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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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[1492] Misztal, P.. K., E.. Nemitz, B.. Langford, C.. F. Di Marco, G.. J. Phillips, C.. N. Hewitt, A.. R. MacKenzie, S.. M. Owen, D.. Fowler, M.. R. Heal, et al., "Direct ecosystem fluxes of volatile organic compounds from oil palms in South-East Asia", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, pp. 8995–9017, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/8995/2011/
Abstract
<p>This paper reports the first direct eddy covariance fluxes of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from oil palms to the atmosphere using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), measured at a plantation in Malaysian Borneo. At midday, net isoprene flux constituted the largest fraction (84 %) of all emitted BVOCs measured, at up to 30 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 over 12 days. By contrast, the sum of its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) exhibited clear deposition of 1 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1, with a small average canopy resistance of 230 s m&minus;1. Approximately 15 % of the resolved BVOC flux from oil palm trees could be attributed to floral emissions, which are thought to be the largest reported biogenic source of estragole and possibly also toluene. Although on average the midday volume mixing ratio of estragole exceeded that of toluene by almost a factor of two, the corresponding fluxes of these two compounds were nearly the same, amounting to 0.81 and 0.76 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1, respectively. By fitting the canopy temperature and PAR response of the MEGAN emissions algorithm for isoprene and other emitted BVOCs a basal emission rate of isoprene of 7.8 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 was derived. We parameterise fluxes of depositing compounds using a resistance approach using direct canopy measurements of deposition. Consistent with Karl et al. (2010), we also propose that it is important to include deposition in flux models, especially for secondary oxidation products, in order to improve flux predictions.</p>
[Grabmer2004] Grabmer, W., M. Graus, C. Lindinger, A. Wisthaler, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, and A. Hansel, "Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of monoterpene fluxes from a Norway spruce forest using PTR-MS", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 111–115, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003914
Abstract
Interest in reliable quantification of organic trace compounds released from terrestrial ecosystems stems from their impact on oxidant levels such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals and on secondary organic aerosol formation. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, a disjunct sampler (DS) was coupled to a PTR-MS instrument. In the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique, an instantaneous grab sample is taken at intervals of tens of seconds and vertical wind speed is recorded at the instant of sample collection. The intermittent periods are used for sample analysis by a moderately fast chemical sensor, in this case a PTR-MS instrument, which allows for fast and sensitive detection of biogenic volatile organic compounds. The vertical turbulent transport of a trace compound is then calculated from the covariance of the fluctuations in vertical wind speed and compound mixing ratio. Fluxes of monoterpenes from a Norway spruce forest were measured during the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 and results compared well with data obtained using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and the enclosure approach. In addition to this field experiment, a laboratory test was carried out to validate the disjunct sampling procedure.
[Warneke2002] Warneke, C., SL. Luxembourg, JA. De Gouw, HJI. Rinne, AB. Guenther, and R. Fall, "Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of oxygenated volatile organic compounds fluxes from an alfalfa field before and after cutting", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 107, no. D8: American Geophysical Union, pp. 4067, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000594/abstract
Abstract
[1] There is interest in and significant uncertainty about the emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (oxVOCs) from vegetation to the atmosphere. Here, we measured the fluxes of selected oxVOCs from an alfalfa field, before, during, and after cutting, using a combination of disjunct eddy covariance and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry. Over the course of 1 day a significant methanol flux of 4 mg m−2 h−1 was observed from undisturbed alfalfa with a maximum at 0800 LT, possibly caused by the evaporation of dew. A smaller release of hexenals during this day (0.04 mg m−2 h−1) demonstrated the sensitivity of the method. Other results suggested that acetaldehyde and acetone were released in the afternoon but were lost by dry deposition in the evening and morning; deposition velocities were estimated to be 0.2 cm s−1 (acetaldehyde) and 0.09 cm s−1 (acetone). After the alfalfa was cut the emissions of methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and hexenals were significantly enhanced and remained high for three days during which the alfalfa was drying. After a rainstorm the oxVOC emissions from the cut, wet alfalfa increased even more. Nighttime measurements yielded low oxVOC fluxes in general, but the high variability of the concentrations during the night and the high degree of correlation between different oxVOCs suggest that the nighttime releases of oxVOCs from alfalfa were nonzero. This work suggests that the global source of oxVOCs due to the production of hay is of minor importance. The emission flux of methanol from vegetation during the growing season may be very large on a global basis.
[Rinne2001] Rinne, HJI., AB. Guenther, C. Warneke, JA. De Gouw, and SL. Luxembourg, "Disjunct eddy covariance technique for trace gas flux measurements", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 16, pp. 3139–3142, 2001.
Link: http://www.agu.org/journals/gl/gl0116/2001GL012900/pdf/2001GL012900.pdf
E
[1760] Seco, R., T. Karl, A. Guenther, K. P. Hosman, S. G. Pallardy, L. Gu, C. Geron, P. Harley, and S. Kim, "Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes duringᅡᅠan extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forestᅡᅠof the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)", Global Change Biology, vol. 21, pp. 3657–3674, Jul, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12980
Abstract
<p>Considerable amounts and varieties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are exchanged between vegetation and the surrounding air. These BVOCs play key ecological and atmospheric roles that must be adequately represented for accurately modeling the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-climate earth system. One key uncertainty in existing models is the response of BVOC fluxes to an important global change process: drought. We describe the diurnal and seasonal variation in isoprene, monoterpene, and methanol fluxes from a temperate forest ecosystem before, during, and after an extreme 2012 drought event in the Ozark region of the central USA. BVOC fluxes were dominated by isoprene, which attained high emission rates of up to 35.4 mg m(-2) h(-1) at midday. Methanol fluxes were characterized by net deposition in the morning, changing to a net emission flux through the rest of the daylight hours. Net flux of CO2 reached its seasonal maximum approximately a month earlier than isoprenoid fluxes, which highlights the differential response of photosynthesis and isoprenoid emissions to progressing drought conditions. Nevertheless, both processes were strongly suppressed under extreme drought, although isoprene fluxes remained relatively high compared to reported fluxes from other ecosystems. Methanol exchange was less affected by drought throughout the season, confirming the complex processes driving biogenic methanol fluxes. The fraction of daytime (7-17 h) assimilated carbon released back to the atmosphere combining the three BVOCs measured was 2% of gross primary productivity (GPP) and 4.9% of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) on average for our whole measurement campaign, while exceeding 5% of GPP and 10% of NEE just before the strongest drought phase. The meganv2.1 model correctly predicted diurnal variations in fluxes driven mainly by light and temperature, although further research is needed to address model BVOC fluxes during drought events.</p>
[1512] Park, J.-H.., A.. H. Goldstein, J.. Timkovsky, S.. Fares, R.. Weber, J.. Karlik, and R.. Holzinger, "Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-{MS}): comparison with PTR-{MS} measured vertical gradients and fluxes", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, pp. 20435–20482, Aug, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acpd-12-20435-2012
Abstract
<p>During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a standard proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m Δ m&minus;1) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e. co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7.1 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), and m/z 69.071 (isoprene + 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol, 1.8%, 5.3 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). Low levels of emission and/or deposition (&lt;1.6% for each, 5.8% in total flux) were observed for the additional reported masses. Overall, our results show that EC flux measurements using PTR-TOF-MS is a powerful new tool for characterizing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange including both emission and deposition for a large range of BVOC and their oxidation products.</p>
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.
[Karl2001a] Karl, T., A. Guenther, A. Jordan, R. Fall, and W. Lindinger, "Eddy covariance measurement of biogenic oxygenated VOC emissions from hay harvesting", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 491–495, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231000004052
Abstract
Biogenic oxygenated volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes have been directly measured by eddy covariance using the combination of a fast response, real-time \{VOC\} sensor and an acoustic anemometer. \{VOC\} detection is based on proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry which has currently a response time of ca. 0.8&#xa0;s and the system is suitable for making nearly unattended, long-term and continuous measurements of \{VOC\} fluxes. The eddy covariance system has a detection limit, for most VOCs, of less than 0.1&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1. The system was field tested above a hayfield near St. Johann, Austria where cut and drying grasses released a variety of VOCs. High fluxes were observed for about 2 days after cutting and were dominated by methanol (1–8.4&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1), acetaldehyde (0.5–3&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1), hexenals (0.1–1.5&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1) and acetone (0.1–1.5&#xa0;mg&#xa0;m−2&#xa0;h−1). The eddy covariance measurements generally agreed with flux estimates based on enclosure measurements and surface layer gradients. The sensitivity and selectivity of the system make it suitable for quantifying the fluxes of the dominant biogenic \{VOCs\} from a variety of landscapes and sources.
[1549] Karl, T., L. Kaser, and A. Turnipseed, "Eddy covariance measurements of isoprene and 232-MBO based on NO+ time-of-flight mass spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 365-366, pp. 15 - 19, 2014.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380613004272
Abstract
<div>Isoprene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (232-MBO) are the dominant</div> <div>biogenic \{VOCs\} released throughout the US, thus requiring simultaneous</div> <div>measurements. Recent measurements suggest the presence of isoprene</div> <div>in 232-MBO dominated ecosystems, however analytical difficulties</div> <div>make it problematic to detect both species independently. Based on</div> <div>a new chemical ionization scheme we use eddy covariance measurements</div> <div>to selectively measure fluxes of both species without analytical</div> <div>interference at the Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado.</div> <div>Our measurements show a concentration ratio between isoprene and</div> <div>232 \{MBO\} of 0.24 (ppbv/ppbv), and a flux ratio of 0.10 ([ppbv m/s]/[ppbv m/s]).</div> <div>Daytime average emission factors of isoprene and 232 \{MBO\} were</div> <div>1.4 +/- 0.3 and 16.0 +/- &nbsp;3.0 mg/m^2/h respectively.</div> <div>Both compounds exhibit light and temperature dependent fluxes. These</div> <div>findings suggest that isoprene is both locally produced and transported</div> <div>to the measurement site dominated by ponderosa pine. This makes it</div> <div>difficult to use \{MVK\} and \{MAC\} as tracers for estimating the</div> <div>photochemical age of isoprene chemistry at this site. Further our</div> <div>measurements suggest that isoprene can contribute to about 15% of</div> <div>the \{OH\} reactivity relative to 232 MBO.</div>
[Ruuskanen2011] Ruuskanen, TM., M. Müller, R. Schnitzhofer, T. Karl, M. Graus, I. Bamberger, L. Hoertnagl, F. Brilli, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Eddy covariance VOC emission and deposition fluxes above grassland using PTR-TOF", Atmos. Chem. Phys, vol. 11, pp. 611–625, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/611/2011/acp-11-611-2011.html
Abstract
Eddy covariance (EC) is the preferable technique for flux measurements since it is the only direct flux determination method. It requires a continuum of high time resolution measurements (e.g. 5–20 Hz). For volatile organic compounds (VOC) soft ionization via proton transfer reaction has proven to be a quantitative method for real time mass spectrometry; here we use a proton transfer reaction time of flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF) for 10 Hz EC measurements of full mass spectra up to m/z 315. The mass resolution of the PTR-TOF enabled the identification of chemical formulas and separation of oxygenated and hydrocarbon species exhibiting the same nominal mass. We determined 481 ion mass peaks from ambient air concentration above a managed, temperate mountain grassland in Neustift, Stubai Valley, Austria. During harvesting we found significant fluxes of 18 compounds distributed over 43 ions, including protonated parent compounds, as well as their isotopes and fragments and VOC-H+ – water clusters. The dominant BVOC fluxes were methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, hexenal and other C6 leaf wound compounds, acetone, acetic acid, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes.
[Karl2010] Karl, T., P. Harley, L. Emmons, B. Thornton, A. Guenther, C. Basu, A. Turnipseed, and K. Jardine, "Efficient atmospheric cleansing of oxidized organic trace gases by vegetation", Science, vol. 330, no. 6005: American Association for the Advancement of Science, pp. 816–819, 2010.
Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6005/816.short
Abstract
The biosphere is the major source and sink of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. Gas-phase chemical reactions initiate the removal of these compounds from the atmosphere, which ultimately proceeds via deposition at the surface or direct oxidation to carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide. We performed ecosystem-scale flux measurements that show that the removal of oxygenated VOC via dry deposition is substantially larger than is currently assumed for deciduous ecosystems. Laboratory experiments indicate efficient enzymatic conversion and potential up-regulation of various stress-related genes, leading to enhanced uptake rates as a response to ozone and methyl vinyl ketone exposure or mechanical wounding. A revised scheme for the uptake of oxygenated VOCs, incorporated into a global chemistry-transport model, predicts appreciable regional changes in annual dry deposition fluxes.
[Kim2008] Kim, S., T. Karl, R. Rasmussen, E. Apel, P. Harley, S. Waldo, S. Roberts, and A. Guenther, "Emissions and Photochemistry of BVOCs in a Ponderosa Pine woodland", AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1, pp. 0057, 2008.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.A31A0057K
Abstract
We deployed two proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry instruments (PTR-MS, IONICON ANALYTIK) for ambient and branch enclosure measurements at the Manitou Experimental Forest, located in the Southern Rocky Mountain area as a part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen (BEACHON) field campaign in 2008. Vegetation at the field site is dominated by Ponderosa Pine. BVOC emissions from Ponderosa Pine along with temperature, photosynthetic photon flux density (ppfd), relative humidity, and CO2 uptake were measured from two branch-enclosures (shade and sun). Diurnal variations and the emission response to environmental conditions are described and compared to existing models. In addition, we analyzed the speciation of BVOCs from enclosures by GC-MS. We will present quantitative and qualitative characteristics of BVOC emissions from Ponderosa Pine and analytical characteristics of PTR-MS such as fragmentation patterns of semi-volatile compounds (sesquiterpene, bornyl acetate etc) that we identified as major emissions from the enclosures. BVOC emissions observed in the enclosures will be quantitatively compared to BVOC distributions in ambient air. We explore the presence of possibly unidentified BVOCs in the forest canopy by examining PTR-MS mass spectra of enclosure and ambient air samples based on mass scans between 40 - 210 amu.
[1624] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C 6 -C 8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, Jan, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014JD022627
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1794] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C6–C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022627/abstract
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[Karl2009] Karl, T., E. Apel, A. Hodzic, DD. Riemer, DR. Blake, and C. Wiedinmyer, "Emissions of volatile organic compounds inferred from airborne flux measurements over a megacity", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 1: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 271–285, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/271/2009/acp-9-271-2009.html
Abstract
Toluene and benzene are used for assessing the ability to measure disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) on aircraft. Statistically significant correlation between vertical wind speed and mixing ratios suggests that airborne VOC eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements using PTR-MS are feasible. City-median midday toluene and benzene fluxes are calculated to be on the order of 14.1±4.0 mg/m2/h and 4.7±2.3 mg/m2/h, respectively. For comparison the adjusted CAM2004 emission inventory estimates toluene fluxes of 10 mg/m2/h along the footprint of the flight-track. Wavelet analysis of instantaneous toluene and benzene measurements during city overpasses is tested as a tool to assess surface emission heterogeneity. High toluene to benzene flux ratios above an industrial district (e.g. 10–15 g/g) including the International airport (e.g. 3–5 g/g) and a mean flux (concentration) ratio of 3.2±0.5 g/g (3.9±0.3 g/g) across Mexico City indicate that evaporative fuel and industrial emissions play an important role for the prevalence of aromatic compounds. Based on a tracer model, which was constrained by BTEX (BTEX– Benzene/Toluene/Ethylbenzene/m, p, o-Xylenes) compound concentration ratios, the fuel marker methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) and the biomass burning marker acetonitrile (CH3CN), we show that a combination of industrial, evaporative fuel, and exhaust emissions account for >87% of all BTEX sources. Our observations suggest that biomass burning emissions play a minor role for the abundance of BTEX compounds in the MCMA (2–13%).
[Kameyama2009] Kameyama, S., H. Tanimoto, S. Inomata, U. Tsunogai, A. Ooki, Y. Yokouchi, S. Takeda, H. Obata, and M. Uematsu, "Equilibrator inlet-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (EI-PTR-MS) for sensitive, high-resolution measurement of dimethyl sulfide dissolved in seawater.", Anal Chem, vol. 81, no. 21: National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-8506, Japan., pp. 9021–9026, Nov, 2009.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac901630h
Abstract
We developed an equilibrator inlet-proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (EI-PTR-MS) method for fast detection of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dissolved in seawater. Dissolved DMS extracted by bubbling pure nitrogen through the sample was continuously directed to the PTR-MS instrument. The equilibration of DMS between seawater and the carrier gas, and the response time of the system, were evaluated in the laboratory. DMS reached equilibrium with an overall response time of 1 min. The detection limit (50 pmol L(-1) at 5 s integration) was sufficient for detection of DMS concentrations in the open ocean. The EI-PTR-MS instrument was deployed during a research cruise in the western North Pacific Ocean. Comparison of the EI-PTR-MS results with results obtained by means of membrane tube equilibrator-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry agreed reasonably well on average (R(2) = 0.99). EI-PTR-MS captured temporal variations of dissolved DMS concentrations, including elevated peaks associated with patches of high biogenic activity. These results demonstrate that the EI-PTR-MS technique was effective for highly time-resolved measurements of DMS in the open ocean. Further measurements will improve our understanding of the biogeochemical mechanisms of the production, consumption, and distribution of DMS on the ocean surface and, hence, the air-sea flux of DMS, which is a climatically important species.
[Aaltonen2012] Aaltonen, H., and , "Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor", : Helsingin yliopisto, 2012.
Link: https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/37593
Abstract
Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in chemical reactions in the atmosphere and thus also affect Earth s radiation balance. In this study, chamber and snow gradient techniques for measuring boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. This study reveals that VOCs from soil are emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not correlate with the VOC fluxes. Our results show that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor accounts for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This can be utilized in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment.
[Karl2004] Karl, T., M. Potosnak, A. Guenther, D. Clark, J. Walker, J. D. Herrick, and C. Geron, "Exchange processes of volatile organic compounds above a tropical rain forest: Implications for modeling tropospheric chemistry above dense vegetation", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 109, no. D18: American Geophysical Union, pp. D18306, 2004.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2004JD004738.shtml
Abstract
Disjunct eddy covariance in conjunction with continuous in-canopy gradient measurements allowed for the first time to quantify the fine-scale source and sink distribution of some of the most abundant biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and photooxidized (MVK+MAC, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetic, and formic acid) VOCs in an old growth tropical rain forest. Our measurements revealed substantial isoprene emissions (up to 2.50 mg m−2 h−1) and light-dependent monoterpene emissions (up to 0.33 mg m−2 h−1) at the peak of the dry season (April and May 2003). Oxygenated species such as methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde were typically emitted during daytime with net fluxes up to 0.50, 0.36, and 0.20 mg m−2 h−1, respectively. When generalized for tropical rain forests, these fluxes would add up to a total emission of 36, 16, 19, 106, and 7.2 Tg/yr for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene, and monoterpenes, respectively. During nighttime we observed strong sinks for oxygenated and nitrogen-containing compounds such as methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile with deposition velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. This suggests that the canopy resistance (Rc) is very small and not the rate-limiting step for the nighttime deposition of many VOCs. Our measured mean dry deposition velocities of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile were a factor 10–20 higher than estimated from traditional deposition models. If our measurements are generalized, this could have important implications for the redistribution of VOCs in atmospheric chemistry models. Our observations indicate that the current understanding of reactive carbon exchange can only be seen as a first-order approximation.
[Klemm2006] Klemm, O., A. Held, R. Forkel, R. Gasche, H-J. Kanter, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, K. Müller, A. Plewka, C. Cojocariu, et al., "Experiments on forest/atmosphere exchange: Climatology and fluxes during two summer campaigns in NE Bavaria", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 3–20, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003165
Abstract
During two summer field campaigns in 2001 and 2002, biosphere/atmosphere exchange fluxes of energy, gases, and particles were quantified in a Norway spruce forest in NE Bavaria at 775 m a.s.l. The overall goal of the BEWA campaigns was to study the influence of the emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and an overview over the meteorological conditions, experimental frame, and the achieved results is provided. A rigorous quality assurance/quality control plan was implemented. From analysis of meteorological conditions and experimental success, golden day periods were selected for coordinated data analysis. These periods cover typical summertime conditions with various wind directions, NOx mixing ratios between 2 and 10 ppb, and O3 mixing ratios ranging between 13 and 98 ppb. Diurnal patterns of trace gas concentrations resulted from the dynamics of the boundary layer, from regional atmospheric processes (for example production of O3 in the atmosphere), and deposition. Turbulence also exhibited a diurnal pattern indicating thermal production during daytime and calm conditions during nighttime. However, in many cases, turbulence was often well developed during the nights. Horizontal advection of air masses into the trunk space occurred due to the patchiness of the forest. Nevertheless, for most conditions, the application of a one-dimensional model to describe the vertical exchange processes was appropriate. Therefore, the use of one single meteorological tower to study biosphere/atmosphere exchange is valid. Measured turbulent vertical exchange fluxes were estimated to be representative within an error of less than 25%. The results for VOC concentrations and fluxes were rather heterogeneous. Both model and measurements demonstrated that the Norway spruce trees acted as a weak source of formaldehyde.
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[Mueller2010] Müller, M., M. Graus, TM. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, I. Bamberger, L. Kaser, T. Titzmann, L. Hoertnagl, G. Wohlfahrt, T. Karl, et al., "First eddy covariance flux measurements by PTR-TOF", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 3, pp. 387–395, 2010.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AMT.....3..387M
Abstract
We have developed a High-Temperature Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (HT-PTR-MS) in which both the ion source and the ion drift tube can be continuously operated at temperatures up to 250 °C. The instrument was characterized in a high E/N-mode (130 Td) and in a low E/N-mode (87 Td) at an operating temperature of 200 °C. Instrumental sensitivities and 2σ-detection limits were on the order of 50–110 cps/ppb and 100 ppt (1 s signal integration time), respectively. The HT-PTR-MS is primarily intended for measuring "sticky" or semi-volatile trace gases. Alternatively, it may be coupled to a particle collection/thermal desorption apparatus to measure particle-bound organics in near real-time. In view of these applications, we have measured instrumental response times for a series of reference compounds. 1/e2-response times for dimethyl sulfoxide, ammonia and monoethanolamine were in the sub-second to second regime. 1/e2-response times for levoglucosan, oxalic acid and cis-pinonic acid ranged from 8 to 370 s.
[Stavrakou2011] Stavrakou, T., A. Guenther, A. Razavi, L. Clarisse, C. Clerbaux, P-F. Coheur, D. Hurtmans, F. Karagulian, M. De Mazière, C. Vigouroux, et al., "First space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes", Atmospheric chemistry and physics, vol. 11, no. 10: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4873–4898, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4873/2011/acp-11-4873-2011.html
Abstract
This study provides improved methanol emission estimates on the global scale, in particular for the largest methanol source, the terrestrial biosphere, and for biomass burning. To this purpose, one complete year of spaceborne measurements of tropospheric methanol columns retrieved for the first time by the thermal infrared sensor IASI aboard the MetOp satellite are compared with distributions calculated by the IMAGESv2 global chemistry-transport model. Two model simulations are performed using a priori biogenic methanol emissions either from the new MEGANv2.1 emission model, which is fully described in this work and is based on net ecosystem flux measurements, or from a previous parameterization based on net primary production by Jacob et al. (2005). A significantly better model performance in terms of both amplitude and seasonality is achieved through the use of MEGANv2.1 in most world regions, with respect to IASI data, and to surface- and air-based methanol measurements, even though important discrepancies over several regions are still present. As a second step of this study, we combine the MEGANv2.1 and the IASI column abundances over continents in an inverse modelling scheme based on the adjoint of the IMAGESv2 model to generate an improved global methanol emission source. The global optimized source totals 187 Tg yr−1 with a contribution of 100 Tg yr−1 from plants, only slightly lower than the a priori MEGANv2.1 value of 105 Tg yr−1. Large decreases with respect to the MEGANv2.1 biogenic source are inferred over Amazonia (up to 55 %) and Indonesia (up to 58 %), whereas more moderate reductions are recorded in the Eastern US (20–25 %) and Central Africa (25–35 %). On the other hand, the biogenic source is found to strongly increase in the arid and semi-arid regions of Central Asia (up to a factor of 5) and Western US (factor of 2), probably due to a source of methanol specific to these ecosystems which is unaccounted for in the MEGANv2.1 inventory. The most significant error reductions achieved by the optimization concern the derived biogenic emissions over the Amazon and over the Former Soviet Union. The robustness of the derived fluxes to changes in convective updraft fluxes, in methanol removal processes, and in the choice of the biogenic a priori inventory is assessed through sensitivity inversions. Detailed comparisons of the model with a number of aircraft and surface observations of methanol, as well as new methanol measurements in Europe and in the Reunion Island show that the satellite-derived methanol emissions improve significantly the agreement with the independent data, giving thus credence to the IASI dataset.
[Eerdekens2009a] Eerdekens, G., L. Ganzeveld, V-G. J de Arellano, T. Klüpfel, V. Sinha, N. Yassaa, J. Williams, H. Harder, D. Kubistin, M. Martinez, et al., "Flux estimates of isoprene, methanol and acetone from airborne PTR-MS measurements over the tropical rainforest during the GABRIEL 2005 campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 13: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4207–4227, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/4207/2009/acp-9-4207-2009.html
Abstract
Tropical forests are a strong source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to the atmosphere which can potentially impact the atmospheric oxidation capacity. Here we present airborne and ground-based BVOC measurements representative for the long dry season covering a large area of the northern Amazonian rainforest (6–3° N, 50–59° W). The measurements were conducted during the October 2005 GABRIEL (Guyanas Atmosphere-Biosphere exchange and Radicals Intensive Experiment with the Learjet) campaign. The vertical (35 m to 10 km) and diurnal (09:00–16:00) profiles of isoprene, its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone and methanol and acetone, measured by PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry), have been used to empirically estimate their emission fluxes from the forest canopy on a regional scale. The mixed layer isoprene emission flux, inferred from the airborne measurements above 300 m, is 5.7 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 after compensating for chemistry and  6.9 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 taking detrainment into account. This surface flux is in general agreement with previous tropical forest studies. Inferred methanol and acetone emission fluxes are 0.5 mg methanol m−2 h−1 and 0.35 mg acetone m−2 h−1, respectively. The BVOC measurements were compared with fluxes and mixing ratios simulated with a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM). The inferred isoprene flux is substantially smaller than that simulated with an implementation of a commonly applied BVOC emission algorithm in the SCM.
[1509] Goldstein, A. H., J. F. Karlik, S. Fares, E. Ormeno Lafuente, D. Gentner, J-H. Park, R. Weber, and M. McKay, "Flux Measurements of Biogenic Precursors to Ozone and Particulate Matter in the Central Valley", Report for the California Air Resources Board and the California Environmental Protection Agency, Aug, 2011.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/ARB FR 2011 CITRUS Final Report Contract 06-329.pdf
[1493] Langford, B.., P.. K. Misztal, E.. Nemitz, B.. Davison, C.. Helfter, T.. A. M. Pugh, A.. R. MacKenzie, S.. F. Lim, and C.. N. Hewitt, "Fluxes and concentrations of volatile organic compounds from a South-East Asian tropical rainforest", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 10, pp. 8391–8412, 2010.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/10/8391/2010/
Abstract
<p>As part of the OP3 field study of rainforest atmospheric chemistry, above-canopy fluxes of isoprene, monoterpenes and oxygenated volatile organic compounds were made by virtual disjunct eddy covariance from a South-East Asian tropical rainforest in Malaysia. Approximately 500 hours of flux data were collected over 48 days in April&ndash;May and June&ndash;July 2008. Isoprene was the dominant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted from the forest, accounting for 80% (as carbon) of the measured emission of reactive carbon fluxes. Total monoterpene emissions accounted for 18% of the measured reactive carbon flux. There was no evidence for nocturnal monoterpene emissions and during the day their flux rate was dependent on both light and temperature. The oxygenated compounds, including methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde, contributed less than 2% of the total measured reactive carbon flux. The sum of the VOC fluxes measured represents a 0.4% loss of daytime assimilated carbon by the canopy, but atmospheric chemistry box modelling suggests that most (90%) of this reactive carbon is returned back to the canopy by wet and dry deposition following chemical transformation. The emission rates of isoprene and monoterpenes, normalised to 30 &deg;C and 1000 μmol m&minus;2 s&minus;1 PAR, were 1.6 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 and 0.46mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1 respectively, which was 4 and 1.8 times lower respectively than the default value for tropical forests in the widely-used MEGAN model of biogenic VOC emissions. This highlights the need for more direct canopy-scale flux measurements of VOCs from the world&#39;s tropical forests.</p>
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[Jacob2005] Jacob, D. J., B. D. Field, Q. Li, D. R. Blake, J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, H. B. Singh, and A. Guenther, "Global budget of methanol: Constraints from atmospheric observations", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 110, no. D8: Wiley Online Library, 2005.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2004JD005172/full
Abstract
We use a global three-dimensional model simulation of atmospheric methanol to examine the consistency between observed atmospheric concentrations and current understanding of sources and sinks. Global sources in the model include 128 Tg yr−1 from plant growth, 38 Tg yr−1 from atmospheric reactions of CH3O2 with itself and other organic peroxy radicals, 23 Tg yr−1 from plant decay, 13 Tg yr−1 from biomass burning and biofuels, and 4 Tg yr−1 from vehicles and industry. The plant growth source is a factor of 3 higher for young than from mature leaves. The atmospheric lifetime of methanol in the model is 7 days; gas-phase oxidation by OH accounts for 63% of the global sink, dry deposition to land 26%, wet deposition 6%, uptake by the ocean 5%, and aqueous-phase oxidation in clouds less than 1%. The resulting simulation of atmospheric concentrations is generally unbiased in the Northern Hemisphere and reproduces the observed correlations of methanol with acetone, HCN, and CO in Asian outflow. Accounting for decreasing emission from leaves as they age is necessary to reproduce the observed seasonal variation of methanol concentrations at northern midlatitudes. The main model discrepancy is over the South Pacific, where simulated concentrations are a factor of 2 too low. Atmospheric production from the CH3O2 self-reaction is the dominant model source in this region. A factor of 2 increase in this source (to 50–100 Tg yr−1) would largely correct the discrepancy and appears consistent with independent constraints on CH3O2 concentrations. Our resulting best estimate of the global source of methanol is 240 Tg yr−1. More observations of methanol concentrations and fluxes are needed over tropical continents. Better knowledge is needed of CH3O2 concentrations in the remote troposphere and of the underlying organic chemistry.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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