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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 5 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Jordan, A.  [Clear All Filters]
2014
[1544] Mueller, M.., T.. Mikoviny, S.. Feil, S.. Haidacher, G.. Hanel, E.. Hartungen, A.. Jordan, L.. Maerk, P.. Mutschlechner, R.. Schottkowsky, et al., "A compact PTR-ToF-MS instrument for airborne measurements of VOCs at high spatio-temporal resolution", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions, vol. 7, pp. 5533–5558, 2014.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech-discuss.net/7/5533/2014/
Abstract
<p><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Herein, we report on the development of a compact proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer for airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The new instrument resolves isobaric ions with a mass resolving power (</span><i style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">m</i><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">/Δ</span><i style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">m</i><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">) of ~ 1000, provides accurate&nbsp;</span><i style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">m/z</i><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&nbsp;measurements (Δ</span><i style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">m</i><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">&nbsp;&lt; 3 mDa), records full mass spectra at 1 Hz and thus overcomes some of the major analytical deficiencies of quadrupole-MS based airborne instruments. 1 Hz detection limits for biogenic VOCs (isoprene, α-pinene), aromatic VOCs (benzene, toluene, xylenes) and ketones (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone) range from 0.05 to 0.12 ppbV, making the instrument well-suited for fast measurements in the continental boundary layer. The instrument detects and quantifies VOCs in locally confined plumes (&lt; 1km) which improves our capability of characterizing emission sources and atmospheric processing within plumes. A deployment during the NASA 2013 DISCOVER-AQ mission generated high vertical and horizontal resolution in situ data of VOCs and ammonia for validation of satellite retrievals and chemistry transport models.</span></p>
2012
[Agarwal2012] Agarwal, B.., S.. Juerschik, P.. Sulzer, F.. Petersson, S.. Jaksch, A.. Jordan, and T.. D. Maerk, "Detection of isocyanates and polychlorinated biphenyls using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 26, no. 8: Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 983–989, Apr, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.6173
Abstract
Isocyanates are highly reactive species widely used in industry. They can cause irritation of the eyes, trigger asthma, etc. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were widely used in electrical equipments like capacitors and transformers in the last century and are still present in the environment today. PCBs are known to cause cancer and to affect the immune, reproductive, nervous and endocrine systems. Therefore, there is a need for a simple, rapid and reliable analytical method for the detection of traces of isocyanates and of PCBs.The data presented in this paper were obtained using a proton transfer reaction (PTR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a high sensitivity PTR quadrupole mass spectrometer. We also utilized a recently developed direct aqueous injection (DAI) inlet system for proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) instruments that allows the analysis of trace compounds in liquids.We detected four isocyanates in the headspace above small sample quantities and investigated their fragmentation pathways to obtain a fundamental understanding of the processes involved in proton transfer reactions and also to determine the best operating conditions of the PTR-MS instruments. In addition, nine PCBs were unambiguously identified via their exact mass and isotopic distribution and detected in different concentration levels via direct injection of the liquid.Utilizing recent developments and improvements in PTR-MS, we can rapidly detect two important environmental pollutant compound classes (isocyanates and PCBs) at high accuracy and without any sample preparation. In this paper, we provide proof of the detection of traces of isocyanates and PCBs in air and also of PCBs in liquids. These results could be used for the development of a real-time monitoring device for industrial waste, polluted air or water quality surveillance.
2011
[Agarwal2011] Agarwal, B.., F.. Petersson, S.. Juerschik, P.. Sulzer, A.. Jordan, T.. D. Maerk, P.. Watts, and C.. A. Mayhew, "Use of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analytical detection of illicit and controlled prescription drugs at room temperature via direct headspace sampling.", Anal Bioanal Chem, vol. 400, no. 8: sitaet Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 2631–2639, Jun, 2011.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-011-4892-8
Abstract
The first reported use of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) for the detection of a range of illicit and prescribed drugs is presented here. We describe the capabilities of PTR-TOF-MS to detect the following commonly used narcotics-ecstasy (N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), morphine, codeine, cocaine and heroin-by the direct sampling of the headspace above small solid quantities (approximately 50 mg) of the drugs placed in glass vials at room temperature, i.e. with no heating of the sample and no pre-concentration. We demonstrate in this paper the ability to identify the drugs, both illicit and prescribed, using PTR-TOF-MS through the accurate m/z assignment of the protonated parent molecule to the second decimal place. We have also included in this study measurements with an impure sample of heroin, containing typical substances found in "street" heroin, to illustrate the use of the technology for more "real-world" samples. Therefore, in a real-world complex chemical environment, a high level of confidence can be placed on the detection of drugs. Although the protonated parent is observed for all drugs, the reactant channel leading to this species is not the only one observed and neither is it necessarily the most dominant. Details on the observed fragmentation behaviour are discussed and compared to electrospray ionisation MS(n) studies available in the literature.
2010
[Juerschik2010a] Juerschik, S.., P.. Sulzer, F.. Petersson, C.. A. Mayhew, A.. Jordan, B.. Agarwal, S.. Haidacher, H.. Seehauser, K.. Becker, and T.. D. Märk, "Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the sensitive and rapid real-time detection of solid high explosives in air and water.", Anal Bioanal Chem, vol. 398, no. 7-8: Ionicon Analytik Gesellschaft m.b.H., Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria. simone.juerschik@ionicon.com, pp. 2813–2820, Dec, 2010.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-010-4114-9
Abstract
Relying on recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), we demonstrate here the capability of detecting solid explosives in air and in water in real time. Two different proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers have been used in this study. One is the PTR-TOF 8000, which has an enhanced mass resolution (m/Δm up to 8,000) and high sensitivity ( 50 cps/ppbv). The second is the high-sensitivity PTR-MS, which has an improved limit of detection of about several hundreds of parts per quadrillion by volume and is coupled with a direct aqueous injection device. These instruments have been successfully used to identify and monitor the solid explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by analysing on the one hand the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces (also demonstrating the usefulness of a simple pre-concentration and thermal desorption technique) and by analysing on the other hand trace compounds in water down to a level of about 100 pptw. The ability to identify even minute amounts of threat compounds, such as explosives, particularly within a complex chemical environment, is vital to the fight against crime and terrorism and is of paramount importance for the appraisal of the fate and harmful effects of TNT at marine ammunition dumping sites and the detection of buried antipersonnel and antitank landmines.
1997
[Taucher1997] Taucher, J.., A.. Hansel, A.. Jordan, R.. Fall, J.. H. Futrell, and W.. Lindinger, "Detection of isoprene in expired air from human subjects using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., vol. 11, pp. 1230-4, 1997.
Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9260307
Abstract
A new analytical method using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTRMS) is described for the determination of trace constituents in human breath. PTRMS is sufficiently sensitive and specific that it does not require preconcentration or separation. At its present stage of development it is capable of detecting trace constituents present in air at the part-per-billion level. These capabilities are illustrated for isoprene, one of the most abundant endogenous hydrocarbons. Our results confirm recent observations of a diurnal level variation associated with sleep or wakefulness; a new finding is that young children have much lower levels of isoprene in breath than adults. To address the metabolic origin of human isoprene, we used PTRMS to analyze expired air for allylic C5 alcohols that have been proposed to be non-enzymatic precursors of isoprene. The lack of correlation between peak breath isoprene and these alcohols suggests that the hydrocarbon is formed by some other mechanism.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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