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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 3 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Cooper, OR  [Clear All Filters]
2006
[Warneke2006] Warneke, C., JA. De Gouw, A. Stohl, OR. Cooper, PD. Goldan, WC. Kuster, JS. Holloway, EJ. Williams, BM. Lerner, SA. McKeen, et al., "Biomass burning and anthropogenic sources of CO over New England in the summer 2004", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 111, no. D23: American Geophysical Union, pp. D23S15, 2006.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2005JD006878.shtml
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 large wildfires were burning in Alaska and Canada, and part of the emissions were transported toward the northeast United States, where they were measured during the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 (New England Air Quality Study–Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation) study on board the NOAA WP-3 aircraft and the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown. Using acetonitrile and chloroform as tracers the biomass burning and the anthropogenic fraction of the carbon monoxide (CO) enhancement are determined. As much as 30% of the measured enhancement is attributed to the forest fires in Alaska and Canada transported into the region, and 70% is attributed to the urban emissions of mainly New York and Boston. On some days the forest fire emissions were mixed down to the surface and dominated the CO enhancement. The results compare well with the FLEXPART transport model, indicating that the total emissions during the measurement campaign for biomass burning might be about 22 Tg. The total U.S. anthropogenic CO sources used in FLEXPART are 25 Tg. FLEXPART model, using the U.S. EPA NEI-99 data, overpredicts the CO mixing ratio around Boston and New York in 2004 by about 50%.
[DeGouw2006] De Gouw, JA., C. Warneke, A. Stohl, AG. Wollny, CA. Brock, OR. Cooper, JS. Holloway, M. Trainer, FC. Fehsenfeld, EL. Atlas, et al., "Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 111, no. D10: American Geophysical Union, pp. D10303, 2006.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2006/2005JD006175.shtml
Abstract
The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.
2004
[Cooper2004] Cooper, OR., C. Forster, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, E. Dunlea, T. Ryerson, G. Huebler, F. Fehsenfeld, D. Nicks, J. Holloway, et al., "A case study of transpacific warm conveyor belt transport: Influence of merging airstreams on trace gas import to North America", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 109, no. D23: American Geophysical Union, pp. D23S08, 2004.
Link: http://www.agu.org/pubs/crossref/2004/2003JD003624.shtml
Abstract
The warm conveyor belt (WCB), the major cloud-forming airstream of midlatitude cyclones, is the primary mechanism for rapidly transporting air pollution from one continent to another. However, relatively little has been written on WCB transport across the North Pacific Ocean. To address this important intercontinental transport route, this study describes the life cycle of a WCB associated with the export of a highly polluted air mass from Asia to North America. This event was sampled using in situ measurements from an aircraft platform flying above the North American West Coast during the 2002 Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT 2K2) experiment on 5 May. Satellite imagery, trajectory ensembles, in situ measurements, and animations are used to illustrate the formation of the WCB near eastern Asia, its entrainment of polluted air masses, its transport path across the Pacific, and its decay above the eastern North Pacific Ocean and western North America. A major finding is that a WCB can entrain air from a variety of source regions and not just the atmospheric boundary layer. We estimate that 8% of the WCB's mass originated in the stratosphere and 44% passed through the lower troposphere, of which two thirds passed through the lower troposphere above the populated regions of eastern Asia. The remaining 48% traveled entirely within the middle and upper troposphere over the previous 5.5 days. Interestingly, an estimated 18% of the WCB's mass was entrained from an upwind and decaying WCB via a newly discovered but apparently common transport mechanism. Only 9% of the WCB's mass subsequently passed through the lower troposphere of the United States, with the remainder passing over North America in the middle and upper troposphere.

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F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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