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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 4 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Unterkofler, Karl  [Clear All Filters]
2014
[1643] Mochalski, P., K. Unterkofler, P. Spanel, D. Smith, and A. Amann, "Product ion distributions for the reactions of NO(+) with some physiologically significant aldehydes obtained using a SRI-TOF-MS instrument.", Int J Mass Spectrom, vol. 363, pp. 23–31, Apr, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijms.2014.02.016
Abstract
<p>Product ion distributions for the reactions of NO(+) with 22 aldehydes involved in human physiology have been determined under the prevailing conditions of a selective reagent ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SRI-TOF-MS) at an E/N in the flow/drift tube reactor of 130 Td. The chosen aldehydes were fourteen alkanals (the C2-C11 n-alkanals, 2-methyl propanal, 2-methyl butanal, 3-methyl butanal, and 2-ethyl hexanal), six alkenals (2-propenal, 2-methyl 2-propenal, 2-butenal, 3-methyl 2-butenal, 2-methyl 2-butenal, and 2-undecenal), benzaldehyde, and furfural. The product ion fragmentations patterns were determined for both dry air and humid air (3.5% absolute humidity) used as the matrix buffer/carrier gas in the drift tube of the SRI-TOF-MS instrument. Hydride ion transfer was seen to be a common ionization mechanism in all these aldehydes, thus generating (M-H)(+) ions. Small fractions of the adduct ion, NO(+)M, were also seen for some of the unsaturated alkenals, in particular 2-undecenal, and heterocyclic furfural for which the major reactive channel was non-dissociative charge transfer generating the M(+) parent ion. Almost all of the reactions resulted in partial fragmentation of the aldehyde molecules generating hydrocarbon ions; specifically, the alkanal reactions resulted in multiple product ions, whereas, the alkenals reactions produced only two or three product ions, dissociation of the nascent excited product ion occurring preferentially at the 2-position. The findings of this study are of particular importance for data interpretation in studies of aldehydes reactions employing SRI-TOF-MS in the NO(+) mode.</p>
2012
[King2012] King, J., K. Unterkofler, G. Teschl, S. Teschl, P. Mochalski, H. Koc, H. Hinterhuber, and A. Amann, "A modeling-based evaluation of isothermal rebreathing for breath gas analyses of highly soluble volatile organic compounds", Journal of breath research, vol. 6, no. 1: IOP Publishing, pp. 016005, 2012.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/1752-7163/6/1/016005
Abstract
Isothermal rebreathing has been proposed as an experimental technique for estimating the alveolar levels of hydrophilic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath. Using the prototypic test compounds acetone and methanol, we demonstrate that the end-tidal breath profiles of such substances during isothermal rebreathing show a characteristic increase that contradicts the conventional pulmonary inert gas elimination theory due to Farhi. On the other hand, these profiles can reliably be captured by virtue of a previously developed mathematical model for the general exhalation kinetics of highly soluble, blood-borne VOCs, which explicitly takes into account airway gas exchange as a major determinant of the observable breath output. This model allows for a mechanistic analysis of various rebreathing protocols suggested in the literature. In particular, it predicts that the end-exhaled levels of acetone and methanol measured during free tidal breathing will underestimate the underlying alveolar concentration by a factor of up to 1.5. Moreover, it clarifies the discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo blood–breath ratios of hydrophilic VOCs and yields further quantitative insights into the physiological components of isothermal rebreathing and highly soluble gas exchange in general.
2009
[Amann2009] Amann, A., J. King, A. Kupferthaler, K. Unterkofler, H. Koc, S. Teschl, and H. Hinterhuber, "Exhaled breath analysis-quantifying the storage of lipophilic compounds in the human body", Proceedings of Ecopole, vol. 3, pp. 9–13, 2009.
Link: http://staff.technikum-wien.at/ teschl/ProcECOpole2009_AKKUKTH.pdf
2008
[Kushch2008] Kushch, I., K. Schwarz, L. Schwentner, B. Baumann, A. Dzien, A. Schmid, K. Unterkofler, G. Gastl, P. Span?l, D. Smith, et al., "Compounds enhanced in a mass spectrometric profile of smokers' exhaled breath versus non-smokers as determined in a pilot study using PTR-MS.", J Breath Res, vol. 2, no. 2: Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria. Breath Research Unit of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dammstrasse 22, A-6850 Dornbirn, Austria., pp. 026002, Jun, 2008.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1752-7155/2/2/026002
Abstract
{A pilot study has been carried out to define typical characteristics of the trace gas compounds in exhaled breath of non-smokers and smokers to assist interpretation of breath analysis data from patients who smoke with respiratory diseases and lung cancer. Exhaled breath was analyzed using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for 370 volunteers (81 smokers, 210 non-smokers, 79 ex-smokers). Volatile organic compounds corresponding to product ions at seven mass-to-charge ratios (m/z 28, 42, 69, 79, 93, 97, 123) in the PTR-MS spectra differentiated between smokers and non-smokers. The Youden index (= maximum of sensitivity + specificity - 1, YI) as a measure for differentiation between smokers and non-smokers was YI = 0.43 for ions at the m/z values 28 (tentatively identified as HCN)

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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