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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 12 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Märk, Tilmann D.  [Clear All Filters]
2016
[1716] Schuhfried, E., J. {Sánchez Del Pulgar}, M. Bobba, R. Piro, L. Cappellin, T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Classification of 7 monofloral honey varieties by PTR-ToF-MS direct headspace analysis and chemometrics.", Talanta, vol. 147, pp. 213–219, Jan, 2016.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2015.09.062
Abstract
<p>Honey, in particular monofloral varieties, is a valuable commodity. Here, we present proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry, PTR-ToF-MS, coupled to chemometrics as a successful tool in the classification of monofloral honeys, which should serve in fraud protection against mispresentation of the floral origin of honey. We analyzed 7 different honey varieties from citrus, chestnut, sunflower, honeydew, robinia, rhododendron and linden tree, in total 70 different honey samples and a total of 206 measurements. Only subtle differences in the profiles of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of the different honeys could be found. Nevertheless, it was possible to successfully apply 6 different classification methods with a total correct assignment of 81-99% in the internal validation sets. The most successful methods were stepwise linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and probabilistic neural network (PNN), giving total correct assignments in the external validation sets of 100 and 90%, respectively. Clearly, PTR-ToF-MS/chemometrics is a powerful tool in honey classification.</p>
2015
[1638] Lanza, M., J. W Acton, P. Sulzer, K. Breiev, S. Jürschik, A. Jordan, E. Hartungen, G. Hanel, L. Märk, T. D. Märk, et al., "Selective reagent ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry: a rapid technology for the novel analysis of blends of new psychoactive substances.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 50, pp. 427–431, Feb, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3514
Abstract
<p>In this study we demonstrate the potential of selective reagent ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry for the rapid and selective identification of a popular new psychoactive substance blend called &#39;synthacaine&#39;, a mixture that is supposed to imitate the sensory and intoxicating effects of cocaine. Reactions with H3O(+) result in protonated parent molecules which can be tentatively assigned to benzocaine and methiopropamine. However, by comparing the product ion branching ratios obtained at two reduced electric field values (90 and 170 Td) for two reagent ions (H3O(+) and NO(+)) to those of the pure chemicals, we show that identification is possible with a much higher level of confidence then when relying solely on the m/z of protonated parent molecules. A rapid and highly selective analytical identification of the constituents of a recreational drug is particularly crucial to medical personnel for the prompt medical treatment of overdoses, toxic effects or allergic reactions.</p>
2014
[1642] W Acton, J., M. Lanza, B. Agarwal, S. Jürschik, P. Sulzer, K. Breiev, A. Jordan, E. Hartungen, G. Hanel, L. Märk, et al., "Headspace analysis of new psychoactive substances using a Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer.", Int J Mass Spectrom, vol. 360, pp. 28–38, Mar, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.009
Abstract
<p>The rapid expansion in the number and use of new psychoactive substances presents a significant analytical challenge because highly sensitive instrumentation capable of detecting a broad range of chemical compounds in real-time with a low rate of false positives is required. A Selective Reagent Ionisation-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SRI-ToF-MS) instrument is capable of meeting all of these requirements. With its high mass resolution (up to m/Δm of 8000), the application of variations in reduced electric field strength (E/N) and use of different reagent ions, the ambiguity of a nominal (monoisotopic) m/z is reduced and hence the identification of chemicals in a complex chemical environment with a high level of confidence is enabled. In this study we report the use of a SRI-ToF-MS instrument to investigate the reactions of H3O(+), O2 (+), NO(+) and Kr(+) with 10 readily available (at the time of purchase) new psychoactive substances, namely 4-fluoroamphetamine, methiopropamine, ethcathinone, 4-methylethcathinone, N-ethylbuphedrone, ethylphenidate, 5-MeO-DALT, dimethocaine, 5-(2-aminopropyl)benzofuran and nitracaine. In particular, the dependence of product ion branching ratios on the reduced electric field strength for all reagent ions was investigated and is reported here. The results reported represent a significant amount of new data which will be of use for the development of drug detection techniques suitable for real world scenarios.</p>
[1565] Makhoul, S., A. Romano, L. Cappellin, G. Spano, V. Capozzi, E. Benozzi, T. D. Märk, E. Aprea, F. Gasperi, H. El-Nakat, et al., "Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for the study of the production of volatile compounds by bakery yeast starters", Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 49, pp. 850--859, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3421
Abstract
<p>The aromatic impact of bakery yeast starters is currently receiving considerable attention. The flavor characteristics of the dough and the finished products are usually evaluated by gas chromatography and sensory analysis. The limit of both techniques resides in their low-throughput character. In the present work, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer, was employed, for the first time, to measure the volatile fractions of dough and bread, and to monitor Saccharomyces cerevisiae volatile production in a fermented food matrix. Leavening was performed on small-scale (1 g) dough samples inoculated with different commercial yeast strains. The leavened doughs were then baked, and volatile profiles were determined during leavening and after baking. The experimental setup included a multifunctional autosampler, which permitted the follow-up of the leavening process on a small scale with a typical throughput of 500 distinct data points in 16 h. The system allowed to pinpoint differences between starter yeast strains in terms of volatile emission kinetics, with repercussions on the final product (i.e. the corresponding micro-loaves). This work demonstrates the applicability of PTR-MS for the study of volatile organic compound production during bread-making, for the automated and online real-time monitoring of the leavening process, and for the characterization and selection of bakery yeast starters in view of their production of volatile compounds. Copyright &copy; 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>
[1609] Makhoul, S., A. Romano, L. Cappellin, G. Spano, V. Capozzi, E. Benozzi, T. D. Märk, E. Aprea, F. Gasperi, H. El-Nakat, et al., "Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for the study of the production of volatile compounds by bakery yeast starters.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 49, pp. 850–859, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3421
Abstract
<p>The aromatic impact of bakery yeast starters is currently receiving considerable attention. The flavor characteristics of the dough and the finished products are usually evaluated by gas chromatography and sensory analysis. The limit of both techniques resides in their low-throughput character. In the present work, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer, was employed, for the first time, to measure the volatile fractions of dough and bread, and to monitor Saccharomyces cerevisiae volatile production in a fermented food matrix. Leavening was performed on small-scale (1&thinsp;g) dough samples inoculated with different commercial yeast strains. The leavened doughs were then baked, and volatile profiles were determined during leavening and after baking. The experimental setup included a multifunctional autosampler, which permitted the follow-up of the leavening process on a small scale with a typical throughput of 500 distinct data points in 16&thinsp;h. The system allowed to pinpoint differences between starter yeast strains in terms of volatile emission kinetics, with repercussions on the final product (i.e. the corresponding micro-loaves). This work demonstrates the applicability of PTR-MS for the study of volatile organic compound production during bread-making, for the automated and online real-time monitoring of the leavening process, and for the characterization and selection of bakery yeast starters in view of their production of volatile compounds.</p>
[1704] Yener, S., A. Romano, L. Cappellin, T. D. Märk, J. {Sánchez Del Pulgar}, F. Gasperi, L. Navarini, and F. Biasioli, "PTR-ToF-MS characterisation of roasted coffees (C. arabica) from different geographic origins.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 49, pp. 929–935, Sep, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3455
Abstract
<p>Characterisation of coffees according to their origins is of utmost importance for commercial qualification. In this study, the aroma profiles of different batches of three monoorigin roasted Coffea arabica coffees (Brazil, Ethiopia and Guatemala) were analysed by Proton-Transfer-Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). The measurements were performed with the aid of a multipurpose autosampler. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate data analysis techniques were applied in order to visualise data and classify the coffees according to origin. Significant differences were found in volatile profiles of coffees. Principal component analysis allowed visualising a separation of the three coffees according to geographic origin and further partial least square regression-discriminant analysis classification showed completely correct predictions. Remarkably, the samples of one batch could be used as training set to predict geographic origin of the samples of the other batch, suggesting the possibility to predict further batches in coffee production by means of the same approach. Tentative identification of mass peaks aided characterisation of aroma fractions. Classification pinpointed some volatile compounds important for discrimination of coffees.</p>
2013
[Lanza2013] Lanza, M., J. W. Acton, S. Jürschik, P. Sulzer, K. Breiev, A. Jordan, E. Hartungen, G. Hanel, L. Märk, C. A. Mayhew, et al., "Distinguishing two isomeric mephedrone substitutes with selective reagent ionisation mass spectrometry (SRI-MS)", Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 48, no. 9, pp. 1015–1018, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3253
Abstract
The isomers 4-methylethcathinone and N-ethylbuphedrone are substitutes for the recently banned drug mephedrone. We find that with conventional proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), it is not possible to distinguish between these two isomers, because essentially for both substances, only the protonated molecules are observed at a mass-to-charge ratio of 192 (C12H18NO+). However, when utilising an advanced PTR-MS instrument that allows us to switch the reagent ions (selective reagent ionisation) from H3O+ (which is commonly used in PTR-MS) to NO+, O2+ and Kr+, characteristic product (fragment) ions are detected: C4H10N+ (72 Da) for 4-methylethcathinone and C5H12N+ (86 Da) for N-ethylbuphedrone; thus, selective reagent ionisation MS proves to be a powerful tool for fast detection and identification of these compounds. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
[1591] Maihom, T., E. Schuhfried, M. Probst, J. Limtrakul, T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Fragmentation of allylmethylsulfide by chemical ionization: dependence on humidity and inhibiting role of water.", J Phys Chem A, vol. 117, pp. 5149–5160, Jun, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp4015806
Abstract
<p>We report on a previously unknown reaction mechanism involving water in the fragmentation reaction following chemical ionization. This result stems from a study presented here on the humidity-dependent and energy-dependent endoergic fragmentation of allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) upon protonation in a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). The fragmentation pathways were studied with experimental (PTR-MS) and quantum chemical methods (polarizable continuum model (PCM), microhydration, studied at the MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p)//MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory). We report in detail on the energy profiles, reaction mechanisms, and proton affinities (G4MP2 calculations). In the discovered reaction mechanism, water reduces the fragmentation of protonated species in chemical ionization. It does so by direct interaction with the protonated species via covalent binding (C3H5(+)) or via association (AMS&middot;H(+)). This stabilizes intermediate complexes and thus overall increases the activation energy for fragmentation. Water thereby acts as a reusable inhibitor (anticatalyst) in chemical ionization. Moreover, according to the quantum chemical (QC) results, when water is present in abundance it has the opposite effect and enhances fragmentation. The underlying reason is a concentration-dependent change in the reaction principle from active inhibition of fragmentation to solvation, which then enhances fragmentation. This amphoteric behavior of water is found for the fragmentation of C3H5(+) to C3H3(+), and similarly for the fragmentation of AMS&middot;H(+) to C3H5(+). The results support humidity-dependent quantification efforts for PTR-MS and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Moreover, the results should allow for a better understanding of ion-chemistry in the presence of water.</p>
[1594] Schuhfried, E., T. D. Märk, and F. Biasioli, "Primary Ion Depletion Kinetics (PIDK) Studies as a New Tool for Investigating Chemical Ionization Fragmentation Reactions with PTR-MS.", PLoS One, vol. 8, pp. e66925, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0066925
Abstract
<p>We report on a new approach for studying fragmentation channels in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), which we name primary ion depletion kinetics (PIDK). PTR-MS is a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) technique deploying hydronium ions for the chemical ionization. Induced by extremely high concentrations of analyte M, depletion of the primary ions in the drift tube occurs. This is observed as quasi zero concentration of the primary ion H3O(+), and constant MH(+). Under these non-standard conditions, we find an overall changed fragmentation. We offer two explanations. Either the changed fragmentation pattern is the result of secondary proton transfer reactions. Or, alternatively, the fast depletion of H3O(+) leads to reduced heating of H3O(+) in the drift field, and consequently changed fragmentation following protonation of the analyte M. In any case, we use the observed changes in fragmentation as a successful new approach to fragmentation studies, and term it primary ion depletion kinetics, PIDK. PIDK easily yields an abundance of continuous data points with little deviation, because they are obtained in one experimental run, even for low abundant fragments. This is an advantage over traditional internal kinetic energy variation studies (electric field per number density (E/N) variation studies). Also, some interpretation on the underlying fragmentation reaction mechanisms can be gleamed. We measure low occurring fragmentation (&lt;2% of MH(+)) of the compounds dimethyl sulfide, DMS, a compound that reportedly does not fragment, diethyl sulfide DES, and dipropyl sulfide DPS. And we confirm and complement the results with traditional E/N studies. Summing up, the new approach of primary ion depletion kinetics allows for the identification of dehydrogenation [MH(+) -H2] and adduct formation (RMH(+)) as low abundant fragmentation channels in monosulfides.</p>
[Schuhfried2013] Schuhfried, E., M. Probst, J. Limtrakul, S. Wannakao, E. Aprea, L. Cappellin, T. D. Märk, F. Gasperi, and F. Biasioli, "Sulfides: chemical ionization induced fragmentation studied with proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry and density functional calculations.", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 48, no. 3: Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 367–378, Mar, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.3153
Abstract
We report the energy-dependent fragmentation patterns upon protonation of eight sulfides (organosulfur compounds) in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Studies were carried out, both, experimentally with PTR-MS, and with theoretical quantum-chemical methods. Charge retention usually occurred at the sulfur-containing fragment for short chain sulfides. An exception to this is found in the unsaturated monosulfide allylmethyl sulfide (AMS), which preferentially fragmented to a carbo-cation at m/z 41, C3H5(+). Quantum chemical calculations (DFT with the M062X functional 6-31G(d,p) basis sets) for the fragmentation reaction pathways of AMS indicated that the most stable protonated AMS cation at m/z 89 is a protonated (cyclic) thiirane, and that the fragmentation reaction pathways of AMS in the drift tube are kinetically controlled. The protonated parent ion MH(+) is the predominant product in PTR-MS, except for diethyl disulfide at high collisional energies. The saturated monosulfides R-S-R' (with R<R') have little or no fragmentation, at the same time the most abundant fragment ion is the smaller R-S(+) fragment. The saturated disulfides R-S-S-R display more fragmentation than the saturated monosulfides, the most common fragments are disulfide containing fragments or long-chain carbo-cations. The results rationalize fragmentation data for saturated monosulfides and disulfides and represent a detailed analysis of the fragmentation of an unsaturated sulfide. Apart from the theoretical interest, the results are in support of the quantitative analysis of sulfides with PTR-MS, all the more so as PTR-MS is one of a few techniques that allow for ultra-low quantitative analysis of sulfides.
2012
[Juerschik2012] Juerschik, S., B. Agarwal, T. Kassebacher, P. Sulzer, C. A. Mayhew, and T. D. Märk, "Rapid and facile detection of four date rape drugs in different beverages utilizing proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).", J Mass Spectrom, vol. 47, no. 9: IONICON Analytik GmbH., Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020, Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 1092–1097, Sep, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jms.2993
Abstract
In this work, we illustrate the application of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) in the field of food and drink safety. We present proof-of-principle measurements of four different drinks (water, tea, red wine and white wine) each spiked separately with four different date rape drugs (chloral hydrate, tricholorethanol, γ-butyrolactone and butanediol). At first, the ideal PTR-MS operating conditions (reduced electric field strength and monitoring the most abundant [fragment] ion) for detection of the drugs were determined utilizing a time-of-flight-based PTR-MS instrument. We then dissolved small quantities of the drugs (below the activation threshold for effects on humans) into the various types of drinks and detected them using a quadrupole-based PTR-MS instrument via two different sampling methods: (1) dynamic headspace sampling and (2) direct liquid injection. Both methods have their advantages and drawbacks. Only with dynamic headspace sampling can rape drug contaminations be detected within a timeframe of seconds, and therefore, this method is the most promising use of PTR-MS as a fast, sensitive and selective monitor for the detection of food and drink contamination.
2009
[Petersson2009] Petersson, F., P. Sulzer, C. A. Mayhew, P. Watts, A. Jordan, L. Märk, and T. D. Märk, "Real-time trace detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants using recent advances in proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.", Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, vol. 23, no. 23: Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold Franzens Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 3875–3880, Dec, 2009.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rcm.4334
Abstract
This work demonstrates for the first time the potential of using recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in real-time. A high-resolution (m/Deltam up to 8000) and high-sensitivity (approximately 50 cps/ppbv) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF 8000 from Ionicon Analytik GmBH) has been successfully used to detect a number of CWA simulants at room temperature; namely dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. Importantly, we demonstrate in this paper the potential to identify CWAs with a high level of confidence in complex chemical environments, where multiple threat agents and interferents could also be present in trace amounts, thereby reducing the risk of false positives. Instantaneous detection and identification of trace quantities of chemical threats using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry could form the basis for a timely warning system capability with greater precision and accuracy than is currently provided by existing analytical technologies.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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