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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

Welcome to the new IONICON scientific articles database!

Publications

Found 2 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Blande, James D.  [Clear All Filters]
2016
[1713] Farré-Armengol, G., J. Penuelas, T. Li, P. Yli-Pirilä, I. Filella, J. Llusia, and J. D. Blande, "Ozone degrades floral scent and reduces pollinator attraction to flowers.", New Phytol, vol. 209, pp. 152–160, Jan, 2016.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.13620
Abstract
<p>In this work we analyzed the degradation of floral scent volatiles from Brassica nigra by reaction with ozone along a distance gradient and the consequences for pollinator attraction. For this purpose we used a reaction system comprising three reaction tubes in which we conducted measurements of floral volatiles using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and GC-MS. We also tested the effects of floral scent degradation on the responses of the generalist pollinator Bombus terrestris. The chemical analyses revealed that supplementing air with ozone led to an increasing reduction in the concentrations of floral volatiles in air with distance from the volatile source. The results revealed different reactivities with ozone for different floral scent constituents, which emphasized that ozone exposure not only degrades floral scents, but also changes the ratios of compounds in a scent blend. Behavioural tests revealed that floral scent was reduced in its attractiveness to pollinators after it had been exposed to 120&nbsp;ppb O3 over a 4.5&nbsp;m distance. The combined results of chemical analyses and behavioural responses of pollinators strongly suggest that high ozone concentrations have significant negative impacts on pollination by reducing the distance over which floral olfactory signals can be detected by pollinators.</p>
2010
[Schaub2010] Schaub, A., J. D. Blande, M. Graus, E. Oksanen, J. K. Holopainen, and A. Hansel, "Real-time monitoring of herbivore induced volatile emissions in the field.", Physiol Plant, vol. 138, no. 2: Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Technikerstrasse 21a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 123–133, Feb, 2010.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.2009.01322.x
Abstract
When plants are damaged by herbivorous insects they emit a blend of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which include a range or terpenoids and green leaf volatiles (GLVs) formed via different metabolic pathways. The precise timing of these emissions upon the onset of herbivore feeding has not been fully elucidated, and the information that is available has been mainly obtained through laboratory based studies. We investigated emissions of VOCs from Populus tremula L. xP. tremuloides Michx. during the first 20 h of feeding by Epirrita autumnata (autumnal moth) larvae in a field site. The study was conducted using Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) to measure emissions online, with samples collected for subsequent analysis by complementary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for purposes of compound identification. GLV emission peaks occurred sporadically from the outset, indicating herbivore activity, while terpene emissions were induced within 16 h. We present data detailing the patterns of monoterpene (MT), GLV and sesquiterpene (SQT) emissions during the early stages of herbivore feeding showing diurnal MT and SQT emission that is correlated more with temperature than light. Peculiarities in the timing of SQT emissions prompted us to conduct a thorough characterization of the equipment used to collect VOCs and thus corroborate the accuracy of results. A laboratory based analysis of the throughput of known GLV, MT and SQT standards at different temperatures was made with PTR-MS. Enclosure temperatures of 12, 20 and 25 degrees C had little influence on the response time for dynamic measurements of a GLV or MT. However, there was a clear effect on SQT measurements. Elucidation of emission patterns in real-time is dependent upon the dynamics of cuvettes at different temperatures.

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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