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Found 47 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Hansel, Armin  [Clear All Filters]
2006
[Graus2006] Graus, M., A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, C. Lindinger, R. Forkel, K. Hauff, M. Klauer, A. Pfichner, B. Rappenglück, D. Steigner, et al., "A relaxed-eddy-accumulation method for the measurement of isoprenoid canopy-fluxes using an online gas-chromatographic technique and PTR-MS simultaneously", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 43–54, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003190
Abstract
A relaxed-eddy-accumulation set-up using an online gas-chromatographic technique and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was applied to determine isoprenoid fluxes above a Norway spruce forest in July 2001/2002. The system was quality assured and its suitability for determination of canopy fluxes of isoprenoids was demonstrated. Flux measurements of oxygenated hydrocarbons failed the data quality check due to artefacts presumably arising from line and ozone-scrubber effects. Observations of turbulent fluxes of isoprenoids during the two field experiments show good agreements with primary flux data derived from enclosure measurements and modelling results using a canopy-chemistry emission model (CACHE).
[Forkel2006] Forkel, R., O. Klemm, M. Graus, B. Rappenglück, W. R. Stockwell, W. Grabmer, A. Held, A. Hansel, and R. Steinbrecher, "Trace gas exchange and gas phase chemistry in a Norway spruce forest: A study with a coupled 1-dimensional canopy atmospheric chemistry emission model", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 28–42, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003189
Abstract
Numerical modelling is an efficient tool to investigate the role of chemical degradation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) and the effect of dynamical processes on BVOC and product mixing ratios within and above forest canopies. The present study shows an application of the coupled canopy-chemistry model CACHE to a Norway spruce forest at the Waldstein (Fichtelgebirge, Germany). Simulated courses of temperature, trace gas mixing ratios, and fluxes are compared with measurements taken during the BEWA2000 field campaigns. The model permits the interpretation of the observed diurnal course of ozone and VOC by investigating the role of turbulent exchange, chemical formation and degradation, emission, and deposition during the course of the day. The simulation results show that BVOC fluxes into the atmosphere are 10–15% lower than the emission fluxes on branch basis due to chemical BVOC degradation within the canopy. BVOC degradation by the NO3 radical was found to occur in the lower part of the canopy also during daytime. Furthermore, the simulations strongly indicate that further research is still necessary concerning the emission and deposition of aldehydes and ketones.
2005
[DAnna2005] D'Anna, B., A. Wisthaler, Øyvind. Andreasen, A. Hansel, J. Hjorth, N. R. Jensen, C. J. Nielsen, Y. Stenstrøm, and J. Viidanoja, "Atmospheric chemistry of C3-C6 cycloalkanecarbaldehydes.", J Phys Chem A, vol. 109, no. 23: Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo, Norway. barbara.danna@kjemi.uio.no, pp. 5104–5118, Jun, 2005.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp044495g
Abstract
The rate coefficients for the gas phase reaction of NO3 and OH radicals with a series of cycloalkanecarbaldehydes have been measured in purified air at 298 +/- 2 K and 760 +/- 10 Torr by the relative rate method using a static reactor equipped with long-path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection. The values obtained for the OH radical reactions (in units of 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 2.13 +/- 0.05; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 2.66 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 3.27 +/- 0.07; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.75 +/- 0.05. The values obtained for the NO3 radical reactions (in units of 10(-14) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1)) were the following: cyclopropanecarbaldehyde, 0.61 +/- 0.04; cyclobutanecarbaldehyde, 1.99 +/- 0.06; cyclopentanecarbaldehyde, 2.55 +/- 0.10; cyclohexanecarbaldehyde, 3.19 +/- 0.12. Furthermore, the reaction products with OH radicals have been investigated using long-path FT-IR spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The measured carbon balances were in the range 89-97%, and the identified products cover a wide spectrum of compounds including nitroperoxycarbonyl cycloalkanes, cycloketones, cycloalkyl nitrates, multifunctional compounds containing carbonyl, hydroxy, and nitrooxy functional groups, HCOOH, HCHO, CO, and CO2.
[Jacob2005] Jacob, D. J., B. D. Field, Q. Li, D. R. Blake, J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, H. B. Singh, and A. Guenther, "Global budget of methanol: Constraints from atmospheric observations", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 110, no. D8: Wiley Online Library, 2005.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2004JD005172/full
Abstract
We use a global three-dimensional model simulation of atmospheric methanol to examine the consistency between observed atmospheric concentrations and current understanding of sources and sinks. Global sources in the model include 128 Tg yr−1 from plant growth, 38 Tg yr−1 from atmospheric reactions of CH3O2 with itself and other organic peroxy radicals, 23 Tg yr−1 from plant decay, 13 Tg yr−1 from biomass burning and biofuels, and 4 Tg yr−1 from vehicles and industry. The plant growth source is a factor of 3 higher for young than from mature leaves. The atmospheric lifetime of methanol in the model is 7 days; gas-phase oxidation by OH accounts for 63% of the global sink, dry deposition to land 26%, wet deposition 6%, uptake by the ocean 5%, and aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds less than 1%. The resulting simulation of atmospheric concentrations is generally unbiased in the Northern Hemisphere and reproduces the observed correlations of methanol with acetone, HCN, and CO in Asian outflow. Accounting for decreasing emission from leaves as they age is necessary to reproduce the observed seasonal variation of methanol concentrations at northern midlatitudes. The main model discrepancy is over the South Pacific, where simulated concentrations are a factor of 2 too low. Atmospheric production from the CH3O2 self-reaction is the dominant model source in this region. A factor of 2 increase in this source (to 50–100 Tg yr−1) would largely correct the discrepancy and appears consistent with independent constraints on CH3O2 concentrations. Our resulting best estimate of the global source of methanol is 240 Tg yr−1. More observations of methanol concentrations and fluxes are needed over tropical continents. Better knowledge is needed of CH3O2 concentrations in the remote troposphere and of the underlying organic chemistry.
[Beauchamp2005] Beauchamp, J., A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, E. Kleist, M. Miebach, ÜLO. NIINEMETS, U. Schurr, and JÜRGEN. WILDT, "Ozone induced emissions of biogenic VOC from tobacco: relationships between ozone uptake and emission of LOX products", Plant, Cell & Environment, vol. 28, no. 10: Wiley Online Library, pp. 1334–1343, 2005.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2005.01383.x/full
Abstract
Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3) plants exposed to ozone (O3) were investigated using proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) to find a quantitative reference for plants’ responses to O3 stress. O3 exposures to illuminated plants induced post-exposure VOC emission bursts. The lag time for the onset of volatile C6 emissions produced within the octadecanoid pathway was found to be inversely proportional to O3 uptake, or more precisely, to the O3 flux density into the plants. In cases of short O3 pulses of identical duration the total amount of these emitted C6 VOC was related to the O3 flux density into the plants, and not to ozone concentrations or dose–response relationships such as AOT 40 values. Approximately one C6 product was emitted per five O3 molecules taken up by the plant. A threshold flux density of O3 inducing emissions of C6 products was found to be (1.6 ± 0.7) × 10−8 mol m−2 s−1.
[Wisthaler2005] Wisthaler, A., G. Tamás, D. P. Wyon, P. Strøm-Tejsen, D. Space, J. Beauchamp, A. Hansel, T. D. Maerk, and C. J. Weschler, "Products of ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated aircraft environment.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 39, no. 13: International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark., pp. 4823–4832, Jul, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es047992j
Abstract
We used proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the products formed when ozone reacted with the materials in a simulated aircraft cabin, including a loaded high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in the return air system. Four conditions were examined: cabin (baseline), cabin plus ozone, cabin plus soiled T-shirts (surrogates for human occupants), and cabin plus soiled T-shirts plus ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin without T-shirts, at concentrations typically encountered during commercial air travel, increased the mixing ratio (v:v concentration) of detected pollutants from 35 ppb to 80 ppb. Most of this increase was due to the production of saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and tentatively identified low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids. The addition of soiled T-shirts, with no ozone present, increased the mixing ratio of pollutants in the cabin air only slightly, whereas the combination of soiled T-shirts and ozone increased the mixing ratio of detected pollutants to 110 ppb, with more than 20 ppb originating from squalene oxidation products (acetone, 4-oxopentanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one). For the two conditions with ozone present, the more-abundant oxidation products included acetone/propanal (8-20 ppb), formaldehyde (8-10 ppb), nonanal (approximately 6 ppb), 4-oxopentanal (3-7 ppb), acetic acid (approximately 7 ppb), formic acid (approximately 3 ppb), and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (0.5-2.5 ppb), as well as compounds tentatively identified as acrolein (0.6-1 ppb) and crotonaldehyde (0.6-0.8 ppb). The odor thresholds of certain products were exceeded. With an outdoor air exchange of 3 h(-1) and a recirculation rate of 20 h(-1), the measured ozone surface removal rate constant was 6.3 h(-1) when T-shirts were not present, compared to 11.4 h(-1) when T-shirts were present.
2004
[Schnitzler2004] SCHNITZLER, JÖRG-PETER., M. Graus, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Contribution of different carbon sources to isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves", Plant Physiology, vol. 135, no. 1: Am Soc Plant Biol, pp. 152–160, 2004.
Link: http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/135/1/152.short
Abstract
This study was performed to test if alternative carbon sources besides recently photosynthetically fixed CO2 are used for isoprene formation in the leaves of young poplar (Populus × canescens) trees. In a 13CO2 atmosphere under steady state conditions, only about 75% of isoprene became 13C labeled within minutes. A considerable part of the unlabeled carbon may be derived from xylem transported carbohydrates, as may be shown by feeding leaves with [U-13C]Glc. As a consequence of this treatment approximately 8% to 10% of the carbon emitted as isoprene was 13C labeled. In order to identify further carbon sources, poplar leaves were depleted of leaf internal carbon pools and the carbon pools were refilled with 13C labeled carbon by exposure to 13CO2. Results from this treatment showed that about 30% of isoprene carbon became 13C labeled, clearly suggesting that, in addition to xylem transported carbon and CO2, leaf internal carbon pools, e.g. starch, are used for isoprene formation. This use was even increased when net assimilation was reduced, for example by abscisic acid application. The data provide clear evidence of a dynamic exchange of carbon between different cellular precursors for isoprene biosynthesis, and an increasing importance of these alternative carbon pools under conditions of limited photosynthesis. Feeding [1,2-13C]Glc and [3-13C]Glc to leaves via the xylem suggested that alternative carbon sources are probably derived from cytosolic pyruvate/phosphoenolpyruvate equivalents and incorporated into isoprene according to the predicted cleavage of the 3-C position of pyruvate during the initial step of the plastidic deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate pathway.
[Tani2004] Tani, A., S. Hayward, A. Hansel, and N. C Hewitt, "Effect of water vapour pressure on monoterpene measurements using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 161–169, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003495
Abstract
The effects of water vapour pressure (WVP) on the fragmentation of seven monoterpene and related C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the drift tube of a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were investigated. In addition, the combined effects of varying WVP and the ratios of electric field strength to number density of the buffer gas (E/N) were investigated in detail for three of these compounds, the monoterpenes α-pinene and sabinene plus the related C10 VOC p-cymene. Under normal operating conditions (E/N = 124 Td), WVP affected the fragment patterns of all compounds with the exception of β-pinene and the three oxygenated C10 VOCs. WVP had a significant effect on the fragment patterns of α-pinene and sabinene at the lower E/N ratios (around 80 Td) but had little effect on fragmentation towards the higher E/N ratios used here (∼142 Td). On the other hand, p-cymene fragmentation was most affected by WVP under normal operating conditions. PTR-MS sensitivity towards the three compounds was also considered under three conditions where reaction was assumed with (1) H3O+ only; (2) H3O+ and H3O+H2O; and (3) H3O+, H3O+H2O and H3O+(H2O)2. Our results indicate that α-pinene and sabinene react not only with H3O+ and H3O+H2O via direct proton transfer but also with H3O+(H2O)2 via ligand switching. p-Cymene seems to react only with H3O+ via direct proton transfer and with H3O+H2O via ligand switching. It is speculated that the WVP effect on fragmentation results from the differing abundances of hydrated reagent ions which causes different frequencies of individual reactions to occur, thus, determining how ‘soft’ the overall reaction is. These results also indicate that under normal conditions, a correction should be made for WVP if the concentration of p-cymene in air samples is to be determined from the single ion signal of either protonated molecular ions or the most dominant fragment ions.
[Hansel2004] Hansel, A., "Proton transfer mass spectrometer", europhysics news, vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 197–199, 2004.
Link: http://www.europhysicsnews.org/articles/epn/pdf/2004/06/epn04606.pdf
[Graus2004] Graus, M., JÖRG-PETER. SCHNITZLER, A. Hansel, C. Cojocariu, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and J. Kreuzwieser, "Transient release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds during light-dark transitions in grey poplar leaves", Plant Physiology, vol. 135, no. 4: American Society of Plant Biologists, pp. 1967–1975, 2004.
Link: http://www.plantphysiology.org/content/135/4/1967.short
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the prompt release of acetaldehyde and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from leaves of Grey poplar [Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith] following light-dark transitions. Mass scans utilizing the extremely fast and sensitive proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry technique revealed the following temporal pattern after light-dark transitions: hexenal was emitted first, followed by acetaldehyde and other C6-VOCs. Under anoxic conditions, acetaldehyde was the only compound released after switching off the light. This clearly indicated that hexenal and other C6-VOCs were released from the lipoxygenase reaction taking place during light-dark transitions under aerobic conditions. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors that artificially increased cytosolic pyruvate demonstrated that the acetaldehyde burst after light-dark transition could not be explained by the recently suggested pyruvate overflow mechanism. The simulation of light fleck situations in the canopy by exposing leaves to alternating light-dark and dark-light transitions or fast changes from high to low photosynthetic photon flux density showed that this process is of minor importance for acetaldehyde emission into the Earth's atmosphere.
2003
[Karl2003b] Karl, T., A. Hansel, T. Märk, W. Lindinger, and D. Hoffmann, "Trace gas monitoring at the Mauna Loa Baseline observatory using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 223: Elsevier, pp. 527–538, 2003.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380602008746
Abstract
Real time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer was performed at the Mauna Loa Baseline Station (19.54N, 155.58W) in March/April 2001 (March 23, 2001–April 17, 2001). Mixing ratios for methanol, acetone, acetonitrile, isoprene and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) plus methacrolein (MACR) ranged between 0.2 and 1.8, 0.2 and 1, 0.07 and 0.2, <0.02 and 0.3, and <0.02 and 0.5 ppbv, respectively. Biomass burning plumes transported from South-East Asia and the Indian Subcontinent across the Pacific influenced part of the measurement campaign. ΔAcetonitrile/ΔCO and Δacetone/Δacetonitrile ratios in these cases were 1.5×10−3 to 2.5×10−3 and 2–5 ppbv/ppbv, respectively. Overall Asian outflow events were not as frequent during Spring 2001 as in previous years. Methanol did not show significant correlation with CO, acetonitrile, and acetone. The abundance of acetone and CO seemed to be influenced but not dominated by biomass burning and domestic biofuel emissions.
2002
[Wisthaler2002] Wisthaler, A., A. Hansel, R. R. Dickerson, and P. J. Crutzen, "Organic trace gas measurements by PTR-MS during INDOEX 1999", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 107, no. D19: American Geophysical Union, pp. 8024, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000576/abstract
Abstract
A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used for fast-response measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during leg 2 (4 March–23 March) of the INDOEX 1999 cruise. In this paper, we present a first overview of the distribution of acetonitrile, methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde over a broad spatial extent of the Indian Ocean (19°N–13°S, 67°E–75°E). The prevailing atmospheric circulation during the winter monsoon transported polluted air from India and the Middle East over the Indian Ocean to meet pristine southern hemispheric air at the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). The chemical composition of air parcels changed according to their geographic origin, which was traced by backtrajectory analysis. The relative abundance of acetonitrile, a selective tracer for biomass burning, to that of carbon monoxide, a general tracer for incomplete combustion, reflected the signature of biomass burning or fossil fuel combustion. This indicated a strong biomass burning impact in W-India, mixed pollution sources in NE-India, and the dominance of fossil fuel combustion in the Middle East. Biomass burning impacted air was rich in methanol (0.70–1.60 ppbv), while acetone (0.80–2.40 ppbv) and acetaldehyde (0.25–0.50 ppbv) were elevated in all continental air masses. Pollution levels decreased toward the ITCZ resulting in minima for methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde of 0.50, 0.45, and 0.12 ppbv, respectively. The observed abundances suggest that there are unidentified sources of acetone and acetaldehyde in biomass burning impacted air masses and in remote marine air.
[Kreuzwieser2002] Kreuzwieser, J., M. Graus, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, H. Rennenberg, and JÖRG-PETER. SCHNITZLER, "Xylem-transported glucose as an additional carbon source for leaf isoprene formation in Quercus robur", New Phytologist, vol. 156, no. 2: Wiley Online Library, pp. 171–178, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1469-8137.2002.00516.x/full
Abstract
In order to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates are a potential source for isoprene biosynthesis, [U- 13 C]-labelled α- d -glucose was fed via cut ends of stems into the xylem of Quercus robur seedlings and the incorporation of 13 C into isoprene emitted was studied. Emission of 13 C-labelled isoprene was monitored in real time by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of 13 C from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) 13 C-labelled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approx. 5–10 min. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% 13 C of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40–42°C), when net assimilation was strongly reduced.   Fast dark-to-light transitions led to a strong single or double 13 C-labelling of isoprene from xylem-fed [U-13C]glucose. During a period of 10–15 min up to 86% of all isoprene molecules became single or double 13 C-labelled, resulting in a 13 C-portion of up to 27% of total carbon emitted as isoprene.   The results provide evidence that xylem-transported glucose or its degradation products can potentially be used as additional precursors for isoprene biosynthesis and that this carbon source becomes more important under conditions of limited photosynthesis.
2001
[Sprung2001] Sprung, D., C. Jost, T. Reiner, A. Hansel, and A. Wisthaler, "Acetone and acetonitrile in the tropical Indian Ocean boundary layer and free troposphere: Aircraft-based intercomparison of AP-CIMS and PTR-MS measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D22: Wiley Online Library, pp. 28511–28527, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000JD900599/full
[Holzinger2001a] Holzinger, R., A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Automobile emissions of acetonitrile: Assessment of its contribution to the global source", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 187–193, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/g3rn0j32865r9220.pdf
[Holzinger2001] Holzinger, R., A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Methanol measurements in the lower troposphere near Innsbruck (047° 16 N; 011° 24 E), Austria", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 14: Elsevier, pp. 2525–2532, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231000004301
2000
[Hansel2000] Hansel, A., and A. Wisthaler, "A method for real-time detection of PAN, PPN and MPAN in ambient air", Geophysical research letters, vol. 27, no. 6: Wiley Online Library, pp. 895–898, 2000.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/1999GL010989/full
1999
[Warneke1999] Warneke, C., T. Karl, H. Judmaier, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, and P. J. Crutzen, "Acetone, methanol, and other partially oxidized volatile organic emissions from dead plant matter by abiological processes: Significance for atmospheric HOx chemistry", Global Biogeochem. Cycles, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 9–17, 1999.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/98GB02428/full
[Holzinger1999] Holzinger, R., C. Warneke, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, D. H. Scharffe, G. Schade, and P. J. Crutzen, "Biomass burning as a source of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, acetonitrile, and hydrogen cyanide", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 26, no. 8: Wiley Online Library, pp. 1161–1164, 1999.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/1999GL900156/full
[Fall1999] Fall, R., T. Karl, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, and W. Lindinger, "Volatile organic compounds emitted after leaf wounding: on-line analysis by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry", Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 104, no. D13: American Geophysical Union, pp. 15963–15, 1999.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/1999/1999JD900144.shtml
Abstract
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from vegetation, including wound-induced VOCs, can have important effects on atmospheric chemistry. The analytical methods for measuring wound-induced VOCs, especially the hexenal family of VOCs (hexenals, hexenols, and hexenyl esters), are complicated by their chemical instability and the transient nature of their formation after leaf and stem wounding. Here we demonstrate that formation and emission of hexenal family compounds can be monitored on-line using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), avoiding the need for preconcentration or chromatography. These measurements allow direct analysis of the rapid emission of the parent compound, (Z)-3-hexenal, within 1–2 s of wounding of aspen leaves and then its disappearance and the appearance of its metabolites including (E)-2-hexenal, hexenols, and hexenyl acetates. Similar results were seen in wounded beech leaves and clover. The emission of hexenal family compounds was proportional to the extent of wounding, was not dependent on light, occurred in attached or detached leaves, and was greatly enhanced as detached leaves dried out. Emission of (Z)-3-hexenal from detached drying aspen leaves averaged 500 μg C g−1 (dry leaf weight). Leaf wound compounds were not emitted in a nitrogen atmosphere but were released within seconds of reintroduction of oxygen; this indicates that there are not large pools of hexenyl compounds in leaves. The PTR-MS method also allows the simultaneous detection of less abundant hexanal family VOCs including hexanal, hexanol, and hexyl acetate and VOCs formed in the light (isoprene) or during anoxia (acetaldehyde). PTR-MS may be a useful tool for the analysis of VOC emissions resulting from grazing, herbivory, and other physical damage to vegetation, from harvesting of crops, and from senescing leaves.
1997
[Jordan1997] Jordan, A., A. Hansel, C. WARNECKE, R. Holzinger, P. Prazeller, W. Vogel, and W. Lindinger, ""On-line" Spurengasanalyse im ppt-Bereich und ihre Anwendungen auf Gebieten der Medizin, Lebensmittelforschung und Luftqualität", , no. 84: Ber. nat-.med. Verein Innsbruck, pp. 7-17, 1997.
Link: http://www.landesmuseum.at/pdf_frei_remote/BERI_84_0007-0017.pdf
1996
[Taucher1996] Taucher, J., A. Hansel, A. Jordan, and W. Lindinger, "Analysis of compounds in human breath after ingestion of garlic using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry", Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, vol. 44, no. 12: ACS Publications, pp. 3778–3782, 1996.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf960640e
Abstract
After ingestion of raw garlic, the components allyl methyl sulfide (1), allyl methyl disulfide (2), diallyl sulfide (3), diallyl disulfide (4), diallyl trisulfide (7), dimethyl sulfide (8), and acetone (9) in the breath of a test person were analyzed over a time period of about 30 h by means of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. While the concentrations of 2−7 reached maxima shortly after ingestion of garlic and declined to baseline values within the next 2−3 h, concentrations of 1, 8, and 9 increased much more slowly and showed enhanced values even 30 h after garlic consumption. The strong increase of the concentration of acetone might be indicative of enhanced metabolism of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and total lipids in the blood stream.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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