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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 83 results
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2004
[Graus2004] Graus, M., JÖRG-PETER. SCHNITZLER, A. Hansel, C. Cojocariu, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and J. Kreuzwieser, "Transient release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds during light-dark transitions in grey poplar leaves", Plant Physiology, vol. 135, no. 4: American Society of Plant Biologists, pp. 1967–1975, 2004.
Link: http://www.plantphysiology.org/content/135/4/1967.short
Abstract
In this study, we investigated the prompt release of acetaldehyde and other oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from leaves of Grey poplar [Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith] following light-dark transitions. Mass scans utilizing the extremely fast and sensitive proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry technique revealed the following temporal pattern after light-dark transitions: hexenal was emitted first, followed by acetaldehyde and other C6-VOCs. Under anoxic conditions, acetaldehyde was the only compound released after switching off the light. This clearly indicated that hexenal and other C6-VOCs were released from the lipoxygenase reaction taking place during light-dark transitions under aerobic conditions. Experiments with enzyme inhibitors that artificially increased cytosolic pyruvate demonstrated that the acetaldehyde burst after light-dark transition could not be explained by the recently suggested pyruvate overflow mechanism. The simulation of light fleck situations in the canopy by exposing leaves to alternating light-dark and dark-light transitions or fast changes from high to low photosynthetic photon flux density showed that this process is of minor importance for acetaldehyde emission into the Earth's atmosphere.
2003
[Karl2003c] Karl, T., A. Guenther, C. Spirig, A. Hansel, and R. Fall, "Seasonal variation of biogenic VOC emissions above a mixed hardwood forest in northern Michigan", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 30, no. 23: Wiley Online Library, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2003GL018432/full
Abstract
Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at a hardwood forest in northern Michigan (UMBS, Prophet research site) over the course of the growing and senescing season. Methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and isoprene were found to be the most abundant biogenic VOCs with maximum fluxes (mixing ratios in ppbv) of 2.0 mg m−2 h−1 (21.0), 1.0 mg m−2 h−1 (2.7), 1.6 mg m−2 h−1 (5.6) and 7.6 mg m−2 h−1 (6), respectively. The emission patterns show distinct seasonal changes and indicate a spring peak for methanol due to rapid leaf expansion and a fall peak for acetone and acetaldehyde most likely attributed to senescing and decaying biomass; isoprene emissions peaked as expected in the summer. We estimate potential source strengths of 8.9 Tg (C) y−1 methanol, 2.7 Tg (C) y−1 acetaldehyde and 7.0 Tg (C) y−1 acetone for deciduous temperate forests, which is a substantial contribution to the global atmospheric VOC budget.
[Graus2003] Graus, M., J. Kreuzwieser, J. Schnitzler, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, and H. Rennenberg, "Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.", EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, vol. 1, pp. 10692, 2003.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....10692G
Abstract
Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40 - 42°C) when net assimilation was strongly reduced. Fast dark-to-light transitions led to a strong single or double C-13 labeling of isoprene from xylem-fed [U-C-13] glucose. During a time period of 10 - 15 minutes up to 86% of all isoprene molecules became single or double C-13 labeled, resulting in a C-13 portion of up to 30% of total carbon emitted as isoprene. The results provide potential evidence that xylem-transported glucose or its degradation products can be used as additional precursors for isoprene biosynthesis and this carbon source becomes more important under conditions of limited photosynthesis.
2002
[Warneke2002] Warneke, C., SL. Luxembourg, JA. De Gouw, HJI. Rinne, AB. Guenther, and R. Fall, "Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of oxygenated volatile organic compounds fluxes from an alfalfa field before and after cutting", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 107, no. D8: American Geophysical Union, pp. 4067, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000594/abstract
Abstract
[1] There is interest in and significant uncertainty about the emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (oxVOCs) from vegetation to the atmosphere. Here, we measured the fluxes of selected oxVOCs from an alfalfa field, before, during, and after cutting, using a combination of disjunct eddy covariance and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. Over the course of 1 day a significant methanol flux of 4 mg m−2 h−1 was observed from undisturbed alfalfa with a maximum at 0800 LT, possibly caused by the evaporation of dew. A smaller release of hexenals during this day (0.04 mg m−2 h−1) demonstrated the sensitivity of the method. Other results suggested that acetaldehyde and acetone were released in the afternoon but were lost by dry deposition in the evening and morning; deposition velocities were estimated to be 0.2 cm s−1 (acetaldehyde) and 0.09 cm s−1 (acetone). After the alfalfa was cut the emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and hexenals were significantly enhanced and remained high for three days during which the alfalfa was drying. After a rainstorm the oxVOC emissions from the cut, wet alfalfa increased even more. Nighttime measurements yielded low oxVOC fluxes in general, but the high variability of the concentrations during the night and the high degree of correlation between different oxVOCs suggest that the nighttime releases of oxVOCs from alfalfa were nonzero. This work suggests that the global source of oxVOCs due to the production of hay is of minor importance. The emission flux of methanol from vegetation during the growing season may be very large on a global basis.
[Karl2002] Karl, TG., C. Spirig, J. Rinne, C. Stroud, P. Prevost, J. Greenberg, R. Fall, and A. Guenther, "Virtual disjunct eddy covariance measurements of organic compound fluxes from a subalpine forest using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 2, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 279–291, 2002.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/2/279/
Abstract
A `virtual' disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) device was tested with field measurements of biogenic VOC fluxes at a subalpine forest site in the Rocky Mountains of the USA. A PTR-MS instrument was used as the VOC sensor. Daily peak emission fluxes of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde were around 1.5, 1, 0.8 and 0.4 mg m-2 h-1, respectively. High pass filtering due to long sampling lines was investigated in laboratory experiments, and suggested that VOC losses in PTFA lines are generally governed by diffusion laws. Memory effects and surface reactions did not seem to play a dominant role. Model estimates of MBO fluxes compared well with measured fluxes. The results also suggest that latent heat and sensible heat fluxes are reasonably well correlated with VOC fluxes and could be used to predict variations in VOC emissions. The release of MBO, methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde resulted in significant change of tropospheric oxidant levels and a 10–40% increase in ozone levels, as inferred from a photochemical box model. We conclude that vDEC with a PTR-MS instrument is a versatile tool for simultaneous field analysis of multiple VOC fluxes.
2001
[Rinne2001] Rinne, HJI., AB. Guenther, C. Warneke, JA. De Gouw, and SL. Luxembourg, "Disjunct eddy covariance technique for trace gas flux measurements", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 16, pp. 3139–3142, 2001.
Link: http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0116/2001GL012900/pdf/2001GL012900.pdf
[Karl2001a] Karl, T., A. Guenther, A. Jordan, R. Fall, and W. Lindinger, "Eddy covariance measurement of biogenic oxygenated VOC emissions from hay harvesting", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 491–495, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231000004052
Abstract
Biogenic oxygenated volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes have been directly measured by eddy covariance using the combination of a fast response, real-time \{VOC\} sensor and an acoustic anemometer. \{VOC\} detection is based on proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry which has currently a response time of ca. 0.8 s and the system is suitable for making nearly unattended, long-term and continuous measurements of \{VOC\} fluxes. The eddy covariance system has a detection limit, for most VOCs, of less than 0.1 mg m−2 h−1. The system was field tested above a hayfield near St. Johann, Austria where cut and drying grasses released a variety of VOCs. High fluxes were observed for about 2 days after cutting and were dominated by methanol (1–8.4 mg m−2 h−1), acetaldehyde (0.5–3 mg m−2 h−1), hexenals (0.1–1.5 mg m−2 h−1) and acetone (0.1–1.5 mg m−2 h−1). The eddy covariance measurements generally agreed with flux estimates based on enclosure measurements and surface layer gradients. The sensitivity and selectivity of the system make it suitable for quantifying the fluxes of the dominant biogenic \{VOCs\} from a variety of landscapes and sources.
1995
[Guenther1995] Guenther, A., N. C Hewitt, D. Erickson, R. Fall, C. Geron, T. Graedel, P. Harley, L. Klinger, M. Lerdau, WA. McKay, et al., "A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions", Journal of Geophysical research, vol. 100, no. D5: American Geophysical Union, pp. 8873–8892, 1995.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/1995/94JD02950.shtml
Abstract
Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10–20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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