditions
[Sinha2010] Sinha, V., J. Williams, J. Lelieveld, TM. Ruuskanen, MK. Kajos, J. Patokoski, H. Hellen, H. Hakola, D. Mogensen, M. Boy, et al., "OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest: evidence for unknown reactive emissions", Environmental science & technology, vol. 44, no. 17: ACS Publications, pp. 6614–6620, 2010.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es101780b
Abstract
Boreal forests emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which react with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to influence regional ozone levels and form secondary organic aerosol. Using OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest in Finland, we investigated the budget of reactive VOCs. OH reactivity was measured using the comparative reactivity method, whereas 30 individual VOCs were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, thermal-desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, in August 2008. The measured OH reactivity ranged from below detection limit (3.5 s−1), to 60 s−1 in a single pollution event. The average OH reactivity was 9 s−1 and no diel variation was observed in the profiles. The measured OH sinks (30 species) accounted for only 50% of the total measured OH reactivity, implying unknown reactive VOCs within the forest. The five highest measured OH sinks were: monoterpenes (1 s−1), CO (0.7 s−1), isoprene (0.5 s−1), propanal and acetone (0.3 s−1), and methane (0.3 s−1). We suggest that models be constrained by direct OH reactivity measurements to accurately assess the impact of boreal forest emissions on regional atmospheric chemistry and climate.
2009
[Sinha2009] Sinha, V., TG. Custer, T. Kluepfel, and J. Williams, "The effect of relative humidity on the detection of pyrrole by PTR-MS for OH reactivity measurements", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 282, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 108–111, 2009.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380609000700
Abstract
The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important atmospheric oxidant. Recently Sinha et al. [V. Sinha, J. Williams, J.N. Crowley, J. Lelieveld, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8 (2008) 2213] developed a new method to measure the total OH reactivity of ambient air (OH sink) employing a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) as a detector. The new method uses pyrrole (C4H4NH) as a reagent and for an OH reactivity measurement this species must be measured under both dry (∼0% RH) and humid air (>30% RH). Here, we investigate the sensitivity dependence of the PTR-MS for pyrrole, as a function of relative humidity in the sampled air. Various normalizations with respect to the H3O+ ion and its different hydrated cluster ions H3O+(H2O)n=1,2,3 are compared. It is shown that both the primary ion signal (H3O+ ion m/z = 19) and the first water cluster ion H3O+(H2O) (m/z = 37) should be used for pyrrole quantification. However, in spite of using this normalization, the PTR-MS sensitivity for pyrrole changes by as much as 16% between dry (∼0% RH) and humid air (above 30% RH), with higher sensitivity when the sampled air is humid. Thus, for accurate quantification of pyrrole using a PTR-MS, calibration factors appropriate to dry and humid air should be employed. We recommend that humidity dependence of the PTR-MS be taken into account when reactivity measurements are performed using the pyrrole based comparative reactivity method (CRM).
[Eerdekens2009a] Eerdekens, G., L. Ganzeveld, V-G. J de Arellano, T. Klüpfel, V. Sinha, N. Yassaa, J. Williams, H. Harder, D. Kubistin, M. Martinez, et al., "Flux estimates of isoprene, methanol and acetone from airborne PTR-MS measurements over the tropical rainforest during the GABRIEL 2005 campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 13: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4207–4227, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/4207/2009/acp-9-4207-2009.html
Abstract
Tropical forests are a strong source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to the atmosphere which can potentially impact the atmospheric oxidation capacity. Here we present airborne and ground-based BVOC measurements representative for the long dry season covering a large area of the northern Amazonian rainforest (6–3° N, 50–59° W). The measurements were conducted during the October 2005 GABRIEL (Guyanas Atmosphere-Biosphere exchange and Radicals Intensive Experiment with the Learjet) campaign. The vertical (35 m to 10 km) and diurnal (09:00–16:00) profiles of isoprene, its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone and methanol and acetone, measured by PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry), have been used to empirically estimate their emission fluxes from the forest canopy on a regional scale. The mixed layer isoprene emission flux, inferred from the airborne measurements above 300 m, is 5.7 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 after compensating for chemistry and  6.9 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 taking detrainment into account. This surface flux is in general agreement with previous tropical forest studies. Inferred methanol and acetone emission fluxes are 0.5 mg methanol m−2 h−1 and 0.35 mg acetone m−2 h−1, respectively. The BVOC measurements were compared with fluxes and mixing ratios simulated with a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM). The inferred isoprene flux is substantially smaller than that simulated with an implementation of a commonly applied BVOC emission algorithm in the SCM.
[Eerdekens2009] Eerdekens, G., N. Yassaa, V. Sinha, PP. Aalto, H. Aufmhoff, F. Arnold, V. Fiedler, M. Kulmala, and J. Williams, "VOC measurements within a boreal forest during spring 2005: on the occurrence of elevated monoterpene concentrations during night time intense particle concentration events", Atmos. Chem. Phys, vol. 9, no. 21, pp. 8331–8350, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/8331/2009/acp-9-8331-2009.html
Abstract
In this study we present measurements of selected trace gases and aerosols made in a boreal forest during the BACCI-QUEST IV intensive field campaign in Hyytiälä, Finland in April 2005. Springtime diel and vertical variations of VOCs are discussed in connection with the variations in other trace gases and with the prevailing meteorological conditions. A daytime and a nighttime event have been analysed in detail. The nighttime particle event occurred synchronously with huge increases in monoterpenes, while the second event type involved nucleation and was anti-correlated with sulphuric acid. Here we discuss the possible origins of these two distinct forms of aerosol production at the Hyytiälä site using the measurement data, air mass back trajectories and the optical stereoisomery of monoterpenes. Optical stereoisomery is used in source identification to distinguish between unnatural and natural monoterpene emissions.
2008
[Sinha2008] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JN. Crowley, and J. Lelieveld, "The Comparative Reactivity Method–a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 8, no. 8: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 2213–2227, 2008.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/2213/2008/acp-8-2213-2008.pdf
2007
[Sinha2007] Sinha, V., J. Williams, M. Meyerhöfer, U. Riebesell, AI. Paulino, and A. Larsen, "Air-sea fluxes of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and DMS from a Norwegian fjord following a phytoplankton bloom in a mesocosm experiment", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 7, no. 3: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 739–755, 2007.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/739/2007/acp-7-739-2007.html
Abstract
{The ocean's influence on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is poorly understood. This work characterises the oceanic emission and/or uptake of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, isoprene and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) as a function of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and a suite of biological parameters. The measurements were taken following a phytoplankton bloom, in May/June 2005 with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), from mesocosm enclosures anchored in the Raunefjord, Southern Norway. The net flux of methanol was always into the ocean, and was stronger at night. Isoprene and acetaldehyde were emitted from the ocean, correlating with light (ravcorr
2005
[Reus2005] de Reus, M., H. Fischer, R. Sander, V. Gros, R. Kormann, G. Salisbury, R. Van Dingenen, J. Williams, M. Zöllner, and J. Lelieveld, "Observations and model calculations of trace gas scavenging in a dense Saharan dust plume during MINATROC", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 7: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1787–1803, 2005.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/5/1787/
2003
[Salisbury2003] Salisbury, G., J. Williams, R. Holzinger, V. Gros, N. Mihalopoulos, M. Vrekoussis, R. Sarda-Esteve, H. Berresheim, R. von Kuhlmann, M. Lawrence, et al., "Ground-based PTR-MS measurements of reactive organic compounds during the MINOS campaign in Crete, July–August 2001", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 3, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 925–940, 2003.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/3/925/2003/acp-3-925-2003.pdf
Abstract
This study presents measurements of acetonitrile, benzene, toluene, methanol and acetone made using the proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) technique at the Finokalia ground station in Crete during the Mediterranean INtensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) in July-August 2001. Three periods during the campaign with broadly consistent back trajectories are examined in detail. In the first, air was advected from Eastern Europe without significant biomass burning influence (mean acetonitrile mixing ratio 154 pmol/mol). In the second period, the sampled air masses originated in Western Europe, and were advected approximately east-south-east, before turning south-west over the Black Sea and north-western Turkey. The third well-defined period included air masses advected from Eastern Europe passing east and south of/over the Sea of Azov, and showed significant influence by biomass burning (mean acetonitrile mixing ratio 436 pmol/mol), confirmed by satellite pictures. The mean toluene:benzene ratios observed in the three campaign periods described were 0.35, 0.37 and 0.22, respectively; the use of this quantity to determine air mass age is discussed. Methanol and acetone were generally well-correlated both with each other and with carbon monoxide throughout the campaign. Comparison of the acetone and methanol measurements with the MATCH-MPIC model showed that the model underestimated both species by a factor of 4, on average. The correlations between acetone, methanol and CO implied that the relatively high levels of methanol observed during MINOS were largely due to direct biogenic emissions, and also that biogenic sources of acetone were highly significant during MINOS ( 35%). This in turn suggests that the model deficit in both species may be due, at least in part, to missing biogenic emissions.
[Gros2003] Gros, V., J. Williams, JA. van Aardenne, G. Salisbury, R. Hofmann, MG. Lawrence, R. von Kuhlmann, J. Lelieveld, M. Krol, H. Berresheim, et al., "Origin of anthropogenic hydrocarbons and halocarbons measured in the summertime European outflow (on Crete in 2001)", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 3, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1223–1235, 2003.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/3/1223/2003/acp-3-1223-2003.pdf
2001
[Williams2001] Williams, J., U. Poeschl, PJ. Crutzen, A. Hansel, R. Holzinger, C. Warneke, W. Lindinger, and J. Lelieveld, "An atmospheric chemistry interpretation of mass scans obtained from a proton transfer mass spectrometer flown over the tropical rainforest of Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 133–166, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/v26n6440307112k1.pdf
[Poeschl2001] Pöschl, U., J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, et al., "High acetone concentrations throughout the 0–12 km altitude range over the tropical rainforest in Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 115–132, 2001.
Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006370600615
[Warneke2001a] Warneke, C., R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, U. Poeschl, J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and isoprene related peroxides measured online over the tropical rain forest of Surinam in March 1998", Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 167–185, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/u14w8w3187r33ur2.pdf
2000
[Crutzen2000] Crutzen, PJ., J. Williams, U. Poeschl, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, B. Scheeren, et al., "High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of primary organics and their oxidation products over the tropical forests of Surinam", Atmospheric environment, vol. 34, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1161–1165, 2000.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231099004823
Abstract
Tropical forests with emissions greater than 1015 g C of reactive hydrocarbons per year strongly affect atmospheric chemistry. Here we report aircraft-borne measurements of organics during March 1998 in Surinam, a largely unpolluted region which is optimally located to study chemical processes induced by tropical forest emissions. Isoprene and its degradation products methylvinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) and possibly isoprene hydroperoxides (ISOHP), were measured in the nmol mol−1 volume mixing ratio (VMR) range, consistent with estimated emissions and model calculations. In addition, high VMRs of some non-isoprene-derived organics were measured, such as acetone (≈2–4 nmol mol1 up to 12 km altitude), an important source of HO and HO2 in the upper troposphere. Moreover, several masses were measured at significant mixing ratios which could not be identified by reference to previous field measurements or gas-phase isoprene chemistry. High VMRs, almost 0.4 nmol mol−1, were also recorded for a compound which is most likely dimethyl sulphide (DMS). If so, boundary layer loss of HO by reactions with hydrocarbons and their oxidation products strongly prolongs the lifetime of DMS, allowing its transport deep into the Amazon forest south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). We postulate greater sulphate production and deposition north than south of the (ITCZ) with possible consequences for cloud and ecosystem properties.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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