Callback Service

Undefined

The world's leading PTR-MS company

Providing ultra-sensitive solutions for real-time trace gas analysis since 1998

Navigation

You are here

Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

Welcome to the new IONICON scientific articles database!

Publications

Found 767 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
2007
[Norman2007] Norman, M., A. Hansel, and A. Wisthaler, "O2+ as reagent ion in the PTR-MS instrument: Detection of gas-phase ammonia", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 265, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 382–387, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380607002515
Abstract
Oxygen was used as a source gas in a conventional Innsbruck PTR-MS instrument to produce O2+ ions as chemical ionization (CI) reagents instead of H3O+ ions. The use of O2+ ions as CI reagents allows for fast, highly sensitive and specific measurements of gas-phase ammonia (NH3) via the electron transfer reaction O2+ + NH3 → NH3+ + O2. The instrument was tested to be linear in the 2–2000 ppbv range. Instrument sensitivity was observed to be humidity-independent and amounted to ∼40 cps/ppbv. The instrumental background was determined by sampling NH3-free air from a heated platinum/palladium catalyst. A humidity-dependent increase of the instrumental background from 70 pptv at dry conditions to 470 pptv at humid conditions was observed. The corresponding 2σ-detection limits at 1 s signal integration time were 90 pptv for dry conditions and 230 pptv for humid conditions, respectively. The observed background may be intrinsically formed in the instrument's ion source but it may also be the result of incomplete NH3 oxidation in the catalyst used for zeroing. The reported background levels and detection limits are thus to be considered as upper limits. The 1/e response time of the instrument was in the range of 3–5 s. The PTR-MS instrument was successfully deployed in the field to monitor changes in gas-phase NH3 concentrations in the few seconds to tens of seconds time range. Laboratory intercomparison measurements between the PTR-MS instrument and a commercial NH3 analyzer (AiRRmonia) were in good agreement. The use of O2+ ions as CI reagents will significantly improve the analytical capabilities of the Innsbruck PTR-MS instrument.
[Steeghs2007] Steeghs, M. M. L., S.. M. Cristescu, P.. Munnik, P.. Zanen, and F. J. M. Harren, "An off-line breath sampling and analysis method suitable for large screening studies.", Physiol Meas, vol. 28, no. 5: Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands., pp. 503–514, May, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/28/5/005
Abstract
We present a new, off-line breath collection and analysis method, suitable for large screening studies. The breath collection system is based on the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society for the sampling of exhaled NO. Breath containing volatile gases is collected in custom-made black-layered Tedlar bags and analyzed by proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The collection method and data analysis is validated for its accuracy, precision, selectivity, limits of detection, sensitivity and reproducibility. Consecutive fillings of five bags by the same person gave reproducible results to within 12% relative standard deviation (RSD) for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and water content from breath, whereas isoprene was constant to within 30% RSD. In an exploratory small-scale case-control study, we monitor the exhaled breath of 11 lung cancer patients on the day before surgery. The control group consisted of 57 age-matched subjects, the so-called 'healthy smokers'. This study is used as an example of the use of the system presented here.
[Bunge2007] Bunge, M., N. Araghipour, T. Mikoviny, J. Dunkl, A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, F. Schinner, T. D. Maerk, and R. Margesin, "An On-line PTR-MS System for the Sensitive Real-time Detection of Volatile Metabolites from Microbial Cultures", International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, vol. 3, 2007.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_3.pdf
Abstract
AN ON-LINE PTR-MS SYSTEM FOR THE SENSITIVE REAL-TIME DETECTION OF VOLATILE METABOLITES FROM MICROBIAL CULTURES
[Weschler2007] Weschler, C. J., A. Wisthaler, S. Cowlin, G. Tamas, P. Strøm-Tejsen, A. T. Hodgson, H. Destaillats, J. Herrington, J. Zhang, and W. W. Nazaroff, "Ozone-initiated chemistry in an occupied simulated aircraft cabin", Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 41, no. 17: ACS Publications, pp. 6177–6184, 2007.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es0708520
Abstract
We have used multiple analytical methods to characterize the gas-phase products formed when ozone was added to cabin air during simulated 4-hour flights that were conducted in a reconstructed section of a B-767 aircraft containing human occupants. Two separate groups of 16 females were each exposed to four conditions:  low air exchange (4.4 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; low air exchange, 61−64 ppb ozone; high air exchange (8.8 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; and high air exchange, 73−77 ppb ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin air increased the levels of identified byproducts from 70 to 130 ppb at the lower air exchange rate and from 30 to 70 ppb at the higher air exchange rate. Most of the increase was attributable to acetone, nonanal, decanal, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO), formic acid, and acetic acid, with 0.25−0.30 mol of quantified product volatilized per mol of ozone consumed. Several of these compounds reached levels above their reported odor thresholds. Most byproducts were derived from surface reactions with occupants and their clothing, consistent with the inference that occupants were responsible for the removal of >55% of the ozone in the cabin. The observations made in this study have implications for other indoor settings. Whenever human beings and ozone are simultaneously present, one anticipates production of acetone, nonanal, decanal, 6-MHO, geranyl acetone, and 4-OPA.
[Tani2007] Tani, A., S. Kato, Y. Kajii, M. Wilkinson, S. Owen, and N. Hewitt, "A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry based system for determining plant uptake of volatile organic compounds", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 41, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1736–1746, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006010454
Abstract
In order to evaluate the contribution that higher plants make to the removal of volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere, a measurement system consisting of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), CO2 analyzer, diffusion devise and leaf enclosure was established. The uptake of VOCs by Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) was investigated. The overall relative error associated with measurements made using this system was <2.2% when a Golden Pothos leaf was exposed to 75–750 ppbv of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Even at the lowest MIBK concentration, more than 2.2% of the inflowing VOC was lost to the leaf, representing a detectable and positive MIBK uptake rate by the plant. The results of the investigation were compared with a measurement system based on gas chromatography analysis and it was shown that the use of a PTR-MS based system can significantly increase the certainties in determining the rate of VOC uptake by plants.
[Maleknia2007] Maleknia, S. D., T. L. Bell, and M. A. Adams, "PTR-MS analysis of reference and plant-emitted volatile organic compounds", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 262, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 203–210, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380606005380
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was applied to the analysis of a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that emit from various plants. These include a group of alcohols (methanol, ethanol and butanol), carbonyl-containing compounds (acetic acid, acetone and benzaldehyde), isoprene, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran (THF), pyrazine, toluene and xylene and a series of terpenes (p-cymene, camphene, 2-carene, limonene, β-myrcene, α-pinene, β-pinene, γ-tepinene and terpinolene) and oxygen-containing terpenes (1,8-cineole and linalool). These mass spectral data were compared to an electron ionization (EI) database identifying that not all PTR-MS fragments were common to EI. PTR-MS studies of these reference compounds were utilized to identify VOCs emitted from Eucalyptus grandis leaf at a temperature range of 30–100 °C. In addition to protonated molecules (M + H)+, abundant proton-bound dimers or trimers were detected for alcohols, acetone, acetonitrile and THF. Abundant fragment ions attributed to the loss of water from these proton-bound clusters were also observed. The stability of butyl (C4H9+m/z 57) and acetyl (CH3CO+m/z 43) fragment ions directed the proton-transfer reactions of butanol and acetic acid. Abundant (M + H)+ ions were detected for pyrazine, THF, toluene and xylene, as well as for all terpenes except those containing oxygen. For linalool and 1,8-cineole, the loss of water generated an abundant fragment ion at m/z 137. PTR-MS fragmentation patterns for terpenes were proposed for m/z 81 (C6H9+), 93 (C7H9+), 95 (C7H11+), 107 (C8H11+), 109 (C8H13+), 119 (C9H11+), 121 (C9H13+) and 137 (loss of water for oxygen-containing terpenes; C10H17+). The relative abundances of (M + H)+ and fragments for all terpenes (except linalool) were dependent on the drift tube voltage and the optimum voltage for detection of molecular ions was different for various terpenes.
[Wisthaler2007] Wisthaler, A., P. Strøm-Tejsen, L. Fang, T. J. Arnaud, A. Hansel, T. D. Maerk, and D. P. Wyon, "PTR-MS assessment of photocatalytic and sorption-based purification of recirculated cabin air during simulated 7-h flights with high passenger density.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 41, no. 1: Institut fuer Ionenphysik, Leopold-Franzens- Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria. armin.wisthaler@uibk.ac.at, pp. 229–234, Jan, 2007.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es060424e
Abstract
Four different air purification conditions were established in a simulated 3-row 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin: no air purifier; a photocatalytic oxidation unit with an adsorptive prefilter; a second photocatalytic unit with an adsorptive prefilter; and a two-stage sorption-based air filter (gas-phase absorption and adsorption). The air purifiers placed in the cabin air recirculation system were commercial prototypes developed for use in aircraft cabin systems. The four conditions were established in balanced order on 4 successive days of each of 4 successive weeks during simulated 7-h flights with 17 occupants. Proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry was used to assess organic gas-phase pollutants and the performance of each air purifier. The concentration of most organic pollutants present in aircraft cabin air was efficiently reduced by all three units. The photocatalytic units were found to incompletely oxidize ethanol released by the wet wipes commonly supplied with airline mealsto produce unacceptably high levels of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde.
[Spitaler2007] Spitaler, R., N. Araghipour, T. Mikoviny, A. Wisthaler, J. Dalla Via, and T. D. Maerk, "PTR-MS in enology: Advances in analytics and data analysis", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 266, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 1–7, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380607002266
Abstract
The present communication deals with the improvement of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) wine headspace analyses. In contrast to previous PTR-MS investigations of wine, where wine headspace was ionized by protonated ethanol clusters, the headspace was diluted by a factor of 1:40 with N2 and ionized by H3O+ ions. This method is better suited for routine applications than the previously reported method since it is simpler, faster, and the mass spectra obtained are less complex. A test wine was mixed with ethanol and with water to yield ethanol contents ranging from 10 to 15% (v/v) and these mixtures were analyzed to assess whether any quantitative differences in the composition of volatiles were detectable. The data showed no impact of the ethanol content on the wine headspace composition. The new method was applied to eight different wine samples produced from two different grape varieties: Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon. Each variety was grown in two different locations in South Tyrol (Northern Italy) and harvested at two different dates. Quantitative (but not qualitative) differences in PTR-MS spectra between the two wine varieties were observed. Using principal component analysis of selected m/z signals differentiation between Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon samples was achievable.
[Aprea2007] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "PTR-MS study of esters in water and water/ethanol solutions: Fragmentation patterns and partition coefficients", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 262, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 114–121, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380606005240
Abstract
Esters strongly influence the perceived aroma of alcoholic beverages and their rapid monitoring can play an important role in the quality control of these products. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) allows the rapid and non invasive monitoring of foodstuff but there is still a lack of information about the proton transfer induced fragmentation and on the effect of high ethanol concentration. PTR-MS fragmentation patterns of 21 esters are reported, most of them for the first time. For linear methyl and ethyl esters the fragmentation dependence on E/N was also evaluated. Acetate esters, with exception of methyl acetate, show as main peaks the characteristic fragment ions at m/z 61 and m/z 43, whereas propanoate esters, but methyl propanoate, exhibit as main peaks the typical signals at m/z 75 and m/z 57. For all the other esters, here reported, the spectra are dominated by the protonated molecular ion. For methyl and ethyl esters we also report, in many cases for the first time, the water-solution/air partition coefficients (Henry's law constant) and the ethanol-solution/air partition coefficients at different ethanol concentrations. The information provided in this work may be useful as a basis for further studies for the identification and quantification of esters in the headspace of alcoholic beverages extending the application field of PTR-MS.
[Knighton2007] Knighton, W. B., T. M. Rogers, B. E. Anderson, S. C. Herndon, P. E. Yelvington, and R. C. Miake-Lye, "Quantification of aircraft engine hydrocarbon emissions using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Journal of Propulsion and Power, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 949–958, 2007.
Link: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/1.22965
[Bouvier-Brown2007] Bouvier-Brown, N. C., R. Holzinger, K. Palitzsch, and A. H. Goldstein, "Quantifying sesquiterpene and oxygenated terpene emissions from live vegetation using solid-phase microextraction fibers.", J Chromatogr A, vol. 1161, no. 1-2: University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. nbouvier@nature.berkeley.edu, pp. 113–120, Aug, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2007.05.094
Abstract
Biogenic terpenes play important roles in ecosystem functioning and atmospheric chemistry. Some of these compounds are semi-volatile and highly reactive, such as sesquiterpenes and oxygenated terpenes, and are thus difficult to quantify using traditional air sampling and analysis methods. We developed an alternative approach to quantify emissions from live branches using a flow through enclosure and sample collection on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. This method allows for collection and analysis of analytes with minimal sample transfer through tubing to reduce the potential for losses. We characterized performance characteristics for 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibers using gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry and optimized experimental conditions and procedures for field collections followed by laboratory analysis. Using 10-45 min sampling times and linear calibration curves created from mixtures of terpenes, emissions of methyl chavicol, an oxygenated terpene, and an array of sesquiterpenes were quantified from a Ponderosa pine branch. The detection limit was 4.36 pmol/mol (ppt) for methyl chavicol and 16.6 ppt for beta-caryophyllene. Concentrations determined with SPME fibers agreed with measurements made using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) within the estimated error of the method for well calibrated compounds. This technique can be applied for quantification of biogenic oxygenated terpene and sesquiterpene emissions from live branches in the field.
[Granitto2007] Granitto, P. M., F. Biasioli, E. Aprea, D. Mott, C. Furlanello, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Rapid and non-destructive identification of strawberry cultivars by direct PTR-MS headspace analysis and data mining techniques", Sensors and actuators B: Chemical, vol. 121, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 379–385, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925400506002577
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a spectrometric technique that allows direct injection and analysis of mixtures of volatile compounds. Its coupling with data mining techniques provides a reliable and fast method for the automatic characterization of agroindustrial products. We test the validity of this approach to identify samples of strawberry cultivars by measurements of single intact fruits. The samples used were collected over 3 years and harvested in different locations. Three data mining techniques (random forests, penalized discriminant analysis and discriminant partial least squares) have been applied to the full PTR-MS spectra without any preliminary projection or feature selection. We tested the classification models in three different ways (leave-one-out and leave-group-out internal cross validation, and leaving a full year aside), thereby demonstrating that strawberry cultivars can be identified by rapid non-destructive measurements of single fruits. Performances of the different classification methods are compared.
[Aprea2007b] Aprea, E., F. Biasioli, S. Carlin, G. Versini, T. D. Maerk, and F. Gasperi, "Rapid white truffle headspace analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and comparison with solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 21, no. 16: IASMA Research Center, Agri-Food Quality Department, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige (TN), Italy. eugenio.aprea@iasma.it, pp. 2564–2572, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.3118
Abstract
The gastronomic relevance and high price of white truffle are related mainly to its unique aroma. Here we evaluate, for the first time, the possibility of characterizing in a rapid and non-destructive way the aroma of white truffles based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We indicate that anonymous PTR-MS fingerprinting allows sample classification and we also compare qualitatively and quantitatively PTR-MS data with measurements made by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC) of the same samples under the same conditions. PTR-MS fragmentation data of truffle-relevant compounds are also published here for the first time. Most of the sulfur-containing compounds detected by GC and relevant for white truffle aroma have a high positive correlation with single PTR-MS peaks. Our work indicates that, after preliminary comparison with GC data, PTR-MS is a new tool for the rapid, quantitative and non-invasive characterization of white truffle by direct headspace injection without any pre-concentration.
[Mateus2007] Mateus, M-L.., C. Lindinger, J-C.. Gumy, and R. Liardon, "Release kinetics of volatile organic compounds from roasted and ground coffee: online measurements by PTR-MS and mathematical modeling.", J Agric Food Chem, vol. 55, no. 25: Nestlé Product Technology Center, CH-1350 Orbe, Switzerland. ml_mateus@hotmail.com, pp. 10117–10128, Dec, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf071901v
Abstract
The present work shows the possibilities and limitations in modeling release kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from roasted and ground coffee by applying physical and empirical models such as the diffusion and Weibull models. The release kinetics of VOCs were measured online by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Compounds were identified by GC-MS, and the contribution of the individual compounds to different mass fragments was elucidated by GC/PTR-MS. Coffee samples roasted to different roasting degrees and ground to different particle sizes were studied under dry and wet stripping conditions. To investigate the accuracy of modeling the VOC release kinetics recorded using PTR-MS, online kinetics were compared with kinetics reconstituted from purge and trap samplings. Results showed that uncertainties in ion intensities due to the presence of isobaric species may prevent the development of a robust mathematical model. Of the 20 identified compounds, 5 were affected to a lower extent as their contribution to specific m/z intensity varied by <15% over the stripping time. The kinetics of these compounds were fitted using physical and statistical models, respectively, the diffusion and Weibull models, which helped to identify the underlying release mechanisms. For dry stripping, the diffusion model allowed a good representation of the release kinetics, whereas for wet stripping conditions, release patterns were very complex and almost specific for each compound analyzed. In the case of prewetted coffee, varying particle size (approximately 400-1200 microm) had no significant effect on the VOC release rate, whereas for dry coffee, the release was faster for smaller particles. The absence of particle size effect in wet coffee was attributed to the increase of opened porosity and compound diffusivity by solubilization and matrix relaxation. To conclude, the accurate modeling of VOC release kinetics from coffee allowed small variations in compound release to be discriminated. Furthermore, it evidenced the different aroma compositions that may be obtained depending on the time when VOCs are recovered.
[Steeghs2007a] Steeghs, M. M. L., S. M. Cristescu, and F. J. M. Harren, "The suitability of Tedlar bags for breath sampling in medical diagnostic research", Physiological Measurement, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 73, 2007.
Link: http://stacks.iop.org/0967-3334/28/i=1/a=007
Abstract
Tedlar bags are tested for their suitability for breath sampling for medical diagnostic purposes. Proton-transfer reaction-mass spectrometry was used to monitor the changes in composition of various mixtures contained in custom-made black-layered Tedlar bags. Characteristic ions at m / z 88 and 95 amu reflect considerable pollution from the bag material. The pollutant found on m / z 88 amu is most probably N , N -dimethylacetamide, a latent solvent used in the production of Tedlar film. Gas composition losses during filling were found to range from 5 to 47%, depending on the compound. Once stored, the half-lives of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene, benzene, toluene and styrene were estimated between 5 and 13 days. Losses from breath samples (52 h after filling) were found to be less than 10%. No observable decrease was found for ethylene over 3 days, using laser-based photoacoustic detection. For the use of Tedlar bags, a standardized protocol is advised, where the time point of analysis is fixed for all samples and should be kept as close as possible to the time of sampling.
[1488] Karl, T., A. Guenther, R. J. Yokelson, J. Greenberg, M. Potosnak, D. R. Blake, and P. Artaxo, "The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: Emission, chemistry, and transport of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the lower atmosphere over Amazonia", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 112, pp. n/a–n/a, 2007.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2007JD008539
Abstract
<p>Airborne and ground-based mixing ratio and flux measurements using eddy covariance (EC) and for the first time the mixed layer gradient (MLG) and mixed layer variance (MLV) techniques are used to assess the impact of isoprene and monoterpene emissions on atmospheric chemistry in the Amazon basin. Average noon isoprene (7.8 &plusmn; 2.3 mg/m2/h) and monoterpene fluxes (1.2 &plusmn; 0.5 mg/m2/h) compared well between ground and airborne measurements and are higher than fluxes estimated in this region during other seasons. The biogenic emission model, Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), estimates fluxes that are within the model and measurement uncertainty and can describe the large observed variations associated with land-use change in the region north-west of Manaus. Isoprene and monoterpenes accounted for &sim;75% of the total OH reactivity in this region and are important volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for modeling atmospheric chemistry in Amazonia. The presence of fair weather clouds (cumulus humilis) had an important impact on the vertical distribution and chemistry of VOCs through the planetary boundary layer (PBL), the cloud layer, and the free troposphere (FT). Entrainment velocities between 10:00 and 11:30 local time (LT) are calculated to be on the order of 8&ndash;10 cm/s. The ratio of methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MAC) (unique oxidation products of isoprene chemistry) with respect to isoprene showed a pronounced increase in the cloud layer due to entrainment and an increased oxidative capacity in broken cloud decks. A decrease of the ratio in the lower free troposphere suggests cloud venting through activated clouds. OH modeled in the planetary boundary layer using a photochemical box model is much lower than OH calculated from a mixed layer budget approach. An ambient reactive sesquiterpene mixing ratio of 1% of isoprene would be sufficient to explain most of this discrepancy. Increased OH production due to increased photolysis in the cloud layer balances the low OH values modeled for the planetary boundary layer. The intensity of segregation (Is) of isoprene and OH, defined as a relative reduction of the reaction rate constant due to incomplete mixing, is found to be significant: up to 39 &plusmn; 7% in the &sim;800-m-deep cloud layer. The effective reaction rate between isoprene and OH can therefore vary significantly in certain parts of the lower atmosphere.</p>
[Karl2007] Karl, TG., TJ. Christian, RJ. Yokelson, P. Artaxo, M. W Hao, and A. Guenther, "The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: method evaluation of volatile organic compound emissions measured by PTR-MS, FTIR, and GC from tropical biomass burning", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 7, no. 22: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 5883–5897, 2007.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/5883/2007/acp-7-5883-2007.html
Abstract
Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from fires in tropical forest fuels were quantified using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to PTRMS (GC-PTR-MS). We investigated VOC emissions from 19 controlled laboratory fires at the USFS (United States Forest Service) Fire Sciences Laboratory and 16 fires during an intensive airborne field campaign during the peak of the burning season in Brazil in 2004. The VOC emissions were dominated by oxygenated VOCs (OVOC) (OVOC/NMHC  4:1, NMHC: non-methane hydrocarbons) The specificity of the PTR-MS instrument, which measures the mass to charge ratio of VOCs ionized by H3O+ ions, was validated by gas chromatography and by intercomparing in-situ measurements with those obtained from an open path FTIR instrument. Emission ratios for methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde, acrylonitrile and pyrrole were measured in the field for the first time. Our measurements show a higher contribution of OVOCs than previously assumed for modeling purposes. Comparison of fresh (<15 min) and aged (>1 h–1 d) smoke suggests altered emission ratios due to gas phase chemistry for acetone but not for acetaldehyde and methanol. Emission ratios for numerous, important, reactive VOCs with respect to acetonitrile (a biomass burning tracer) are presented.
[Shaw2007] Shaw, S. L., F. M. Mitloehner, W. Jackson, E. J. Depeters, J. G. Fadel, P. H. Robinson, R. Holzinger, and A. H. Goldstein, "Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy cows and their waste as measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 41, no. 4: Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, Hilgard Hall, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. slshaw@alum.mit.edu, pp. 1310–1316, Feb, 2007.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es061475e
Abstract
California dairies house approximately 1.8 million lactating and 1.5 million dry cows and heifers. State air regulatory agencies view these dairies as a major air pollutant source, but emissions data are sparse, particularly for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The objective of this work was to determine VOC emissions from lactating and dry dairy cows and their waste using an environmental chamber. Carbon dioxide and methane were measured to provide context for the VOCs. VOCs were measured by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The compounds with highest fluxes when cows plus waste were present were methanol, acetone + propanal, dimethylsulfide, and m/z 109 (likely 4-methyl-phenol). The compounds with highest fluxes from fresh waste (urine and feces) were methanol, m/z 109, and m/z 60 (likely trimethylamine). Ethanol fluxes are reported qualitatively, and several VOCs that were likely emitted (formaldehyde, methylamine, dimethylamine) were not detectable by PTR-MS. The sum of reactive VOC fluxes measured when cows were present was a factor of 6-10 less than estimates historically used for regulatory purposes. In addition, ozone formation potentials of the dominant VOCs were -10% those of typical combustion or biogenic VOCs. Thus dairy cattle have a comparatively small impact on ozone formation per VOC mass emitted.
[Filella2007] Filella, I., M. J. Wilkinson, J. Llusia, N. C Hewitt, and J. Penuelas, "Volatile organic compounds emissions in Norway spruce (Picea abies) in response to temperature changes", Physiologia Plantarum, vol. 130, no. 1: Wiley Online Library, pp. 58–66, 2007.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1399-3054.2007.00881.x/full
Abstract
Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings were monitored in response to a temperature ramp. Online measurements were made with a proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometer under controlled conditions, together with plant physiological variables. Masses corresponding to acetic acid and acetone were the most emitted VOCs. The emission rates of m137 (monoterpenes), m59 (acetone), m33 (methanol), m83 (hexanal, hexenals), m85 (hexanol) and m153 (methyl salicylate, MeSa) increased exponentially with temperature. The emission of m61 (acetic acid) and m45 (acetaldehyde), however, increased with temperature only until saturation around 30°C, closely following the pattern of transpiration rates. These results indicate that algorithms that use only incident irradiance and leaf temperature as drivers to predict VOC emission rates may be inadequate for VOCs with lower H, and consequently higher sensitivity to stomatal conductance.
[Galbally2007] Galbally, I. E., S. J. Lawson, I. A. Weeks, S. T. Bentley, R. W. Gillett, M. Meyer, and A. H. Goldstein, "Volatile organic compounds in marine air at Cape Grim, Australia", Environmental Chemistry, vol. 4, no. 3: CSIRO, pp. 178–182, 2007.
Link: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EN07024
Abstract
Measurements were made of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at Cape Grim using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) during the Precursors to Particles (P2P) Campaign from 10 February to 1 March 2006. Approximately 14 days of clean air data were obtained along with 4 days of data from when polluted air, first from a smoke plume from a fire on Robbins Island adjacent to the station and then air from Victoria, was present. This paper deals with the results obtained in clean air, the focus of the P2P campaign. The protonated masses and probable VOCs measured in the clean marine air were: methanol, 33; acetonitrile, 42; acetaldehyde, 45; acetone, 59; isoprene, 69; methylvinyl ketone/methacrolein (MVK/MACR), 71; methylethyl ketone, 73; and benzene, 79. The measurements at Cape Grim were in some cases near the detection limit and an analytical challenge. The range of concentrations detected in clean maritime air, the relationship to the limited range of previous measurements in marine air in the Northern Hemisphere tropics, and the physical, chemical and biological processes controlling these compounds in the marine air are discussed. The methanol concentrations observed at Cape Grim are consistent with global modelling, incorporating sources that are mainly of vegetation origin. Isoprene has recently been implicated as a precursor to cloud condensation nuclei over the Southern Ocean. In this snapshot of observations at Cape Grim, Tasmania, isoprene and the isoprene oxidation products MVK and MACR appeared to be absent in air from the Southern Ocean. However, isoprene has a very short atmospheric lifetime and the spatial distribution of its emissions may be very heterogeneous. The concentrations of the other VOCs in marine air at Cape Grim, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, acetone, methylethyl ketone and benzene, were typically a factor of four lower than that observed over the remote tropical ocean in the Northern Hemisphere. The lower concentrations of carbonyls and their precursor hydrocarbons may indicate a limitation on ozone production potential in the Southern Hemisphere compared with the Northern Hemisphere troposphere.
2006
[Colomb2006] Colomb, A., J. Williams, J. Crowley, V. Gros, R. Hofmann, G. Salisbury, T. Klüpfel, R. Kormann, A. Stickler, C. Forster, et al., "Airborne measurements of trace organic species in the upper troposphere over Europe: the impact of deep convection", Environmental Chemistry, vol. 3, no. 4: CSIRO, pp. 244–259, 2006.
Link: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EN06020
Abstract
The volume mixing ratios of several organic trace gases and ozone (O3) were measured in the upper troposphere over Europe during the UTOPIHAN-ACT aircraft campaign in July 2003. The organic trace gases included alkanes, isoprene, aromatics, iodomethane, and trichloroethylene, oxygenates such as acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and longer-lived tracer species such as chlorofluorocarbons and halochloroflurocarbons. The aim of the UTOPIHAN-ACT project was to study the chemical impact of deep convection on the continental upper troposphere. A Lear Jet aircraft, based in Germany, was flown at heights between 6 and 13 km in the region 59°N–42°N to 7°W–13°E during July 2003. Overall, the convectively influenced measurements presented here show a weaker variability lifetime dependence of trace gases than similar measurements collected over the Mediterranean region under more stable high-pressure conditions. Several cases of convective outflow are identified by the elevated mixing ratios of organic species relative to quiescent background conditions, with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences detectable in the upper troposphere. Enhancement at higher altitudes, notably of species with relatively short chemical lifetimes such as benzene, toluene, and even isoprene indicates deep convection over short timescales during summertime. The impact of deep convection on the local upper tropospheric formaldehyde and HOx budgets is assessed.
[Mueller2006] Müller, K., S. Haferkorn, W. Grabmer, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, J. Kreuzwieser, C. Cojocariu, H. Rennenberg, and H. Herrmann, "Biogenic carbonyl compounds within and above a coniferous forest in Germany", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 81–91, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003220
Abstract
Diurnal mixing ratios of aldehydes and ketones were investigated during two joint experiments in summer months to identify biogenic contributions from coniferous forests to tropospheric chemistry. In a Norway spruce forest, the diurnal variation of carbonyl compounds was measured at 12 m (in the treetop) and at 24 m (above the canopy). The main findings of the experiment are that acetone (up to 9.1 ppbv), formaldehyde (up to 6.5 ppbv), acetaldehyde (up to 5.5 ppbv) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, up to 1.8 ppbv) were found in highest concentrations. For all major compounds with the exception of MEK, primary emissions are supposed. From α-pinene oxidation, pinonaldehyde was found with its peak concentrations (up to 0.15 ppbv) during the early morning hours. The diurnal variation of concentrations for most other compounds shows maximum concentrations near midday in 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) measurements but not for proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) measurements of acetaldehyde and acetone. A clear correlation of carbonyl compound concentration to the radiation intensity and the temperature (R2=0.66) was found. However, formaldehyde did not show distinct diurnal variations. A very high correlation was observed for both heights between mixing ratios of acetaldehyde and acetone (R2=0.84), acetone and MEK (R2=0.90) as well as acetaldehyde and MEK (R2=0.88) but not for formaldehyde and the others. For the most time, the observed carbonyl compound concentrations above the canopy are higher than within the forest stand. This indicates an additional secondary formation in the atmosphere above the forest. The differences of acetone and acetaldehyde mixing ratios detected by DNPH technique and the PTR-MS could not be fully clarified by a laboratory intercomparison.
[Warneke2006] Warneke, C., JA. De Gouw, A. Stohl, OR. Cooper, PD. Goldan, WC. Kuster, JS. Holloway, EJ. Williams, BM. Lerner, SA. McKeen, et al., "Biomass burning and anthropogenic sources of CO over New England in the summer 2004", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 111, no. D23: American Geophysical Union, pp. D23S15, 2006.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2005JD006878.shtml
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 large wildfires were burning in Alaska and Canada, and part of the emissions were transported toward the northeast United States, where they were measured during the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 (New England Air Quality Study–Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) study on board the NOAA WP-3 aircraft and the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown. Using acetonitrile and chloroform as tracers the biomass burning and the anthropogenic fraction of the carbon monoxide (CO) enhancement are determined. As much as 30% of the measured enhancement is attributed to the forest fires in Alaska and Canada transported into the region, and 70% is attributed to the urban emissions of mainly New York and Boston. On some days the forest fire emissions were mixed down to the surface and dominated the CO enhancement. The results compare well with the FLEXPART transport model, indicating that the total emissions during the measurement campaign for biomass burning might be about 22 Tg. The total U.S. anthropogenic CO sources used in FLEXPART are 25 Tg. FLEXPART model, using the U.S. EPA NEI-99 data, overpredicts the CO mixing ratio around Boston and New York in 2004 by about 50%.
[vonDahl2006] von Dahl}, C. C. {, M. Haevecker, R. Schloegl, and I. T. Baldwin, "Caterpillar-elicited methanol emission: a new signal in plant-herbivore interactions?", Plant J, vol. 46, no. 6: Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Beutenberg Campus, Hans-Knoell-Strasse 8, 07745 Jena, Germany., pp. 948–960, Jun, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2006.02760.x
Abstract
Plants release into the atmosphere large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of which methanol (MeOH), a putative waste product, is the second most abundant. Using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), we demonstrate that when Manduca sexta larvae attack Nicotiana attenuata plants, the wound-induced release of MeOH dramatically increases. The sustained MeOH emission 24 h after herbivore feeding is already substantially greater than the release of the well-characterized green-leaf VOC E-2-hexenal. Herbivore attack and treatment of puncture wounds with larval oral secretions (OS) increased the transcript accumulation and activity of leaf pectin methylesterases (PMEs), and decreased the degree of pectin methylation, as determined by (1)H-NMR; therefore, we propose that the released MeOH originates from the activation of PMEs by herbivore attack. The herbivore- and OS-elicited MeOH results not from the activity of previously characterized elicitors in OS but from a pH shift at the wound site when larval OS (pH 8.5-9.5) are introduced into the wounds during feeding. Applying MeOH to plants in quantities that mimic the herbivory-elicited release decreases the activity of the potent plant defense proteins trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPI), and increases the performance of the attacking larvae. The pH of lepidopteran larvae regurgitants is commonly very high, and the MeOH released during feeding that is elicited by the pH change at the wound site functions as a quantitative signal that influences the outcome of the plant-herbivore interaction.
[Zavala2006] Zavala, M., SC. Herndon, RS. Slott, EJ. Dunlea, LC. Marr, JH. Shorter, M. Zahniser, WB. Knighton, TM. Rogers, CE. Kolb, et al., "Characterization of on-road vehicle emissions in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a mobile laboratory in chase and fleet average measurement modes during the MCMA-2003 field campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 6, no. 12: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 5129–5142, 2006.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/6/5129/2006/acp-6-5129-2006.html
Abstract
A mobile laboratory was used to measure on-road vehicle emission ratios during the MCMA-2003 field campaign held during the spring of 2003 in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The measured emission ratios represent a sample of emissions of in-use vehicles under real world driving conditions for the MCMA. From the relative amounts of NOx and selected VOC's sampled, the results indicate that the technique is capable of differentiating among vehicle categories and fuel type in real world driving conditions. Emission ratios for NOx, NOy, NH3, H2CO, CH3CHO, and other selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are presented for chase sampled vehicles in the form of frequency distributions as well as estimates for the fleet averaged emissions. Our measurements of emission ratios for both CNG and gasoline powered "colectivos" (public transportation buses that are intensively used in the MCMA) indicate that – in a mole per mole basis – have significantly larger NOx and aldehydes emissions ratios as compared to other sampled vehicles in the MCMA. Similarly, ratios of selected VOCs and NOy showed a strong dependence on traffic mode. These results are compared with the vehicle emissions inventory for the MCMA, other vehicle emissions measurements in the MCMA, and measurements of on-road emissions in U.S. cities. We estimate NOx emissions as 100 600±29 200 metric tons per year for light duty gasoline vehicles in the MCMA for 2003. According to these results, annual NOx emissions estimated in the emissions inventory for this category are within the range of our estimated NOx annual emissions. Our estimates for motor vehicle emissions of benzene, toluene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde in the MCMA indicate these species are present in concentrations higher than previously reported. The high motor vehicle aldehyde emissions may have an impact on the photochemistry of urban areas.

Pages

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

Download the latest version of the IONICON publication database as BibTeX.