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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 16 results
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A
[Graus2005] Graus, M., JP. Schnitzler, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Alternative Carbon Sources for Leaf Isoprene Formation", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 19, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=30
[Mueller2012] Müller, M., M. Graus, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, A. Metzger, J. Dommen, and U. Baltensperger, "Analysis of high mass resolution PTR-TOF mass spectra from 1, 3, 5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) environmental chamber experiments", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 2: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 829–843, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/829/
Abstract
A series of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) photo-oxidation experiments was performed in the 27-m3 Paul Scherrer Institute environmental chamber under various NOx conditions. A University of Innsbruck prototype high resolution Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF) was used for measurements of gas and particulate phase organics. The gas phase mass spectrum displayed  200 ion signals during the TMB photo-oxidation experiments. Molecular formulas CmHnNoOp were determined and ion signals were separated and grouped according to their C, O and N numbers. This allowed to determine the time evolution of the O:C ratio and of the average carbon oxidation state OSC of the reaction mixture. Both quantities were compared with master chemical mechanism (MCMv3.1) simulations. The O:C ratio in the particle phase was about twice the O:C ratio in the gas phase. Average carbon oxidation states of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples OSCSOA were in the range of −0.34 to −0.31, in agreement with expected average carbon oxidation states of fresh SOA (OSC = −0.5–0).
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[VanRuth2008] Van Ruth, SM., A. Koot, W. Akkermans, N. Araghipour, M. Rozijn, M. Baltussen, A. Wisthaler, TD. Märk, and R. Frankhuizen, "Butter and butter oil classification by PTR-MS", European Food Research and Technology, vol. 227, no. 1: Springer, pp. 307–317, 2008.
Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00217-007-0724-7
Abstract
The potential of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) as a tool for classification of milk fats was evaluated in relation to quality and authentication issues. Butters and butter oils were subjected to heat and off-flavouring treatments in order to create sensorially defective samples. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by means of PTR-MS analysis, sensory analysis and classical chemical analysis. Subsequently, partial least square-discriminant analysis models (PLS-DA) were fitted to predict the matrix (butter/butter oil) and the sensory grades of the samples from their PTR-MS data. Using a 10-fold cross-validation scheme, 84% of the samples were successfully classified into butter and butter oil classes. Regarding sensory quality, 89% of the samples were correctly classified. As the milk fats were fairly successfully classified by the combination of PTR-MS and PLS-DA, this combination seems a promising approach with potential applications in quality control and control of regulations.
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[Guazzotti2003] Guazzotti, SA., DT. Suess, KR. Coffee, PK. Quinn, TS. Bates, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, WP. Ball, RR. Dickerson, C. Neusüß, et al., "Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 108, no. D15: American Geophysical Union, pp. 4485, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JD003277/abstract
Abstract
A major objective of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) involves the characterization of the extent and chemical composition of pollution outflow from the Indian Subcontinent during the winter monsoon. During this season, low-level flow from the continent transports pollutants over the Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Traditional standardized aerosol particle chemical analysis, together with real-time single particle and fast-response gas-phase measurements provided characterization of the sampled aerosol chemical properties. The gas- and particle-phase chemical compositions of encountered air parcels changed according to their geographic origin, which was traced by back trajectory analysis. The temporal evolutions of acetonitrile, a long-lived specific tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles with potassium (indicative of combustion sources), and mass concentration of submicrometer non-sea-salt (nss) potassium are compared. High correlation coefficients (0.84 < r2 < 0.92) are determined for these comparisons indicating that most likely the majority of the species evolve from the same, related, or proximate sources. Aerosol and trace gas measurements provide evidence that emissions from fossil fuel and biomass/biofuel burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic pollution even in areas downwind of South Asia. Specifically, high concentrations of submicrometer nss potassium, carbon-containing particles with potassium, and acetonitrile are observed in air masses advected from the Indian subcontinent, indicating a strong impact of biomass/biofuel burning in India during the sampling periods (74 (±9)% biomass/biofuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). In contrast, lower values for these same species were measured in air masses from the Arabian Peninsula, where dominance of fossil fuel combustion is suggested by results from single-particle analysis and supported by results from gas-phase measurements (63 (±9))% fossil fuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). Results presented here demonstrate the importance of simultaneous, detailed gas- and particle-phase measurements of related species when evaluating possible source contributions to aerosols in different regions of the world.
D
[Wisthaler2013] Wisthaler, A., JH. Crawford, S. Haidacher, G. Hanel, E. Hartungen, A. Jordan, L. Märk, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, P. Mutschlechner, et al., "Development of a compact PTR-ToF-MS for Suborbital Research on the Earth's Atmospheric Composition", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 96, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf#page=97
[Grabmer2004] Grabmer, W., M. Graus, C. Lindinger, A. Wisthaler, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, and A. Hansel, "Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of monoterpene fluxes from a Norway spruce forest using PTR-MS", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 111–115, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003914
Abstract
Interest in reliable quantification of organic trace compounds released from terrestrial ecosystems stems from their impact on oxidant levels such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals and on secondary organic aerosol formation. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, a disjunct sampler (DS) was coupled to a PTR-MS instrument. In the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique, an instantaneous grab sample is taken at intervals of tens of seconds and vertical wind speed is recorded at the instant of sample collection. The intermittent periods are used for sample analysis by a moderately fast chemical sensor, in this case a PTR-MS instrument, which allows for fast and sensitive detection of biogenic volatile organic compounds. The vertical turbulent transport of a trace compound is then calculated from the covariance of the fluctuations in vertical wind speed and compound mixing ratio. Fluxes of monoterpenes from a Norway spruce forest were measured during the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 and results compared well with data obtained using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and the enclosure approach. In addition to this field experiment, a laboratory test was carried out to validate the disjunct sampling procedure.
E
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.
[Hansel1997] Hansel, A., W. Singer, A. Wisthaler, M. Schwarzmann, and W. Lindinger, "Energy dependencies of the proton transfer reactions H3O++ CH2O CH2OH++ H2O", International journal of mass spectrometry and ion processes, vol. 167: Elsevier, pp. 697–703, 1997.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168117697001286
Abstract
The proton transfer reaction system View the MathML source has been investigated in both directions as a function of the mean relative kinetic energy, KEcm, between the reactants from 0.05 eV to 1 eV in a selected ion flow drift tube (SIFDT) experiment. The rate constant kf for the forward channel follows closely the calculated collisional limiting value, kc, showing a slightly negative energy dependence. The rate constant, kr, for the reverse channel, which is endoergic by 5.2 kcal mol−1, increases from kr = 2.3 × 10−12 cm3 s−1 at KEcm = 0.05 eV to kr = 2 × 10−10 cm3 s−1 at KEcm = 1 eV. This endoergic reaction is paralleled by an associative channel forming CH2OH+·H2O, which undergoes ligand switching with water molecules to produce H3O+·H2O, yielding a bond energy BE(CH2OH+−H2O) = 27.7 kcal mol−1 in agreement with previous data. The present results are important requisites to monitor the formaldehyde concentrations in air using proton transfer reactionmass spectrometry (PTR-MS).
M
[Wisthaler2001] Wisthaler, A., NR. Jensen, R. Winterhalter, W. Lindinger, and J. Hjorth, "Measurements of acetone and other gas phase product yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of terpenes by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 35, no. 35: Elsevier, pp. 6181–6191, 2001.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231001003855
Abstract
The atmospheric oxidation of several terpenes appears to be a potentially relevant source of acetone in the atmosphere. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry was used as an on-line analytical method in a chamber study to measure acetone and other gas phase products from the oxidation of α- and β-pinene initiated by OH radicals in air and in the presence of NOx. Acetone may be formed promptly, following attack by the OH radical on the terpene, via a series of highly unstable radical intermediates. It can also be formed by slower processes, via degradation of stable non-radical intermediates such as pinonaldehyde and nopinone. Primary acetone and pinonaldehyde molar yields of 11±2% (one σ) and 34±9% (one σ), respectively, were found from the reaction between α-pinene and the OH radical. After all α-pinene had been consumed, an additional formation of acetone due to the degradation of stable non-radical intermediates was observed. The total amount of acetone formed was 15±2% (one σ) of the reacted α-pinene. An upper limit of 12±3% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of pinonaldehyde was established. From the reaction between β-pinene and the OH radicals, primary acetone and nopinone molar yields of 13±2% (one σ) and 25±3% (one σ), respectively, were observed. Additional amounts of acetone were formed by the further degradation of the primary product, such as the most abundant product nopinone. The total amount of acetone formed was 16±2% (one σ) of the reacted β-pinene. An upper limit of 12±2% (one σ) for the acetone molar yield from the oxidation of nopinone was established. The observed product yields from α- and β-pinene are in good agreement with other studies using mass-spectrometric and gas chromatographic analytical techniques, but differ significantly from previous studies using spectroscopic methods. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed.
[Mueller2009] Müller, M., LH. Mielke, M. Breitenlechner, SA. McLuckey, PB. Shepson, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "MS/MS studies for the selective detection of isomeric biogenic VOCs using a Townsend Discharge Triple Quadrupole Tandem MS and a PTR-Linear Ion Trap MS", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions, vol. 2, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 1837–1861, 2009.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech-discuss.net/2/1837/2009/
Abstract
We performed MS/MS investigations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) using a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer (QqQ-MS) equipped with a Townsend Discharge ion source and a Proton Transfer Reaction Linear Ion Trap (PTR-LIT) mass spectrometer. Both instruments use H2O chemical ionization to produce protonated molecular ions. Here we report a study of the application of these instruments to determine methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) and a series of monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, 3-carene, limonene, myrcene, ocimene) and sesquiterpenes (humulene and farnesene). Both instruments achieved sub-ppb detection limits in the single MS mode and in the MS/MS mode for differentiating MVK and MACR. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of protonated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes was studied under the high-energy, single-to-few collision conditions of the QqQ-MS instrument and under the low-energy, multiple collision conditions of the PTR-LIT. Differences and similarities in the breakdown curves obtained are discussed. In addition, we performed MS4 of protonated limonene to illustrate the analytical power of the PTR-LIT. In spite of the progress we have made, the selective on-line mass-spectrometric detection of individual monoterpenes or sesquiterpenes in complex mixtures currently does not yet seem to be possible.
N
[Stroud2002] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, WM. Angevine, FC. Fehsenfeld, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, M. Martinez-Harder, H. Harder, et al., "Nighttime isoprene trends at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidant Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 107, no. D16: Wiley Online Library, pp. ACH–7, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000959/full
Abstract
[1] Measurements of isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride, were conducted between 13 June and 14 July 1999, at the Cornelia Fort Airpark during the Nashville intensive of the Southern Oxidant Study. Trends in isoprene and its oxidation products showed marked variability from night-to-night. The reaction between isoprene and the nitrate radical was shown to be important to the chemical budget of isoprene and often caused rapid decay of isoprene mixing ratios in the evening. Trends in methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride were steady during the evening isoprene decay period, consistent with their slow reaction rate with the nitrate radical. For cases when isoprene sustained and even increased in mixing ratio throughout the night, the observed isoprene oxidation rates via the hydroxyl radical, ozone, and the nitrate radical were all small. Sustained isoprene mixing ratios within the nocturnal boundary layer give a unique opportunity to capture hydroxyl radical photochemistry at sunrise as isoprene was observed to rapidly convert to its first stage oxidation products before vertical mixing significantly redistributed chemical species. The observed nighttime isoprene variability at urban, forested sites is related to a complex coupling between nighttime boundary layer dynamics and chemistry.
[Kohl2013a] Kohl, I., J. Beauchamp, F. Cakar-Beck, J. Herbig, J. Dunkl, O. Tietje, M. Tiefenthaler, C. Boesmueller, A. Wisthaler, M. Breitenlechner, et al., "Non-invasive detection of renal function via breath gas analysis: A potential biomarker for organ acceptance?", 6th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 24, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
Abstract
Breath gas analysis is an emerging field that attempts to link components in exhaled breath gas with state-of-health or illness [1]. This is based on the premise that disease in the body will elicit abnormal biochemical reactions which in turn produce chemical compounds that might be excreted by the body - at least in part - via exhalation. We used PTR-MS to directly sample and analyse selected VOC constituents in the exhaled breath of patients (n=96) undergoing kidney transplantation. Breath samples were taken before surgery and then over an extended period thereafter. Comparison of PTR-MS data with routine blood-serum data revealed a specific compound (ion trace) at m/z 115 that correlated with creatinine in blood serum and daily urine production, which are the current generally-accepted markers for kidney function. PTR-TOF analyses revealed that this compound had an exact molecular mass of 114.104 u and a chemical composition of C7H14O. Subsequent analyses using PTR-QqQ-MS suggested the compound to be a C7-ketone or branched C7-aldehyde. It is hoped that the results of this study will provide impetus to other researchers in the field to further delve into the nature of this compound and its possible biochemical production routes to ascertain the eligibility of this compound for potential use in future routine breath analysis for renal function assessment.
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[Hansel1999] Hansel, A., A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Wisthaler, and W. Lindinger, "Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at volume mixing ratios of a few pptv", Plasma Sources Science and Technology, vol. 8, no. 2: IOP Publishing, pp. 332, 1999.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/8/2/314
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[Beauchamp2004] Beauchamp, J., A. Wisthaler, W. Grabmer, C. Neuner, A. Weber, and A. Hansel, "Short-term measurements of CO, NO, NO< sub> 2, organic compounds and PM< sub> 10 at a motorway location in an Austrian valley", Atmospheric environment, vol. 38, no. 16: Elsevier, pp. 2511–2522, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135223100400144X
Abstract
In situ measurements of CO, NOx, PM10 and certain organic compounds took place over an 11 day period encompassing a 12 h motorway blockade. Located within the Inn valley (Tirol, Austria), the monitoring site experiences varying meteorological conditions and traffic frequency throughout the day which both strongly influence air pollutant levels. Early morning increases of NOx, PM10 and aromatic hydrocarbons were clearly correlated with rising traffic. Midday minima and afternoon maxima may be explained by changing wind conditions and varying inversion layer dynamics. Night time lows in concentrations can be explained by minimal traffic activity. Classification of compound sources was made through grouping of data, separated into times when heavy duty vehicles (HDV) were permitted to use the motorway and HDV-ban periods. Increased levels of NOx and PM10 were observed from data that included periods of high HDV numbers, with levels decreasing significantly during HDV-ban periods. In contrast, the aromatic hydrocarbons and CO displayed only minor variations between these two periods. Furthermore, on typical workdays NOx levels reached a maximum that corresponded to a peak in HDV numbers, whereas the aromatic compounds peaked later when LDV numbers had reached their maximum. Our findings give strong evidence that increased NOx and PM10 levels can be predominantly attributed to HDV traffic. Principal components analyses for the separated data further support this conclusion.
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[Grabmer2006] Grabmer, W., J. Kreuzwieser, A. Wisthaler, C. Cojocariu, M. Graus, H. Rennenberg, D. Steigner, R. Steinbrecher, and A. Hansel, "VOC emissions from Norway spruce ( Picea abies L.[Karst]) twigs in the field�Results of a dynamic enclosure study", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 40: Elsevier, pp. 128–137, 2006.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135223100600327X
Abstract
During the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used for online determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by Norway spruce (Picea abies L. [Karst]) twigs in a dynamic sampling enclosure. Emissions of isoprenoids (isoprene and monoterpenes) and oxygenated VOC (OVOC; acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, and ethanol) were investigated. Emissions showed clear diurnal patterns with high daytime emission rates amounting to 1.8 μg C g−1 dwt h−1 for the sum of monoterpenes and in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 μg C g−1 dwt h−1 for isoprene>acetone>ethanol>methanol. Data were used to validate existing models on isoprene and monoterpene emissions and to discuss environmental and physiological factors affecting VOC emissions. Isoprene and acetaldehyde emission rates were best modelled applying the Guenther 1993 temperature and solar radiation algorithm. Emissions of monoterpenes, acetone and ethanol were best described by a temperature-only exponential algorithm. Using these model approaches a maximum emission variability of 66% was covered (isoprene). Poor r2 values ranging from 0.15 to 0.42 were typical for oxygenated VOC emission modelling indicating the need for model improvement e.g. development of process-based models describing the emission as a result of biochemical de novo synthesis as well as physico-chemical transport properties inside the leaves.
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[Graus2003] Graus, M., J. Kreuzwieser, J. Schnitzler, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, and H. Rennenberg, "Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.", EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, vol. 1, pp. 10692, 2003.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....10692G
Abstract
Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40 - 42°C) when net assimilation was strongly reduced. Fast dark-to-light transitions led to a strong single or double C-13 labeling of isoprene from xylem-fed [U-C-13] glucose. During a time period of 10 - 15 minutes up to 86% of all isoprene molecules became single or double C-13 labeled, resulting in a C-13 portion of up to 30% of total carbon emitted as isoprene. The results provide potential evidence that xylem-transported glucose or its degradation products can be used as additional precursors for isoprene biosynthesis and this carbon source becomes more important under conditions of limited photosynthesis.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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