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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 11 results
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2015
[1794] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C6–C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022627/abstract
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
2012
[Aaltonen2012] Aaltonen, H., and , "Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor", : Helsingin yliopisto, 2012.
Link: https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/37593
Abstract
Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in chemical reactions in the atmosphere and thus also affect Earth s radiation balance. In this study, chamber and snow gradient techniques for measuring boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. This study reveals that VOCs from soil are emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not correlate with the VOC fluxes. Our results show that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor accounts for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This can be utilized in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment.
2011
[Stavrakou2011] Stavrakou, T., A. Guenther, A. Razavi, L. Clarisse, C. Clerbaux, P-F. Coheur, D. Hurtmans, F. Karagulian, M. De Mazière, C. Vigouroux, et al., "First space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes", Atmospheric chemistry and physics, vol. 11, no. 10: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4873–4898, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4873/2011/acp-11-4873-2011.html
Abstract
This study provides improved methanol emission estimates on the global scale, in particular for the largest methanol source, the terrestrial biosphere, and for biomass burning. To this purpose, one complete year of spaceborne measurements of tropospheric methanol columns retrieved for the first time by the thermal infrared sensor IASI aboard the MetOp satellite are compared with distributions calculated by the IMAGESv2 global chemistry-transport model. Two model simulations are performed using a priori biogenic methanol emissions either from the new MEGANv2.1 emission model, which is fully described in this work and is based on net ecosystem flux measurements, or from a previous parameterization based on net primary production by Jacob et al. (2005). A significantly better model performance in terms of both amplitude and seasonality is achieved through the use of MEGANv2.1 in most world regions, with respect to IASI data, and to surface- and air-based methanol measurements, even though important discrepancies over several regions are still present. As a second step of this study, we combine the MEGANv2.1 and the IASI column abundances over continents in an inverse modelling scheme based on the adjoint of the IMAGESv2 model to generate an improved global methanol emission source. The global optimized source totals 187 Tg yr−1 with a contribution of 100 Tg yr−1 from plants, only slightly lower than the a priori MEGANv2.1 value of 105 Tg yr−1. Large decreases with respect to the MEGANv2.1 biogenic source are inferred over Amazonia (up to 55 %) and Indonesia (up to 58 %), whereas more moderate reductions are recorded in the Eastern US (20–25 %) and Central Africa (25–35 %). On the other hand, the biogenic source is found to strongly increase in the arid and semi-arid regions of Central Asia (up to a factor of 5) and Western US (factor of 2), probably due to a source of methanol specific to these ecosystems which is unaccounted for in the MEGANv2.1 inventory. The most significant error reductions achieved by the optimization concern the derived biogenic emissions over the Amazon and over the Former Soviet Union. The robustness of the derived fluxes to changes in convective updraft fluxes, in methanol removal processes, and in the choice of the biogenic a priori inventory is assessed through sensitivity inversions. Detailed comparisons of the model with a number of aircraft and surface observations of methanol, as well as new methanol measurements in Europe and in the Reunion Island show that the satellite-derived methanol emissions improve significantly the agreement with the independent data, giving thus credence to the IASI dataset.
2010
[Mueller2010] Müller, M., M. Graus, TM. Ruuskanen, R. Schnitzhofer, I. Bamberger, L. Kaser, T. Titzmann, L. Hoertnagl, G. Wohlfahrt, T. Karl, et al., "First eddy covariance flux measurements by PTR-TOF", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 3, pp. 387–395, 2010.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AMT.....3..387M
Abstract
We have developed a High-Temperature Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (HT-PTR-MS) in which both the ion source and the ion drift tube can be continuously operated at temperatures up to 250 °C. The instrument was characterized in a high E/N-mode (130 Td) and in a low E/N-mode (87 Td) at an operating temperature of 200 °C. Instrumental sensitivities and 2σ-detection limits were on the order of 50–110 cps/ppb and 100 ppt (1 s signal integration time), respectively. The HT-PTR-MS is primarily intended for measuring "sticky" or semi-volatile trace gases. Alternatively, it may be coupled to a particle collection/thermal desorption apparatus to measure particle-bound organics in near real-time. In view of these applications, we have measured instrumental response times for a series of reference compounds. 1/e2-response times for dimethyl sulfoxide, ammonia and monoethanolamine were in the sub-second to second regime. 1/e2-response times for levoglucosan, oxalic acid and cis-pinonic acid ranged from 8 to 370 s.
2009
[Eerdekens2009a] Eerdekens, G., L. Ganzeveld, V-G. J de Arellano, T. Klüpfel, V. Sinha, N. Yassaa, J. Williams, H. Harder, D. Kubistin, M. Martinez, et al., "Flux estimates of isoprene, methanol and acetone from airborne PTR-MS measurements over the tropical rainforest during the GABRIEL 2005 campaign", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 9, no. 13: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4207–4227, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/4207/2009/acp-9-4207-2009.html
Abstract
Tropical forests are a strong source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to the atmosphere which can potentially impact the atmospheric oxidation capacity. Here we present airborne and ground-based BVOC measurements representative for the long dry season covering a large area of the northern Amazonian rainforest (6–3° N, 50–59° W). The measurements were conducted during the October 2005 GABRIEL (Guyanas Atmosphere-Biosphere exchange and Radicals Intensive Experiment with the Learjet) campaign. The vertical (35 m to 10 km) and diurnal (09:00–16:00) profiles of isoprene, its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone and methanol and acetone, measured by PTR-MS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry), have been used to empirically estimate their emission fluxes from the forest canopy on a regional scale. The mixed layer isoprene emission flux, inferred from the airborne measurements above 300 m, is 5.7 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 after compensating for chemistry and  6.9 mg isoprene m−2 h−1 taking detrainment into account. This surface flux is in general agreement with previous tropical forest studies. Inferred methanol and acetone emission fluxes are 0.5 mg methanol m−2 h−1 and 0.35 mg acetone m−2 h−1, respectively. The BVOC measurements were compared with fluxes and mixing ratios simulated with a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM). The inferred isoprene flux is substantially smaller than that simulated with an implementation of a commonly applied BVOC emission algorithm in the SCM.
2008
[Karl2008] Karl, T., A. Guenther, A. Turnipseed, EG. Patton, K. Jardine, and , "Chemical sensing of plant stress at the ecosystem scale", Biogeosciences Discussions, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 2381–2399, 2008.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00298013/
Abstract
Significant ecosystem-scale emissions of methylsalicylate (MeSA), a semivolatile plant hormone thought to act as the mobile signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) (Park et al., 2006), were observed in an agroforest. Our measurements show that plant internal defence mechanisms can be activated in response to temperature stress and are modulated by water availability on large scales. Highest MeSA fluxes (up to 0.25 mg/m2/h) were observed after plants experienced ambient night-time temperatures of  7.5°C followed by a large daytime temperature increase (e.g. up to 22°C). Under these conditions estimated night-time leaf temperatures were as low as  4.6°C, likely inducing a response to prevent chilling injury (Ding et al., 2002). Our observations imply that plant hormones can be a significant component of ecosystem scale volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes (e.g. as high as the total monoterpene (MT) flux) and therefore contribute to the missing VOC budget (de Carlo et al., 2004; Goldstein and Galbally, 2007). If generalized to other ecosystems and different types of stresses these findings suggest that semivolatile plant hormones have been overlooked by investigations of the impact of biogenic VOCs on aerosol formation events in forested regions (Kulmala et al., 2001; Boy et al., 2000). Our observations show that the presence of MeSA in canopy air serves as an early chemical warning signal indicating ecosystem-scale stresses before visible damage becomes apparent. As a chemical metric, ecosystem emission measurements of MeSA in ambient air could therefore support field studies investigating factors that adversely affect plant growth.
2006
[Klemm2006] Klemm, O., A. Held, R. Forkel, R. Gasche, H-J. Kanter, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, K. Müller, A. Plewka, C. Cojocariu, et al., "Experiments on forest/atmosphere exchange: Climatology and fluxes during two summer campaigns in NE Bavaria", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 3–20, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003165
Abstract
During two summer field campaigns in 2001 and 2002, biosphere/atmosphere exchange fluxes of energy, gases, and particles were quantified in a Norway spruce forest in NE Bavaria at 775 m a.s.l. The overall goal of the BEWA campaigns was to study the influence of the emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, and an overview over the meteorological conditions, experimental frame, and the achieved results is provided. A rigorous quality assurance/quality control plan was implemented. From analysis of meteorological conditions and experimental success, golden day periods were selected for coordinated data analysis. These periods cover typical summertime conditions with various wind directions, NOx mixing ratios between 2 and 10 ppb, and O3 mixing ratios ranging between 13 and 98 ppb. Diurnal patterns of trace gas concentrations resulted from the dynamics of the boundary layer, from regional atmospheric processes (for example production of O3 in the atmosphere), and deposition. Turbulence also exhibited a diurnal pattern indicating thermal production during daytime and calm conditions during nighttime. However, in many cases, turbulence was often well developed during the nights. Horizontal advection of air masses into the trunk space occurred due to the patchiness of the forest. Nevertheless, for most conditions, the application of a one-dimensional model to describe the vertical exchange processes was appropriate. Therefore, the use of one single meteorological tower to study biosphere/atmosphere exchange is valid. Measured turbulent vertical exchange fluxes were estimated to be representative within an error of less than 25%. The results for VOC concentrations and fluxes were rather heterogeneous. Both model and measurements demonstrated that the Norway spruce trees acted as a weak source of formaldehyde.
[Graus2006] Graus, M., A. Hansel, A. Wisthaler, C. Lindinger, R. Forkel, K. Hauff, M. Klauer, A. Pfichner, B. Rappenglück, D. Steigner, et al., "A relaxed-eddy-accumulation method for the measurement of isoprenoid canopy-fluxes using an online gas-chromatographic technique and PTR-MS simultaneously", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 43–54, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231006003190
Abstract
A relaxed-eddy-accumulation set-up using an online gas-chromatographic technique and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was applied to determine isoprenoid fluxes above a Norway spruce forest in July 2001/2002. The system was quality assured and its suitability for determination of canopy fluxes of isoprenoids was demonstrated. Flux measurements of oxygenated hydrocarbons failed the data quality check due to artefacts presumably arising from line and ozone-scrubber effects. Observations of turbulent fluxes of isoprenoids during the two field experiments show good agreements with primary flux data derived from enclosure measurements and modelling results using a canopy-chemistry emission model (CACHE).
2005
[Herndon2005] Herndon, S. C., J. T. Jayne, M. S. Zahniser, D. R. Worsnop, B. Knighton, E. Alwine, B. K. Lamb, M. Zavala, D. D. Nelson, B. J McManus, et al., "Characterization of urban pollutant emission fluxes and ambient concentration distributions using a mobile laboratory with rapid response instrumentation", Faraday Discussions, vol. 130: Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 327–339, 2005.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2005/fd/b500411j
Abstract
A large and increasing fraction of the planet’s population lives in megacities, especially in the developing world. These large metropolitan areas generally have very high levels of both gaseous and particulate air pollutants that have severe impacts on human health, ecosystem viability, and climate on local, regional, and even continental scales. Emissions fluxes and ambient pollutant concentration distributions are generally poorly characterized for large urban areas even in developed nations. Much less is known about pollutant sources and concentration patterns in the faster growing megacities of the developing world. New methods of locating and measuring pollutant emission sources and tracking subsequent atmospheric chemical transformations and distributions are required. Measurement modes utilizing an innovative van based mobile laboratory equipped with a suite of fast response instruments to characterize the complex and “nastier” chemistry of the urban boundary layer are described. Instrumentation and measurement strategies are illustrated with examples from the Mexico City and Boston metropolitan areas. It is shown that fleet average exhaust emission ratios of formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and benzene (C6H6) are substantial in Mexico City, with gasoline powered vehicles emitting higher levels normalized by fuel consumption. NH3 exhaust emissions from newer light duty vehicles in Mexico City exceed levels from similar traffic in Boston. A mobile conditional sampling air sample collection mode designed to collect samples from intercepted emission plumes for later analysis is also described.
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.
1995
[Guenther1995] Guenther, A., N. C Hewitt, D. Erickson, R. Fall, C. Geron, T. Graedel, P. Harley, L. Klinger, M. Lerdau, WA. McKay, et al., "A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions", Journal of Geophysical research, vol. 100, no. D5: American Geophysical Union, pp. 8873–8892, 1995.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/1995/94JD02950.shtml
Abstract
Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10–20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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