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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 83 results
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2017
[1818] Schallhart, S., P. Rantala, M. K. Kajos, J. Aalto, I. Mammarella, T. M. Ruuskanen, and M. Kulmala, "Temporal variation of {VOC} fluxes measured with {PTR}-{TOF} above a boreal forest", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, pp. 1–29, jun, 2017.
Abstract
<p>Between April and June 2013 fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in a Scots pine and Norway spruce forest using the eddy covariance (EC) method with a proton transfer reaction time of flight (PTR-TOF) mass spectrometer. The observations were performed above a boreal forest at the SMEAR II site in Southern Finland. We found a total of 25 different compounds with exchange and investigated their seasonal variations from spring to summer. The majority of the net VOC flux was comprised of methanol, monoterpenes, acetone and butene. The VOC emissions followed a seasonal trend, the released amount increased from spring to summer. Only a three compounds were emitted in April while in June emissions of some 19 VOCs were observed. During the measurements in April, the emissions were dominated by butene, while in May and June methanol was the most emitted compound. The main source of methanol is likely the growth of new biomass. During a 21-day period in June, the net VOC flux was 2.3&thinsp;nmol&thinsp;m&minus;2&thinsp;s&minus;1. This is on the lower end of PTR-TOF flux measurements from other ecosystems, which range from 2 to 10&thinsp;nmol&thinsp;m&minus;2&thinsp;s&minus;1. The EC flux results were compared with surface layer profile measurements, an indirect method using a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer, which is permanently installed at the SMEAR II site was used. For most of the compounds the fluxes, measured with the two different methods, agreed well.</p>
2015
[1582] Beale, R., J. L. Dixon, T. J. Smyth, and P. D. Nightingale, "Annual study of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in UK shelf waters", Marine Chemistry, vol. 171, pp. 96¬106, Apr, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marchem.2015.02.013
Abstract
We performed an annual study of oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC) seawater concentrations at a site off Plymouth, UK in the Western English Channel over the period of February 2011–March 2012. Acetone concentrations ranged from 2–10 nM (nanomole/L) in surface waters with a maximum observed in summer. Concentrations correlated positively with net shortwave radiation and UV light, suggestive of photochemically linked acetone production. We observed a clear decline in acetone concentrations below the mixed layer. Acetaldehyde varied between 4–37 nM in surface waters with higher values observed in autumn and winter. Surface concentrations of methanol ranged from 16–78 nM, but no clear annual cycle was observed. Methanol concentrations exhibited considerable inter-annual variability. We estimate consistent deposition to the sea surface for acetone and methanol but that the direction of the acetaldehyde flux varies during the year
[1612] Feilberg, A., P. Bildsoe, and T. Nyord, "Application of PTR-MS for measuring odorant emissions from soil application of manure slurry.", Sensors (Basel), vol. 15, pp. 1148–1167, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s150101148
Abstract
<p>Odorous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are emitted together with ammonia (NH3) from manure slurry applied as a fertilizer, but little is known about the composition and temporal variation of the emissions. In this work, a laboratory method based on dynamic flux chambers packed with soil has been used to measure emissions from untreated pig slurry and slurry treated by solid-liquid separation and ozonation. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to provide time resolved data for a range of VOC, NH3 and H2S. VOC included organic sulfur compounds, carboxylic acids, phenols, indoles, alcohols, ketones and aldehydes. H2S emission was remarkably observed to take place only in the initial minutes after slurry application, which is explained by its high partitioning into the air phase. Long-term odor effects are therefore assessed to be mainly due to other volatile compounds with low odor threshold values, such as 4-methylphenol. PTR-MS signal assignment was verified by comparison to a photo-acoustic analyzer (NH3) and to thermal desorption GC/MS (VOC). Due to initial rapid changes in odorant emissions and low concentrations of odorants, PTR-MS is assessed to be a very useful method for assessing odor following field application of slurry. The effects of treatments on odorant emissions are discussed.</p>
[1763] Kaser, L.., T.. Karl, B.. Yuan, R.. L. Mauldin, C.. A. Cantrell, A.. B. Guenther, E.. G. Patton, A.. J. Weinheimer, C.. Knote, J.. Orlando, et al., "Chemistry-turbulence interactions and mesoscale variability influence the cleansing efficiency of the atmosphere", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 42, pp. 10894–10903, Dec, 2015.
Link: http://n2t.net/ark:/85065/d7gq709d
Abstract
<p>The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere and the primary sink for isoprene, the dominant volatile organic compound emitted by vegetation. Recent research on the atmospheric oxidation capacity in isoprene-dominated environments has suggested missing radical sources leading to significant overestimation of the lifetime of isoprene. Here we report, for the first time, a comprehensive experimental budget of isoprene in the planetary boundary layer based on airborne flux measurements along with in situ OH observations in the Southeast and Central U.S. Our findings show that surface heterogeneity of isoprene emissions lead to a physical separation of isoprene and OH resulting in an effective slowdown in the chemistry. Depending on surface heterogeneity, the intensity of segregation (Is) could locally slow down isoprene chemistry up to 30%. The effect of segregated reactants in the planetary boundary layer on average has an influence on modeled OH radicals that is comparable to that of recently proposed radical recycling mechanisms.</p>
[1760] Seco, R., T. Karl, A. Guenther, K. P. Hosman, S. G. Pallardy, L. Gu, C. Geron, P. Harley, and S. Kim, "Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes duringᅡᅠan extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forestᅡᅠof the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)", Global Change Biology, vol. 21, pp. 3657–3674, Jul, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12980
Abstract
<p>Considerable amounts and varieties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are exchanged between vegetation and the surrounding air. These BVOCs play key ecological and atmospheric roles that must be adequately represented for accurately modeling the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-climate earth system. One key uncertainty in existing models is the response of BVOC fluxes to an important global change process: drought. We describe the diurnal and seasonal variation in isoprene, monoterpene, and methanol fluxes from a temperate forest ecosystem before, during, and after an extreme 2012 drought event in the Ozark region of the central USA. BVOC fluxes were dominated by isoprene, which attained high emission rates of up to 35.4 mg m(-2) h(-1) at midday. Methanol fluxes were characterized by net deposition in the morning, changing to a net emission flux through the rest of the daylight hours. Net flux of CO2 reached its seasonal maximum approximately a month earlier than isoprenoid fluxes, which highlights the differential response of photosynthesis and isoprenoid emissions to progressing drought conditions. Nevertheless, both processes were strongly suppressed under extreme drought, although isoprene fluxes remained relatively high compared to reported fluxes from other ecosystems. Methanol exchange was less affected by drought throughout the season, confirming the complex processes driving biogenic methanol fluxes. The fraction of daytime (7-17 h) assimilated carbon released back to the atmosphere combining the three BVOCs measured was 2% of gross primary productivity (GPP) and 4.9% of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) on average for our whole measurement campaign, while exceeding 5% of GPP and 10% of NEE just before the strongest drought phase. The meganv2.1 model correctly predicted diurnal variations in fluxes driven mainly by light and temperature, although further research is needed to address model BVOC fluxes during drought events.</p>
[1624] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C 6 -C 8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, Jan, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014JD022627
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1794] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C6–C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022627/abstract
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1627] Sahu, L.K.., and P. Saxena, "High time and mass resolved PTR-TOF-MS measurements of VOCs at an urban site of India during winter: Role of anthropogenic, biomass burning, biogenic and photochemical sources", Atmospheric Research, vol. 164-165, pp. 84–94, Oct, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosres.2015.04.021
Abstract
<p>This study is based on the high mass and time-resolved measurements of seven VOCs using a PTR-TOF-MS instrument at an urban site of India during winter 2013. Daily levels of OVOCs and aromatics were in the ranges of 3.5&ndash;37 ppbv and 0.85&ndash;23 ppbv, respectively with OVOCs accounted for up to 80% of total measured VOCs. The impact of long-range transport from the polluted Indo-Gangetic Plain and clean Thar desert was observed during the episodes of high and low VOCs, respectively. VOCs exhibited strong diurnal variations with peaks during morning and evening hours and lowest in the afternoon. Relatively elevated aromatics during evening hours coincided with the lowest-OVOCs indicating influence of fresh vehicular emissions. Emission ratios of isoprene and OVOCs with respect to benzene followed the diurnal cycles of temperature and solar flux indicating role of biogenic and photochemical processes, respectively. Correlation study of VOCs with benzene suggests major contribution from anthropogenic and also from biogenic and secondary sources to some extent. The higher emission ratios of ∆methanol/∆acetonitrile correspond to the episodes of long-range transport from biomass burning sources located in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). In addition to the pattern of emission, the diurnal and day-to-day variations of VOCs were influenced by the local meteorological conditions and depth of planetary boundary layer (PBL).</p>
[1664] Zannoni, N.., V.. Gros, M.. Lanza, R.. Sarda, B.. Bonsang, C.. Kalogridis, S.. Preunkert, M.. Legrand, C.. Jambert, C.. Boissard, et al., "OH reactivity and concentrations of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in a Mediterranean forest of downy oak trees", Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., vol. 15, pp. 22047--22095, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acpd-15-22047-2015
Abstract
<p>Abstract. Understanding the processes between the biosphere and the atmosphere is challenged by the difficulty to determine with enough accuracy the composition of the atmosphere. Total OH reactivity, which is defined as the total loss of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere, has proved to be an excellent tool to identify indirectly the important reactive species in ambient air. High levels of unknown reactivity were found in several forests worldwide and were often higher than at urban sites. Such results demonstrated the importance of OH reactivity for characterizing two of the major unknowns currently present associated to forests: the set of primary emissions from the canopy to the atmosphere and biogenic compounds oxidation pathways. Previous studies also highlighted the need to quantify OH reactivity and missing OH reactivity at more forested sites. Our study presents results of a field experiment conducted during late spring 2014 at the forest site at the Observatoire de Haute Provence, OHP, France. The forest is mainly composed of downy oak trees, a deciduous tree species characteristic of the Mediterranean region. We deployed the Comparative Reactivity Method and a set of state-of-the-art techniques such as Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography to measure the total OH reactivity, the concentration of volatile organic compounds and main atmospheric constituents at the site. We sampled the air masses at two heights: 2 m, i.e. inside the canopy, and 10 m, i.e. above the canopy, where the mean canopy height is 5 m. We found that the OH reactivity at the site mainly depended on the main primary biogenic species emitted by the forest, which was isoprene and to a lesser extent by its degradation products and long lived atmospheric compounds (up to 26 % during daytime). We determined that the daytime total measured reactivity equaled the calculated reactivity obtained from the concentrations of the compounds measured at the site. Hence, no significant missing reactivity is reported in this specific site, neither inside, nor above the canopy. However, during two nights we reported a missing fraction of OH reactivity up to 50 %, possibly due to unmeasured oxidation products. Our results confirm the weak intra canopy oxidation, already suggested in a previous study focused on isoprene fluxes. They also demonstrate how helpful can be the OH reactivity as a tool to clearly characterize the suite of species present in the atmosphere. We show that our result of reactivity is among the highest reported in forests worldwide and stress the importance to quantify OH reactivity at more and diverse Mediterranean forests.</p>
2014
[1516] Misztal, P.. K., T.. Karl, R.. Weber, H.. H. Jonsson, A.. B. Guenther, and A.. H. Goldstein, "Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 14, pp. 7965–8013, Mar, 2014.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/14/7965/2014/acpd-14-7965-2014.html
Abstract
<p>Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over 10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate &quot;instantaneous&quot; fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using &quot;racetrack&quot; profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 &plusmn; 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m&minus;2 h&minus;1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and coniferous forests were extremely low, high concentrations of methanol and monoterpenes were found above some of these regions. These observations demonstrate the ability to measure fluxes from specific sources by eddy covariance from an aircraft, and suggest the utility of measurements using fast response chemical sensors to constrain emission inventories and map out source distributions for a much broader array of trace gases than was observed in this study. This paper reports the first regional direct eddy covariance fluxes of isoprene. The emissions of VOCs measured from aircraft with 2 km spatial resolution can quantify the distribution of major sources providing the observations required for testing statewide emission inventories of these important trace gases. These measurements will be used in a future study to assess BVOC emission models and their driving variable datasets.</p>
[1515] Park, J.-H.., S.. Fares, R.. Weber, and A.. H. Goldstein, "Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions during BEARPEX 2009 measured by eddy covariance and flux-gradient similarity methods", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 14, pp. 231–244, Jan, 2014.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/Park et al-acp-14-231-2014.pdf
Abstract
<p>The Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment (BEARPEX) took place in Blodgett Forest, a Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA, during summer 2009. We deployed a proton transfer reaction&ndash;quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-QMS) to measure fluxes and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Eighteen ion species, including the major BVOC expected at the site, were measured sequentially at 5 heights to observe their vertical gradient from the forest floor to above the canopy. Fluxes of the 3 dominant BVOCs methanol, 2-Methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes were measured above the canopy by the disjunct eddy covariance (EC) method. Canopy-scale fluxes were also determined by the flux&ndash;gradient similarity method (K-theory). A universal K (Kuniv) was determined as the mean of individual K&#39;s calculated from the measured fluxes divided by vertical gradients for methanol, MBO, and monoterpenes. This Kuniv was then multiplied by the gradients of each observed ion species to compute their fluxes. The flux&ndash;gradient similarity method showed very good agreement with the disjunct EC method. Fluxes are presented for all measured species and compared to historical measurements from the same site, and used to test emission algorithms used to model fluxes at the regional scale. MBO was the dominant emission observed, followed by methanol, monoterpenes, acetone, and acetaldehyde. The flux&ndash;gradient similarity method is shown to be tenable, and we recommend its use, especially in experimental conditions when fast measurement of BVOC species is not available.</p>
[1549] Karl, T., L. Kaser, and A. Turnipseed, "Eddy covariance measurements of isoprene and 232-MBO based on NO+ time-of-flight mass spectrometry", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 365-366, pp. 15 - 19, 2014.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380613004272
Abstract
<div>Isoprene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (232-MBO) are the dominant</div> <div>biogenic \{VOCs\} released throughout the US, thus requiring simultaneous</div> <div>measurements. Recent measurements suggest the presence of isoprene</div> <div>in 232-MBO dominated ecosystems, however analytical difficulties</div> <div>make it problematic to detect both species independently. Based on</div> <div>a new chemical ionization scheme we use eddy covariance measurements</div> <div>to selectively measure fluxes of both species without analytical</div> <div>interference at the Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado.</div> <div>Our measurements show a concentration ratio between isoprene and</div> <div>232 \{MBO\} of 0.24 (ppbv/ppbv), and a flux ratio of 0.10 ([ppbv m/s]/[ppbv m/s]).</div> <div>Daytime average emission factors of isoprene and 232 \{MBO\} were</div> <div>1.4 +/- 0.3 and 16.0 +/- &nbsp;3.0 mg/m^2/h respectively.</div> <div>Both compounds exhibit light and temperature dependent fluxes. These</div> <div>findings suggest that isoprene is both locally produced and transported</div> <div>to the measurement site dominated by ponderosa pine. This makes it</div> <div>difficult to use \{MVK\} and \{MAC\} as tracers for estimating the</div> <div>photochemical age of isoprene chemistry at this site. Further our</div> <div>measurements suggest that isoprene can contribute to about 15% of</div> <div>the \{OH\} reactivity relative to 232 MBO.</div>
[1596] Tanimoto, H., S. Kameyama, T. Iwata, S. Inomata, and Y. Omori, "Measurement of air-sea exchange of dimethyl sulfide and acetone by PTR-MS coupled with gradient flux technique.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 48, pp. 526–533, Jan, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es4032562
Abstract
<p>We developed a new method for in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique. The PTR-MS/GF system was first deployed to determine the air-sea flux of VOCs in the open ocean of the western Pacific, in addition to carbon dioxide and water vapor. Each profiling at seven heights from the ocean surface up to 14 m took 7 min. In total, 34 vertical profiles of VOCs in the marine atmosphere just above the ocean surface were obtained. The vertical gradient observed was significant for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and acetone with the best-fit curves on quasi-logarithmic relationship. The mean fluxes of DMS and acetone were 5.5 &plusmn; 1.5 and 2.7 &plusmn; 1.3 μmol/m(2)/day, respectively. These fluxes are in general in accordance with those reported by previous expeditions.</p>
[1521] Brilli, F., B. Gioli, D. Zona, E. Pallozzi, T. Zenone, G. Fratini, C. Calfapietra, F. Loreto, I. A. Janssens, and R. Ceulemans, "Simultaneous leaf- and ecosystem-level fluxes of volatile organic compounds from a poplar-based SRC plantation", Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, vol. 187, pp. 22–35, Apr, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2013.11.006
Abstract
<p>Emission of carbon from ecosystems in the form of volatile organic compounds (VOC) represents a minorcomponent flux in the global carbon cycle that has a large impact on ground-level ozone, particle andaerosol formation and thus on air chemistry and quality. This study reports exchanges of CO2and VOCbetween a poplar-based short rotation coppice (SRC) plantation and the atmosphere, measured simul-taneously at two spatial scale, one at stand level and another at leaf level. The first technique combinedProton Transfer Reaction &ldquo;Time-of-Flight&rdquo; mass spectrometry (PTR&ndash;TOF&ndash;MS) with the eddy covariancemethod, to measure fluxes of a multitude of VOC. Abundant fluxes of isoprene, methanol and, to a lesserextent, fluxes of other oxygenated VOC such as formaldehyde, isoprene oxidation products (methyl vinylketone and methacrolein), methyl ethyl ketone, acetaldehyde, acetone and acetic acid, were measured.Under optimal environmental conditions, isoprene flux was mostly controlled by temperature and light.Differently, methanol flux underwent a combined enzymatic and stomatal control, together involvingenvironmental drivers such as vapour pressure deficit (VPD), temperature and light intensity. Moreoverfair weather condition favoured ozone deposition to the poplar plantation.The second technique involved trapping the VOCs emitted from leaves followed by gaschromatography-mass spectrometry (GC&ndash;MS) analysis. These leaf-level measurements showed thatemission of isoprene in adult leaves and of monoterpenes in juvenile leaves are widespread across poplargenotypes. Detection of isoprene oxidation products (iox) emission with leaf-level measurements con-firmed that a fraction of isoprene may be already oxidized within leaves, possibly when isoprene copeswith foliar reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during warm and sunny days.</p>
[1759] Greenberg, J.. P., J.. Penuelas, A.. Guenther, R.. Seco, A.. Turnipseed, X.. Jiang, I.. Filella, M.. Estiarte, J.. Sardans, R.. Ogaya, et al., "A tethered-balloon PTRMS sampling approach for surveying of landscape-scale biogenic VOC fluxes", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 7, pp. 2263–2271, Jul, 2014.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/amt-7-2263-2014
Abstract
<p>To survey landscape-scale fluxes of biogenic gases, a 100 m Teflon tube was attached to a tethered balloon as a sampling inlet for a fast response Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTRMS). Along with meteorological instruments deployed on the tethered balloon and at 3 m and outputs from a regional weather model, these observations were used to estimate landscape scale biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes with two micrometeorological techniques: mixed layer variance and surface layer gradients. This highly mobile sampling system was deployed at four field sites near Barcelona to estimate landscape-scale BVOC emission factors in a relatively short period (3 weeks). The two micrometeorological techniques agreed within the uncertainty of the flux measurements at all four sites even though the locations had considerable heterogeneity in species distribution and complex terrain. The observed fluxes were significantly different than emissions predicted with an emission model using site-specific emission factors and land-cover characteristics. Considering the wide range in reported BVOC emission factors of VOCs for individual vegetation species (more than an order of magnitude), this flux estimation technique is useful for constraining BVOC emission factors used as model inputs.</p>
2013
[Park2013] Park, J-H.., A.. H. Goldstein, J.. Timkovsky, S.. Fares, R.. Weber, J.. Karlik, and R.. Holzinger, "Active atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of the vast majority of detected volatile organic compounds.", Science, vol. 341, no. 6146: Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA., pp. 643–647, Aug, 2013.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/Park%20et%20al%20Science%202013.pdf
Abstract
<p>Numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exist in Earth&#39;s atmosphere, most of which originate from biogenic emissions. Despite VOCs&#39; critical role in tropospheric chemistry, studies for evaluating their atmosphere-ecosystem exchange (emission and deposition) have been limited to a few dominant compounds owing to a lack of appropriate measurement techniques. Using a high-mass resolution proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer and an absolute value eddy-covariance method, we directly measured 186 organic ions with net deposition, and 494 that have bidirectional flux. This observation of active atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of the vast majority of detected VOCs poses a challenge to current emission, air quality, and global climate models, which do not account for this extremely large range of compounds. This observation also provides new insight for understanding the atmospheric VOC budget.</p>
[1514] Karl, T.., P.. K. Misztal, H.. H. Jonsson, S.. Shertz, A.. H. Goldstein, and A.. B. Guenther, "Airborne Flux Measurements of BVOCs above Californian Oak Forests: Experimental Investigation of Surface and Entrainment Fluxes, OH Densities, and Damköhler Numbers", J. Atmos. Sci., vol. 70, pp. 3277–3287, Oct, 2013.
Link: http://nature.berkeley.edu/ahg/pubs/Karl et al 2013 JAS.pdf
Abstract
<p>Airborne flux measurements of isoprene were performed over the Californian oak belts surrounding the Central Valley. The authors demonstrate for the first time 1) the feasibility of airborne eddy covariance measurements of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds; 2) the effect of chemistry on the vertical transport of reactive species, such as isoprene; and 3) the applicability of wavelet analysis to estimate regional fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds. These flux measurements demonstrate that instrumentation operating at slower response times (e.g., 1&ndash;5 s) can still be used to determine eddy covariance fluxes in the mixed layer above land, where typical length scales of 0.5&ndash;3 km were observed. Flux divergence of isoprene measured in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is indicative of OH densities in the range of 4&ndash;7 &times; 106 molecules per cubic centimeter and allows extrapolation of airborne fluxes to the surface with Damköhler numbers (ratio between the mixing time scale and the chemical time scale) in the range of 0.3&ndash;0.9. Most of the isoprene is oxidized in the PBL with entrainment fluxes of about 10% compared to the corresponding surface fluxes. Entrainment velocities of 1&ndash;10 cm s&minus;1 were measured. The authors present implications for parameterizing PBL schemes of reactive species in regional and global models.</p>
[1443] Veres, P. R., P. Faber, F. Drewnick, J. Lelieveld, and J. Williams, "Anthropogenic sources of VOC in a football stadium: Assessing Human Emissions in the Atmosphere", Atmospheric Environment, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231013004494
Abstract
<p>Measurements of gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aerosol composition, carbon dioxide (CO2), and ozone (O3) were made inside Coface Arena in Mainz, Germany (49&deg;59&prime;3&Prime;N, 8&deg;13&prime;27&Prime;E) during a football match on April 20 2012. The VOC measurements were performed with a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS). Observed VOCs could be classified into several distinct source categories including (1) human respiration/breath, (2) ozonolysis of skin oils, and (3) cigarette smoke/combustion. In this work, we present a detailed discussion on the scale and potential impacts of VOCs emitted as a result of these sources and their contributions on local and larger scales. Human emissions of VOCs have a negligible contribution to the global atmospheric budget (&sim;1% or less) for all those quantified in this study. However, fluxes as high as 0.02 g m&minus;2 h&minus;1 and 2 &times; 10&minus;4 g m&minus;2 h&minus;1, for ethanol and acetone respectively are observed, suggesting the potential for significant impact on local air chemistry and perhaps regional scales. This study suggests that even in outdoor environments, situations exist where VOCs emitted as a result of human presence and activity are an important component of local air chemistry.</p>
[1497] Yang, M.., P.. D. Nightingale, R.. Beale, P.. S. Liss, B.. Blomquist, and C.. Fairall, "Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean", Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 110, pp. 20034–20039, Dec, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1317840110
Abstract
<p>In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air&ndash;sea methanol transfer along a &sim;10,000-km north&ndash;south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air&ndash;sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at &sim;5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface&mdash;an important term for improving air&ndash;sea gas exchange models.</p>
[1457] Beale, R., J. L. Dixon, S. R. Arnold, P. S. Liss, and P. D. Nightingale, "Methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone in the surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean", Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, vol. 118, pp. 5412–5425, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jgrc.20322
Abstract
<p>Oceanic methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone concentrations were measured during an Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) cruise from the UK to Chile (49&deg;N to 39&deg;S) in 2009. Methanol (48&ndash;361 nM) and acetone (2&ndash;24 nM) varied over the track with enrichment in the oligotrophic Northern Atlantic Gyre. Acetaldehyde showed less variability (3&ndash;9 nM) over the full extent of the transect. These oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) were also measured subsurface, with methanol and acetaldehyde mostly showing homogeneity throughout the water column. Acetone displayed a reduction below the mixed layer. OVOC concentrations did not consistently correlate with primary production or chlorophyll-a levels in the surface Atlantic Ocean. However, we did find a novel and significant negative relationship between acetone concentration and bacterial leucine incorporation, suggesting that acetone might be removed by marine bacteria as a source of carbon. Microbial turnover of both acetone and acetaldehyde was confirmed. Modeled atmospheric data are used to estimate the likely air-side OVOC concentrations. The direction and magnitude of air-sea fluxes vary for all three OVOCs depending on location. We present evidence that the ocean may exhibit regions of acetaldehyde under-saturation. Extrapolation suggests that the Atlantic Ocean represents an overall source of these OVOCs to the atmosphere at 3, 3, and 1 Tg yr&minus;1 for methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone, respectively.</p>
[Fares2013] Fares, S., R. Schnitzhofer, X. Jiang, A. Guenther, A. Hansel, and F. Loreto, "Observations of diurnal to weekly variations of monoterpene-dominated fluxes of volatile organic compounds from Mediterranean forests: implications for regional modeling.", Environ Sci Technol, Sep, 2013.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es4022156
Abstract
The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests, and dune vegetation. In this work, Basal Emission Factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parameterize the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (Community Land Model, CLM v4.0) of the Community Earth System Model (CESM v1.0). Results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parameterization.
2012
[Bamberger2012] Bamberger, I., L. Hoertnagl, T. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, M. Müller, M. Graus, T. Karl, G. Wohlfahrt, and A. Hansel, "Deposition of terpenes to vegetation-a paradigm shift towards bidirectional VOC exchange?", EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts, vol. 14, pp. 7949, 2012.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7949B
Abstract
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are important precursors for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation (Hallquist et al., 2009). In addition reactive BVOCs play a crucial role in local tropospheric ozone production (Atkinson, 2000). According to the present scientific understanding vegetation is recognized as a major VOC emission source rather than a deposition sink. Our recent observations however demonstrate that an uptake of terpene compounds to mountain grassland can be significant - at least under certain atmospheric conditions. After a severe hailstorm volume mixing ratios (VMR) of locally emitted terpene compounds originating from conifers located at the mountain slopes were strongly enhanced, even during daytime hours. Weeks after the hailstorm our PTR-MS and PTR-time-of-flight (PTR-TOF) instruments still measured deposition fluxes of monoterpenes (m/z 137.133), sesquiterpenes (m/z 205.195), and oxygenated terpenes (m/z 153.128) to the grassland. The total amount of terpenoids (on a carbon basis) deposited to the grassland during the weeks after the hailstorm is comparable to the total methanol emission of the entire growing season (Bamberger et al., 2011). These findings pose the question whether the terminology should be adjusted from VOC emission to VOC exchange.
[1512] Park, J.-H.., A.. H. Goldstein, J.. Timkovsky, S.. Fares, R.. Weber, J.. Karlik, and R.. Holzinger, "Eddy covariance emission and deposition flux measurements using proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-{MS}): comparison with PTR-{MS} measured vertical gradients and fluxes", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, pp. 20435–20482, Aug, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acpd-12-20435-2012
Abstract
<p>During summer 2010, a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) and a standard proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) were deployed simultaneously for one month in an orange orchard in the Central Valley of California to collect continuous data suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux calculations. The high time resolution (5 Hz) and high mass resolution (up to 5000 m Δ m&minus;1) data from the PTR-TOF-MS provided the basis for calculating the concentration and flux for a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC). Throughout the campaign, 664 mass peaks were detected in mass-to-charge ratios between 10 and 1278. Here we present PTR-TOF-MS EC fluxes of the 27 ion species for which the vertical gradient was simultaneously measured by PTR-MS. These EC flux data were validated through spectral analysis (i.e. co-spectrum, normalized co-spectrum, and ogive). Based on inter-comparison of the two PTR instruments, no significant instrumental biases were found in either mixing ratios or fluxes, and the data showed agreement within 5% on average for methanol and acetone. For the measured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), the EC fluxes from PTR-TOF-MS were in agreement with the qualitatively inferred flux directions from vertical gradient measurements by PTR-MS. For the 27 selected ion species reported here, the PTR-TOF-MS measured total (24 h) mean net flux of 299 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1. The dominant BVOC emissions from this site were monoterpenes (m/z 81.070 + m/z 137.131 + m/z 95.086, 34%, 102 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1) and methanol (m/z 33.032, 18%, 72 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). The next largest fluxes were detected at the following masses (attribution in parenthesis): m/z 59.048 (mostly acetone, 12.2%, 36.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 61.027 (mostly acetic acid, 11.9%, 35.7 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 93.069 (para-cymene + toluene, 4.1%, 12.2 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 45.033 (acetaldehyde, 3.8%, 11.5 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), m/z 71.048 (methylvinylketone + methacrolein, 2.4%, 7.1 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1), and m/z 69.071 (isoprene + 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol, 1.8%, 5.3 μg C m&minus;2 h&minus;1). Low levels of emission and/or deposition (&lt;1.6% for each, 5.8% in total flux) were observed for the additional reported masses. Overall, our results show that EC flux measurements using PTR-TOF-MS is a powerful new tool for characterizing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange including both emission and deposition for a large range of BVOC and their oxidation products.</p>
[Aaltonen2012] Aaltonen, H., and , "Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor", : Helsingin yliopisto, 2012.
Link: https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/37593
Abstract
Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in chemical reactions in the atmosphere and thus also affect Earth s radiation balance. In this study, chamber and snow gradient techniques for measuring boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. This study reveals that VOCs from soil are emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not correlate with the VOC fluxes. Our results show that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor accounts for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This can be utilized in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment.
[Brilli2012] Brilli, F., L. Hörtnagl, I. Bamberger, R. Schnitzhofer, T. M. Ruuskanen, A. Hansel, F. Loreto, and G. Wohlfahrt, "Qualitative and quantitative characterization of volatile organic compound emissions from cut grass.", Environ Sci Technol, vol. 46, no. 7: Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Eduard-Bodem-Gasse 3, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria., pp. 3859–3865, Apr, 2012.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es204025y
Abstract
Mechanical wounding of plants triggers the release of a blend of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). During and after mowing and harvesting of managed grasslands, significant BVOC emissions have the potential to alter the physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere and lead to ozone and aerosol formation with consequences for regional air quality. We show that the amount and composition of BVOCs emitted per unit dry weight of plant material is comparable between laboratory enclosure measurements of artificially severed grassland plant species and in situ ecosystem-scale flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland during and after periodic mowing and harvesting. The investigated grassland ecosystem emitted annually up to 130 mg carbon m(-2) in response to cutting and drying, the largest part being consistently represented by methanol and a blend of green leaf volatiles (GLV). In addition, we report the plant species-specific emission of furfural, terpenoid-like compounds (e.g., camphor), and sesquiterpenes from cut plant material, which may be used as tracers for the presence of given plant species in the ecosystem.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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