Callback Service

Undefined

The world's leading PTR-MS company

Providing ultra-sensitive solutions for real-time trace gas analysis since 1998

Navigation

You are here

Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

Welcome to the new IONICON scientific articles database!

Publications

Found 8 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Buettner, Andrea  [Clear All Filters]
2014
[1603] Beauchamp, J., M. Scheibe, T. Hummel, and A. Buettner, "Intranasal odorant concentrations in relation to sniff behavior.", Chem Biodivers, vol. 11, pp. 619–638, Apr, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cbdv.201300320
Abstract
<p>Knowledge on how odorants are transported through the nasal cavity to the olfactory epithelium is limited. One facet of this is how the sniffing behavior affects the abundance of odorants transferred to the olfactory cleft and in turn influences odor perception. A novel system that couples an online mass spectrometer with an odorant pulse delivery olfactometer was employed to characterize intranasal odorant concentrations of butane-2,3-dione (or butanedione, commonly known as diacetyl) at the interior naris and the olfactory cleft. Volunteers (n=12) were asked to perform different modes of sniffing in relation to the sniff intensity that were categorized as &#39;normal&#39;, &#39;rapid&#39; and &#39;forced&#39;. The highest concentrations of butanedione at both positions in the nose were observed during normal sniffing, with the lowest concentrations correlating with periods of forced sniffs. This corresponded to the panelists&#39; ratings that normal sniffing elicited the highest odor intensities. These feasibility assessments pave the way for more in-depth analyses with a variety of odorants of different chemical classes at various intranasal positions, to investigate the passage and uptake of odorants within the nasal cavity.</p>
[1606] Denzer, M. Y., S. Gailer, D. W. Kern, P. L Schumm, N. Thuerauf, J. Kornhuber, A. Buettner, and J. Beauchamp, "Quantitative Validation of the n-Butanol Sniffin' Sticks Threshold Pens.", Chemosens Percept, vol. 7, pp. 91–101, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9168-1
Abstract
<p>Odorant pens are used by medical practitioners and researchers to assess olfactory dysfunction. Despite their routine use, there are currently no data on the gas-phase odorant concentrations released from the pen tips or whether these concentrations scale linearly with the aqueous-phase concentrations inside the pens. The commercially available Sniffin&#39; Sticks odor threshold test containing n-butanol was chosen for evaluation. The gas-phase concentration of n-butanol at the tip of each pen was measured directly in a new set of pens via proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Measurements were additionally made on the same pens after 6&nbsp;months and two older pen sets, namely a 3-year-old (used) and 4-year-old (new) set. Furthermore, application-related tests were made to determine the performance of the pens during routine use and under stress. These data demonstrate that the gas-phase n-butanol concentrations of the threshold pens are linear over the entire set, both for brand-new pens and 6&nbsp;months later; this reflects the expected performance that was previously only assumed. Furthermore, the application-simulation tests demonstrated a good performance of the pens when used according to their intended protocol. Measurements of the older pen sets suggest that storage conditions are more critical than usage for pen stability. The present findings confirm that the n-butanol odorant pens are an appropriate tool for threshold testing, provided they are stored and handled correctly.</p>
2012
[Kirsch2012] Kirsch, F., J. Beauchamp, and A. Buettner, "Time-dependent aroma changes in breast milk after oral intake of a pharmacological preparation containing 1,8-cineole.", Clin Nutr, vol. 31, no. 5: Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Food Chemistry, Emil Fischer Center, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany., pp. 682–692, Oct, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2012.02.002
Abstract
This study investigates time-dependent aroma changes in human milk after intake of an odorant-containing pharmaceutical preparation by correlating sensory evaluation with quantitative results.Human milk donors ingested 100 mg of encapsulated 1,8-cineole. 21 milk samples from 12 participants underwent sensory analysis, of which 14 samples were quantified by stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) analysis. Furthermore, several consecutive breast milk and exhaled breath gas samples from one volunteer after intake of 1,8-cineole were analysed by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and sensory evaluation on three separate days.The emergence of the characteristic eucalyptus-like odour of 1,8-cineole in exhaled breath after capsule ingestion coincided with its transfer into milk; its presence in breath was therefore used to indicate the time at which milk should be expressed for gathering samples. Odorant transfer could not be confirmed by sensory analysis in 7 of the 21 milk samples, most likely due to disadvantageous timing of milk expression. The other 14 samples exhibited a distinct eucalyptus-like odour. Quantitative results matched these observations with <20 ?g/kg 1,8-cineole in the odourless samples and 70 to an estimated 2090 ?g/kg 1,8-cineole in the other samples.Transfer of 1,8-cineole into human milk after oral intake is time dependent and exhibits large inter and intra-individual differences.
2011
[Siefarth2011] Siefarth, C., O. Tyapkova, J. Beauchamp, U. Schweiggert, A. Buettner, and S. Bader, "Influence of polyols and bulking agents on flavour release from low-viscosity solutions", Food Chemistry, vol. 129, no. 4: Elsevier, pp. 1462–1468, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814611008181
Abstract
The release of four volatile flavour compounds (cis-3-hexen-1-ol, benzaldehyde, ethyl butanoate and butyl isovalerate) from pure water and various low-viscosity aqueous solutions (sucrose, maltitol, erythritol, polydextrose and oligofructose, each at 20% (w/w)) was investigated. Dynamic headspace concentrations of the flavour compounds at thermodynamic equilibrium were monitored by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The rheological properties of the solutions were characterised by their viscosity. Flavour release from pure water increased with increasing hydrophobicity and volatility of the flavour compounds. The highly volatile compounds were retained more extensively in the presence of sucrose, polyols and bulking agents, compared to in pure water, whereas an increase in the release of the less volatile cis-3-hexen-1-ol was observed. All aqueous solutions had similar viscosities, although bulking agent solutions tended to have higher viscosities than polyol solutions of the same concentration. A correlation between viscosity and flavour release in the low-viscosity solutions was not evident.
[Siefarth2011a] Siefarth, C., O. Tyapkova, J. Beauchamp, U. Schweiggert, A. Buettner, and S. Bader, "Mixture design approach as a tool to study in vitro flavor release and viscosity interactions in sugar-free polyol and bulking agent solutions", Food Research International, vol. 44, no. 10: Elsevier, pp. 3202–3211, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996911004996
Abstract
Flavor release from mixtures of maltitol, erythritol, polydextrose and oligofructose dissolved in water at concentrations of 43% (w/w) was investigated to analyze possible interactions between the viscous matrix and the volatiles using an experimental mixture design in combination with data analysis and response modeling tools. The dynamic release of four flavor compounds (cis-3-hexenol, benzaldehyde, ethyl butanoate and butyl isovalerate) from the matrices at 37 °C was determined by headspace analyses using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The aim of the present study was to understand the complex release mechanisms from high-viscosity polyol and bulking agent solutions for the intention of conducting further studies on flavor release from sugar-free confectionary products. Each of the non-volatiles had a significant effect (p < 0.05) on flavor release with regression coefficients (R²) between 0.72 and 0.93 for the release parameters Imax, t½, and Δc/Δt, and 0.99 for viscosity. However, the magnitude of influence varied between the bulking agents and polyols due to their different molecular weights. A clear correlation between viscosity of the solutions and flavor release was found, revealing complex matrix-volatile interactions in the high-viscosity solutions. The release of all investigated flavor compounds decreased when the viscosity of the solutions increased. Therefore, it is assumed that the flavor release is significantly influenced by the non-volatiles when a critical concentration (c*) is exceeded. Interactions between the sugar substitutes were found to affect the viscosity of the matrices, whereas flavor release was not affected by interactions between the polyols and bulking agents investigated.
2006
[Mestres2006] Mestres, M., R. Kieffer, and A. Buettner, "Release and perception of ethyl butanoate during and after consumption of whey protein gels: relation between textural and physiological parameters.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 54, no. 5: Facultat d'Enologia, Dept Química Analítica i Orgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain., pp. 1814–1821, Mar, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0517501
Abstract
The influence of gel texture on parameters such as positioning of food material in the oral cavity during mastication, and salivation, and their influence on aroma release in vivo was studied. Retronasal perception was followed by means of time-resolved sensory evaluation, while volatile release patterns were observed by means of PTR-MS. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective sensory perception. Also, gel texture could be clearly correlated with respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo and to the corresponding retronasal aroma perception.
2005
[Mestres2005] Mestres, M., N. Moran, A. Jordan, and A. Buettner, "Aroma release and retronasal perception during and after consumption of flavored whey protein gels with different textures. 1. in vivo release analysis.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 53, no. 2: Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelchemie, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, D-85748 Garching, Germany., pp. 403–409, Jan, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf048596n
Abstract
The influence of gel texture on retronasal aroma release during mastication was followed by means of real-time proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and compared to sensory perception of overall aroma intensity. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo. A modified data analysis approach was used to monitor the aroma changes during the mastication process. It was found that the temporal resolution of the release profile played an important role in adequate description of the release processes. On the basis of this observation, a hypothesis is presented for the observed differences in intensity rating.
2001
[Buettner2001] Buettner, A., A. Beer, C. Hannig, and M. Settles, "Observation of the swallowing process by application of videofluoroscopy and real-time magnetic resonance imaging�consequences for retronasal aroma stimulation", Chemical senses, vol. 26, no. 9: Oxford Univ Press, pp. 1211–1219, 2001.
Link: http://chemse.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/9/1211.short
Abstract
The process of eating and drinking was observed in vivo by application of videofluoroscopy, a dynamic X-ray technique, as well as real-time magnetic resonance imaging. The study was aimed at elucidating the timing and performance of the physiological organs involved in mastication and swallowing, mainly the tongue, the pharynx and the soft palate (velum palatinum). It was shown for the first time that effective physiological barriers do exist during food consumption that are capable of retaining volatiles such as helium within the oral cavity. These barriers allow the access of odorants to the nasal cavity only at certain times during the eating process. Their effectiveness is related to the texture of the food as well as the amount of food material present in the oral cavity and, thereby, directly influences retronasal aroma perception.

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

Download the latest version of the IONICON publication database as BibTeX.