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Found 11 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Mikoviny, Tomas  [Clear All Filters]
2016
[1792] Halliday, H. S., A. M. Thompson, A. Wisthaler, D. R. Blake, R. S. Hornbrook, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, P. Eichler, E. C. Apel, and A. J. Hills, "Atmospheric benzene observations from oil and gas production in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 121, 2016.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JD025327/abstract
Abstract
<p>High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected using a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the Platteville Atmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (O&amp;NG) development impacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurements were carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASA&#39;s &ldquo;Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality&rdquo; (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. The PTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontal surveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (mean benzene&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene&thinsp;=&thinsp;29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.73 ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurements indicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canister samples implicate emissions from O&amp;NG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzene source. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerly flow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that traffic emissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzene enhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from O&amp;NG operations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.</p>
[1795] Schroeder, J. R., J. H. Crawford, A. Fried, J. Walega, A. Weinheimer, A. Wisthaler, M. Müller, T. Mikoviny, G. Chen, M. Shook, et al., "Formaldehyde column density measurements as a suitable pathway to estimate near-surface ozone tendencies from space", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 121, 2016.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JD025419/full
Abstract
<p>In support of future satellite missions that aim to address the current shortcomings in measuring air quality from space, NASA&#39;s Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign was designed to enable exploration of relationships between column measurements of trace species relevant to air quality at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the DISCOVER-AQ data set, a modest correlation (r2&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.45) between ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) column densities was observed. Further analysis revealed regional variability in the O3-CH2O relationship, with Maryland having a strong relationship when data were viewed temporally and Houston having a strong relationship when data were viewed spatially. These differences in regional behavior are attributed to differences in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In Maryland, biogenic VOCs were responsible for &nbsp;28% of CH2O formation within the boundary layer column, causing CH2O to, in general, increase monotonically throughout the day. In Houston, persistent anthropogenic emissions dominated the local hydrocarbon environment, and no discernable diurnal trend in CH2O was observed. Box model simulations suggested that ambient CH2O mixing ratios have a weak diurnal trend (&plusmn;20% throughout the day) due to photochemical effects, and that larger diurnal trends are associated with changes in hydrocarbon precursors. Finally, mathematical relationships were developed from first principles and were able to replicate the different behaviors seen in Maryland and Houston. While studies would be necessary to validate these results and determine the regional applicability of the O3-CH2O relationship, the results presented here provide compelling insight into the ability of future satellite missions to aid in monitoring near-surface air quality.</p>
[1791] Müller, M., B. E. Anderson, A. J. Beyersdorf, J. H. Crawford, G. S. Diskin, P. Eichler, A. Fried, F. N. Keutsch, T. Mikoviny, K. L. Thornhill, et al., "In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 16, pp. 3813–3824, 2016.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/3813/2016/
Abstract
<p>An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed &thinsp;&sim;&thinsp;13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV&minus;1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV&minus;1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 &plusmn; 1.07 &times; 106 cm&minus;3 in the plume. Formaldehyde, acetone/propanal, acetic acid/glycolaldehyde, and maleic acid/maleic anhydride (tentatively identified) were found to be the main NMOGs to increase during 1 h of atmospheric plume processing, with the model being unable to capture the observed increase. A mass balance analysis suggests that about 50 % of the aerosol mass formed in the downwind plume is organic in nature.</p>
2015
[1624] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C 6 -C 8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, Jan, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014JD022627
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1794] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C6–C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022627/abstract
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1793] Sun, K., K. Cady-Pereira, D. J. Miller, L. Tao, M. A. Zondlo, J. B. Nowak, JA. Neuman, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, A. Wisthaler, et al., "Validation of TES ammonia observations at the single pixel scale in the San Joaquin Valley during DISCOVER-AQ", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 5140–5154, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022846/full
Abstract
<p>Ammonia measurements from a vehicle-based, mobile open-path sensor and those from aircraft were compared with Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) NH3 columns at the pixel scale during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality field experiment. Spatial and temporal mismatches were reduced by having the mobile laboratory sample in the same areas as the TES footprints. To examine how large heterogeneities in the NH3 surface mixing ratios may affect validation, a detailed spatial survey was performed within a single TES footprint around the overpass time. The TES total NH3 column above a single footprint showed excellent agreement with the in situ total column constructed from surface measurements with a difference of 2% (within the combined measurement uncertainties). The comparison was then extended to a TES transect of nine footprints where aircraft data (5&ndash;80&thinsp;ppbv) were available in a narrow spatiotemporal window (&lt;10&thinsp;km, &lt;1&thinsp;h). The TES total NH3 columns above the nine footprints agreed to within 6% of the in situ total columns derived from the aircraft-based measurements. Finally, to examine how TES captures surface spatial gradients at the interpixel scale, ground-based, mobile measurements were performed directly underneath a TES transect, covering nine footprints within &plusmn;1.5&thinsp;h of the overpass. The TES total columns were strongly correlated (R2&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.82) with the median NH3 mixing ratios measured at the surface. These results provide the first in situ validation of the TES total NH3 column product, and the methodology is applicable to other satellite observations of short-lived species at the pixel scale.</p>
2010
[Mikoviny2010] Mikoviny, T., L. Kaser, and A. Wisthaler, "Development and characterization of a high-temperature proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (HT-PTR-MS)", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 3, no. 3: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 537–544, 2010.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/3/537/2010/amt-3-537-2010.html
Abstract
We have developed a High-Temperature Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (HT-PTR-MS) in which both the ion source and the ion drift tube can be continuously operated at temperatures up to 250 °C. The instrument was characterized in a high E/N-mode (130 Td) and in a low E/N-mode (87 Td) at an operating temperature of 200 °C. Instrumental sensitivities and 2σ-detection limits were on the order of 50–110 cps/ppb and 100 ppt (1 s signal integration time), respectively. The HT-PTR-MS is primarily intended for measuring "sticky" or semi-volatile trace gases. Alternatively, it may be coupled to a particle collection/thermal desorption apparatus to measure particle-bound organics in near real-time. In view of these applications, we have measured instrumental response times for a series of reference compounds. 1/e2-response times for dimethyl sulfoxide, ammonia and monoethanolamine were in the sub-second to second regime. 1/e2-response times for levoglucosan, oxalic acid and cis-pinonic acid ranged from 8 to 370 s.
2007
[Spitaler2007] Spitaler, R., N. Araghipour, T. Mikoviny, A. Wisthaler, J. Dalla Via, and T. D. Maerk, "PTR-MS in enology: Advances in analytics and data analysis", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 266, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 1–7, 2007.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380607002266
Abstract
The present communication deals with the improvement of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) wine headspace analyses. In contrast to previous PTR-MS investigations of wine, where wine headspace was ionized by protonated ethanol clusters, the headspace was diluted by a factor of 1:40 with N2 and ionized by H3O+ ions. This method is better suited for routine applications than the previously reported method since it is simpler, faster, and the mass spectra obtained are less complex. A test wine was mixed with ethanol and with water to yield ethanol contents ranging from 10 to 15% (v/v) and these mixtures were analyzed to assess whether any quantitative differences in the composition of volatiles were detectable. The data showed no impact of the ethanol content on the wine headspace composition. The new method was applied to eight different wine samples produced from two different grape varieties: Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon. Each variety was grown in two different locations in South Tyrol (Northern Italy) and harvested at two different dates. Quantitative (but not qualitative) differences in PTR-MS spectra between the two wine varieties were observed. Using principal component analysis of selected m/z signals differentiation between Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon samples was achievable.
2006
[Mayrhofer2006] Mayrhofer, S., T. Mikoviny, S. Waldhuber, A. O. Wagner, G. Innerebner, I. H. Franke-Whittle, T. D. Maerk, A. Hansel, and H. Insam, "Microbial community related to volatile organic compound (VOC) emission in household biowaste.", Environ Microbiol, vol. 8, no. 11: Institut fuer Mikrobiologie, Universitaet Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. sabine.mayrhofer@uibk.ac.at, pp. 1960–1974, Nov, 2006.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2006.01076.x
Abstract
Malodorous emissions and potentially pathogenic microorganisms which develop during domestic organic waste collection are not only a nuisance but may also pose health risks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the presence of specific microorganisms in biowastes is directly related to the composition of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The succession of microbial communities during 16 days of storage in organic waste collection bins was studied by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA in parallel with a classical cultivation and isolation approach. Approximately 60 different bacterial species and 20 different fungal species were isolated. Additionally, some bacterial species were identified through sequencing of excised DGGE bands. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to detect VOCs over the sampling periods, and co-inertia analyses of VOC concentrations with DGGE band intensities were conducted. Positive correlations, indicating production of the respective VOC or enhancement of microbial growth, and negative correlations, indicating the use of, or microbial inhibition by the respective compound, were found for the different VOCs. Measurement of the VOC emission pattern from a pure culture of Lactococcus lactis confirmed the positive correlations for the protonated masses 89 (tentatively identified as butyric acid), 63 (tentatively identified as dimethylsulfide), 69 (likely isoprene) and 73 (likely butanone).
2004
[Boscaini2004] Boscaini, E., T. Mikoviny, A. Wisthaler, E. von Hartungen, and T. D. Märk, "Characterization of wine with PTR-MS", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 215–219, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003537
Abstract
A new method for measuring volatile profiles of alcoholic beverages (or other ethanol-containing analytes such as perfumes or herbs) has been developed. The method is based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). However, instead of hydronium ions (H3O+) protonated ethanol clusters (C2H5OH2+(C2H5OH)n = 1,2) are used as chemical ionization reagent ions. A stable reagent ion distribution is obtained by a 10-fold dilution of analyte headspace into ethanol-saturated nitrogen. Samples with different ethanol content can thus be directly compared. Characteristic mass spectral fingerprints have been obtained for four wine varieties. Principal component analysis discriminates between different wine varieties and shows specific correlations between wine variety and selected ions.
[Hartungen2004] von Hartungen, E., A. Wisthaler, T. Mikoviny, D. Jaksch, E. Boscaini, P. J. Dunphy, and T. D. Märk, "Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) of carboxylic acids: Determination of Henry's law constants and axillary odour investigations", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 243–248, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003902
Abstract
Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used as an analytical tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. Chemical ionisation of C2single bondC6 carboxylic acids by PTR-MS produced intense protonated molecular ions (with traces of hydrates) along with acylium ion fragments. Gas-phase concentrations were derived using the established method for calculating PTR-MS sensitivity factors. Henry's law constants of carboxylic acids for aqueous solutions at 40 °C were determined. Direct monitoring of volatile fatty acids, known to be associated with secretions from the human axilla, was performed via a specially designed transfer device situated in the axilla. Mass spectral data corresponded with the findings of a sensory assessor.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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