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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 3 results
Title [ Year(Desc)]
Search results for flux
Filters: Author is Geron, Chris  [Reset Search]
1995
[Guenther1995] Guenther, A., N. C Hewitt, D. Erickson, R. Fall, C. Geron, T. Graedel, P. Harley, L. Klinger, M. Lerdau, WA. McKay, et al., "A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions", Journal of Geophysical research, vol. 100, no. D5: American Geophysical Union, pp. 8873–8892, 1995.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/1995/94JD02950.shtml
Abstract
Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10–20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.
2004
[Karl2004] Karl, T., M. Potosnak, A. Guenther, D. Clark, J. Walker, J. D. Herrick, and C. Geron, "Exchange processes of volatile organic compounds above a tropical rain forest: Implications for modeling tropospheric chemistry above dense vegetation", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 109, no. D18: American Geophysical Union, pp. D18306, 2004.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2004JD004738.shtml
Abstract
Disjunct eddy covariance in conjunction with continuous in-canopy gradient measurements allowed for the first time to quantify the fine-scale source and sink distribution of some of the most abundant biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and photooxidized (MVK+MAC, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetic, and formic acid) VOCs in an old growth tropical rain forest. Our measurements revealed substantial isoprene emissions (up to 2.50 mg m−2 h−1) and light-dependent monoterpene emissions (up to 0.33 mg m−2 h−1) at the peak of the dry season (April and May 2003). Oxygenated species such as methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde were typically emitted during daytime with net fluxes up to 0.50, 0.36, and 0.20 mg m−2 h−1, respectively. When generalized for tropical rain forests, these fluxes would add up to a total emission of 36, 16, 19, 106, and 7.2 Tg/yr for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene, and monoterpenes, respectively. During nighttime we observed strong sinks for oxygenated and nitrogen-containing compounds such as methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile with deposition velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. This suggests that the canopy resistance (Rc) is very small and not the rate-limiting step for the nighttime deposition of many VOCs. Our measured mean dry deposition velocities of methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, MVK+MAC, and acetonitrile were a factor 10–20 higher than estimated from traditional deposition models. If our measurements are generalized, this could have important implications for the redistribution of VOCs in atmospheric chemistry models. Our observations indicate that the current understanding of reactive carbon exchange can only be seen as a first-order approximation.
2015
[1760] Seco, R., T. Karl, A. Guenther, K. P. Hosman, S. G. Pallardy, L. Gu, C. Geron, P. Harley, and S. Kim, "Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes duringᅡᅠan extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forestᅡᅠof the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)", Global Change Biology, vol. 21, pp. 3657–3674, Jul, 2015.
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcb.12980
Abstract
<p>Considerable amounts and varieties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are exchanged between vegetation and the surrounding air. These BVOCs play key ecological and atmospheric roles that must be adequately represented for accurately modeling the coupled biosphere-atmosphere-climate earth system. One key uncertainty in existing models is the response of BVOC fluxes to an important global change process: drought. We describe the diurnal and seasonal variation in isoprene, monoterpene, and methanol fluxes from a temperate forest ecosystem before, during, and after an extreme 2012 drought event in the Ozark region of the central USA. BVOC fluxes were dominated by isoprene, which attained high emission rates of up to 35.4 mg m(-2) h(-1) at midday. Methanol fluxes were characterized by net deposition in the morning, changing to a net emission flux through the rest of the daylight hours. Net flux of CO2 reached its seasonal maximum approximately a month earlier than isoprenoid fluxes, which highlights the differential response of photosynthesis and isoprenoid emissions to progressing drought conditions. Nevertheless, both processes were strongly suppressed under extreme drought, although isoprene fluxes remained relatively high compared to reported fluxes from other ecosystems. Methanol exchange was less affected by drought throughout the season, confirming the complex processes driving biogenic methanol fluxes. The fraction of daytime (7-17 h) assimilated carbon released back to the atmosphere combining the three BVOCs measured was 2% of gross primary productivity (GPP) and 4.9% of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) on average for our whole measurement campaign, while exceeding 5% of GPP and 10% of NEE just before the strongest drought phase. The meganv2.1 model correctly predicted diurnal variations in fluxes driven mainly by light and temperature, although further research is needed to address model BVOC fluxes during drought events.</p>

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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