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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Found 37 results
Title [ Year(Desc)]
Filters: Author is Hansel, A  [Clear All Filters]
1995
[Taucher1995] Taucher, J., A. Lagg, A. Hansel, W. Vogel, and W. Lindinger, "Methanol in human breath", Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 19, no. 5: Wiley Online Library, pp. 1147–1150, 1995.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1995.tb01593.x/abstract
Abstract
Using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry for trace gas analysis of the human breath, the concentrations of methanol and ethanol have been measured for various test persons consuming alcoholic beverages and various amounts of fruits, respectively. The methanol concentrations increased from a natural (physiological) level of ∼ 0.4 ppm up to ∼ 2 ppm a few hours after eating about 1/2 kg of fruits, and about the same concentration was reached after drinking of 100 ml brandy containing 24% volume of ethanol and 0.19% volume of methanol.
1996
[Warneke1996] Warneke, C., J. Kuczynski, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Vogel, and W. Lindinger, "Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): propanol in human breath", International journal of mass spectrometry and ion processes, vol. 154, no. 1: Elsevier, pp. 61–70, 1996.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0168117696043698
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) based on reactions of H3O+ ions has been used to measure the concentrations of propanol in 46 healthy persons, yielding an average concentration of about 150 ppb. That the measurements were not obscured by other components of the same mass as propanol was proven by comparison of PTR-MS data with separate selected-ion flow-drift tube (SIFDT) investigations of the energy dependences of reactions of H3O+ and H3O+·H2O with isopropanol, n-propanol, acetic acid and methyl formate.
1997
[Lindinger1997a] Lindinger, W., and A. Hansel, "Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Plasma Sources Science and Technology, vol. 6, no. 2: IOP Publishing, pp. 111, 1997.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/6/2/004
Abstract
A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical applications by means of breath analysis, examples of environmental trace gas analysis and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method.
[Lindinger1997] Lindinger, W., J. Taucher, A. Jordan, A. Hansel, and W. Vogel, "Endogenous production of methanol after the consumption of fruit", Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 21, no. 5: Wiley Online Library, pp. 939–943, 1997.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1997.tb03862.x/abstract
Abstract
After the consumption of fruit, the concentration of methanol in the human body increases by as much as an order of magnitude. This is due to the degradation of natural pectin (which is esterified with methyl alcohol) in the human colon. In vivo tests performed by means of proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry show that consumed pectin in either a pure form (10 to 15 g) or a natural form (in 1 kg of apples) induces a significant increase of methanol in the breath (and by inference in the blood) of humans. The amount generated from pectin (0.4 to 1.4 g) is approximately equivalent to the total daily endogenous production (measured to be 0.3 to 0.6 g/day) or that obtained from 0.3 liters of 80-proof brandy (calculated to be 0.5 g). This dietary pectin may contribute to the development of nonalcoholic cirrhosis of the liver.
[Hansel1997] Hansel, A., W. Singer, A. Wisthaler, M. Schwarzmann, and W. Lindinger, "Energy dependencies of the proton transfer reactions H3O++ CH2O CH2OH++ H2O", International journal of mass spectrometry and ion processes, vol. 167: Elsevier, pp. 697–703, 1997.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168117697001286
Abstract
The proton transfer reaction system View the MathML source has been investigated in both directions as a function of the mean relative kinetic energy, KEcm, between the reactants from 0.05 eV to 1 eV in a selected ion flow drift tube (SIFDT) experiment. The rate constant kf for the forward channel follows closely the calculated collisional limiting value, kc, showing a slightly negative energy dependence. The rate constant, kr, for the reverse channel, which is endoergic by 5.2 kcal mol−1, increases from kr = 2.3 × 10−12 cm3 s−1 at KEcm = 0.05 eV to kr = 2 × 10−10 cm3 s−1 at KEcm = 1 eV. This endoergic reaction is paralleled by an associative channel forming CH2OH+·H2O, which undergoes ligand switching with water molecules to produce H3O+·H2O, yielding a bond energy BE(CH2OH+−H2O) = 27.7 kcal mol−1 in agreement with previous data. The present results are important requisites to monitor the formaldehyde concentrations in air using proton transfer reactionmass spectrometry (PTR-MS).
1998
[Hansel1998] Hansel, A., A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger, "Improved detection limit of the proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer: On-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at mixing ratios of a few pptv", Rapid communications in mass spectrometry, vol. 12, no. 13: Wiley Online Library, pp. 871–875, 1998.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/(SICI)1097-0231(19980715)12:13%3C871::AID-RCM245%3E3.0.CO;2-L/abstract
[Prazeller1998] Prazeller, P., T. Karl, A. Jordan, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, and W. Lindinger, "Quantification of passive smoking using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry", International journal of mass spectrometry, vol. 178, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. L1–L4, 1998.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380698141532
1999
[Hansel1999] Hansel, A., A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Wisthaler, and W. Lindinger, "Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at volume mixing ratios of a few pptv", Plasma Sources Science and Technology, vol. 8, no. 2: IOP Publishing, pp. 332, 1999.
Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/8/2/314
[Boschetti1999] Boschetti, A., F. Biasioli, M. Van Opbergen, C. Warneke, A. Jordan, R. Holzinger, P. Prazeller, T. Karl, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, et al., "PTR-MS real time monitoring of the emission of volatile organic compounds during postharvest aging of berryfruit", Postharvest Biology and Technology, vol. 17, no. 3: Elsevier, pp. 143–151, 1999.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925521499000526
2000
[Crutzen2000] Crutzen, PJ., J. Williams, U. Poeschl, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, W. Lindinger, B. Scheeren, et al., "High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of primary organics and their oxidation products over the tropical forests of Surinam", Atmospheric environment, vol. 34, no. 8: Elsevier, pp. 1161–1165, 2000.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231099004823
Abstract
Tropical forests with emissions greater than 1015 g C of reactive hydrocarbons per year strongly affect atmospheric chemistry. Here we report aircraft-borne measurements of organics during March 1998 in Surinam, a largely unpolluted region which is optimally located to study chemical processes induced by tropical forest emissions. Isoprene and its degradation products methylvinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) and possibly isoprene hydroperoxides (ISOHP), were measured in the nmol mol−1 volume mixing ratio (VMR) range, consistent with estimated emissions and model calculations. In addition, high VMRs of some non-isoprene-derived organics were measured, such as acetone (≈2–4 nmol mol1 up to 12 km altitude), an important source of HO and HO2 in the upper troposphere. Moreover, several masses were measured at significant mixing ratios which could not be identified by reference to previous field measurements or gas-phase isoprene chemistry. High VMRs, almost 0.4 nmol mol−1, were also recorded for a compound which is most likely dimethyl sulphide (DMS). If so, boundary layer loss of HO by reactions with hydrocarbons and their oxidation products strongly prolongs the lifetime of DMS, allowing its transport deep into the Amazon forest south of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). We postulate greater sulphate production and deposition north than south of the (ITCZ) with possible consequences for cloud and ecosystem properties.
2001
[Williams2001] Williams, J., U. Poeschl, PJ. Crutzen, A. Hansel, R. Holzinger, C. Warneke, W. Lindinger, and J. Lelieveld, "An atmospheric chemistry interpretation of mass scans obtained from a proton transfer mass spectrometer flown over the tropical rainforest of Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 133–166, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/v26n6440307112k1.pdf
[Poeschl2001] Pöschl, U., J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, et al., "High acetone concentrations throughout the 0–12 km altitude range over the tropical rainforest in Surinam", Journal of atmospheric chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 115–132, 2001.
Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006370600615
[Warneke2001a] Warneke, C., R. Holzinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan, W. Lindinger, U. Poeschl, J. Williams, P. Hoor, H. Fischer, PJ. Crutzen, et al., "Isoprene and its oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and isoprene related peroxides measured online over the tropical rain forest of Surinam in March 1998", Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, vol. 38, no. 2: Springer, pp. 167–185, 2001.
Link: http://www.springerlink.com/index/u14w8w3187r33ur2.pdf
[Laat2001] de Laat, ATJ., JA. de Gouw, J. Lelieveld, and A. Hansel, "Model analysis of trace gas measurements and pollution impact during INDOEX", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 106, no. D22: Wiley Online Library, pp. 28469–28480, 2001.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10628469D
Abstract
An analysis of acetone (CH3COCH3) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) measurements, performed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), using a chemistry general circulation model is presented. A comparison with measurements indicates that the model simulates realistic CO and acetone distributions, except toward the Indian west coast near the surface. The latter may be related to a sea breeze circulation at the Indian west coast, which is not resolved by the model. A comparison of the measured and modeled correlation between CO and acetone indicates the presence of a background marine acetone source. A model sensitivity study suggests a global marine emission strength of 15-20 Tg acetone yr-1, which is a significant contribution to the estimated global acetone source of 56 (37-80) Tg acetone yr-1. The comparison of measured and modeled CO-acetonitrile correlation from surface measurements indicates that a model sink of acetonitrile in the marine boundary layer is missing. A model sensitivity study suggests that this could be dry deposition (deposition velocity estimate: 0.01-0.05 cms-1) on the ocean surface. A comparison of measured and modeled tropospheric acetonitrile indicates that the model overestimates the free tropospheric acetonitrile mixing ratios up to a factor of 3, which points to a missing free tropospheric sink of acetonitrile in the model. A possible explanation may be stratospheric loss and subsequent stratosphere-troposphere exchange, which was not included in the model.
[Andreae2001] Andreae, MO., P. Artaxo, H. Fischer, , J-M. Grégoire, A. Hansel, P. Hoor, R. Kormann, R. Krejci, L. Lange, et al., "Transport of biomass burning smoke to the upper troposphere by deep convection in the equatorial region", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 28, no. 6: Wiley Online Library, pp. 951–954, 2001.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2000GL012391/full
2002
[Stroud2002] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, WM. Angevine, FC. Fehsenfeld, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, M. Martinez-Harder, H. Harder, et al., "Nighttime isoprene trends at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidant Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 107, no. D16: Wiley Online Library, pp. ACH–7, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000959/full
Abstract
[1] Measurements of isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride, were conducted between 13 June and 14 July 1999, at the Cornelia Fort Airpark during the Nashville intensive of the Southern Oxidant Study. Trends in isoprene and its oxidation products showed marked variability from night-to-night. The reaction between isoprene and the nitrate radical was shown to be important to the chemical budget of isoprene and often caused rapid decay of isoprene mixing ratios in the evening. Trends in methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride were steady during the evening isoprene decay period, consistent with their slow reaction rate with the nitrate radical. For cases when isoprene sustained and even increased in mixing ratio throughout the night, the observed isoprene oxidation rates via the hydroxyl radical, ozone, and the nitrate radical were all small. Sustained isoprene mixing ratios within the nocturnal boundary layer give a unique opportunity to capture hydroxyl radical photochemistry at sunrise as isoprene was observed to rapidly convert to its first stage oxidation products before vertical mixing significantly redistributed chemical species. The observed nighttime isoprene variability at urban, forested sites is related to a complex coupling between nighttime boundary layer dynamics and chemistry.
2003
[Guazzotti2003] Guazzotti, SA., DT. Suess, KR. Coffee, PK. Quinn, TS. Bates, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, WP. Ball, RR. Dickerson, C. Neusüß, et al., "Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion", Journal of geophysical research, vol. 108, no. D15: American Geophysical Union, pp. 4485, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JD003277/abstract
Abstract
A major objective of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) involves the characterization of the extent and chemical composition of pollution outflow from the Indian Subcontinent during the winter monsoon. During this season, low-level flow from the continent transports pollutants over the Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Traditional standardized aerosol particle chemical analysis, together with real-time single particle and fast-response gas-phase measurements provided characterization of the sampled aerosol chemical properties. The gas- and particle-phase chemical compositions of encountered air parcels changed according to their geographic origin, which was traced by back trajectory analysis. The temporal evolutions of acetonitrile, a long-lived specific tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles with potassium (indicative of combustion sources), and mass concentration of submicrometer non-sea-salt (nss) potassium are compared. High correlation coefficients (0.84 < r2 < 0.92) are determined for these comparisons indicating that most likely the majority of the species evolve from the same, related, or proximate sources. Aerosol and trace gas measurements provide evidence that emissions from fossil fuel and biomass/biofuel burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic pollution even in areas downwind of South Asia. Specifically, high concentrations of submicrometer nss potassium, carbon-containing particles with potassium, and acetonitrile are observed in air masses advected from the Indian subcontinent, indicating a strong impact of biomass/biofuel burning in India during the sampling periods (74 (±9)% biomass/biofuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). In contrast, lower values for these same species were measured in air masses from the Arabian Peninsula, where dominance of fossil fuel combustion is suggested by results from single-particle analysis and supported by results from gas-phase measurements (63 (±9))% fossil fuel contribution to submicrometer carbonaceous aerosol). Results presented here demonstrate the importance of simultaneous, detailed gas- and particle-phase measurements of related species when evaluating possible source contributions to aerosols in different regions of the world.
[Kreuzwieser2003] Kreuzwieser, J., M. Graus, JP. Schnitzler, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, and A. Hansel, "Quantification of carbon sources for isoprene emission in poplar leaves", AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, vol. 1, pp. 0119, 2003.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.A32A0119K
Abstract
Isoprene is the most abundant volatile organic compound emitted by plants and in particular by trees. Current interest in understanding its biosynthesis in chloroplasts is forced by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Leaf isoprene formation is closely linked to photosynthesis by a dynamic use of recently fixed photosynthetic precursors in the chloroplast. Under steady state conditions in [13C]CO2 atmosphere approximately 75 % of isoprene became labeled within minutes. The source of unlabeled C is suggested to be of extra-chloroplastidic and/or from starch degradation. In order to test whether these alternative carbon sources - leaf internal C-pools and xylem-transported carbohydrates, contribute to leaf isoprene formation in poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) on-line proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to follow 13C-labeling kinetics.
[Karl2003c] Karl, T., A. Guenther, C. Spirig, A. Hansel, and R. Fall, "Seasonal variation of biogenic VOC emissions above a mixed hardwood forest in northern Michigan", Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 30, no. 23: Wiley Online Library, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2003GL018432/full
Abstract
Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at a hardwood forest in northern Michigan (UMBS, Prophet research site) over the course of the growing and senescing season. Methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone and isoprene were found to be the most abundant biogenic VOCs with maximum fluxes (mixing ratios in ppbv) of 2.0 mg m−2 h−1 (21.0), 1.0 mg m−2 h−1 (2.7), 1.6 mg m−2 h−1 (5.6) and 7.6 mg m−2 h−1 (6), respectively. The emission patterns show distinct seasonal changes and indicate a spring peak for methanol due to rapid leaf expansion and a fall peak for acetone and acetaldehyde most likely attributed to senescing and decaying biomass; isoprene emissions peaked as expected in the summer. We estimate potential source strengths of 8.9 Tg (C) y−1 methanol, 2.7 Tg (C) y−1 acetaldehyde and 7.0 Tg (C) y−1 acetone for deciduous temperate forests, which is a substantial contribution to the global atmospheric VOC budget.
[Graus2003] Graus, M., J. Kreuzwieser, J. Schnitzler, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, and H. Rennenberg, "Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.", EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly, vol. 1, pp. 10692, 2003.
Link: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....10692G
Abstract
Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40 - 42°C) when net assimilation was strongly reduced. Fast dark-to-light transitions led to a strong single or double C-13 labeling of isoprene from xylem-fed [U-C-13] glucose. During a time period of 10 - 15 minutes up to 86% of all isoprene molecules became single or double C-13 labeled, resulting in a C-13 portion of up to 30% of total carbon emitted as isoprene. The results provide potential evidence that xylem-transported glucose or its degradation products can be used as additional precursors for isoprene biosynthesis and this carbon source becomes more important under conditions of limited photosynthesis.
2004
[Grabmer2004] Grabmer, W., M. Graus, C. Lindinger, A. Wisthaler, B. Rappenglück, R. Steinbrecher, and A. Hansel, "Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of monoterpene fluxes from a Norway spruce forest using PTR-MS", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 239, no. 2: Elsevier, pp. 111–115, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380604003914
Abstract
Interest in reliable quantification of organic trace compounds released from terrestrial ecosystems stems from their impact on oxidant levels such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals and on secondary organic aerosol formation. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, a disjunct sampler (DS) was coupled to a PTR-MS instrument. In the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique, an instantaneous grab sample is taken at intervals of tens of seconds and vertical wind speed is recorded at the instant of sample collection. The intermittent periods are used for sample analysis by a moderately fast chemical sensor, in this case a PTR-MS instrument, which allows for fast and sensitive detection of biogenic volatile organic compounds. The vertical turbulent transport of a trace compound is then calculated from the covariance of the fluctuations in vertical wind speed and compound mixing ratio. Fluxes of monoterpenes from a Norway spruce forest were measured during the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 and results compared well with data obtained using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and the enclosure approach. In addition to this field experiment, a laboratory test was carried out to validate the disjunct sampling procedure.
[Beauchamp2004] Beauchamp, J., A. Wisthaler, W. Grabmer, C. Neuner, A. Weber, and A. Hansel, "Short-term measurements of CO, NO, NO< sub> 2, organic compounds and PM< sub> 10 at a motorway location in an Austrian valley", Atmospheric environment, vol. 38, no. 16: Elsevier, pp. 2511–2522, 2004.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135223100400144X
Abstract
In situ measurements of CO, NOx, PM10 and certain organic compounds took place over an 11 day period encompassing a 12 h motorway blockade. Located within the Inn valley (Tirol, Austria), the monitoring site experiences varying meteorological conditions and traffic frequency throughout the day which both strongly influence air pollutant levels. Early morning increases of NOx, PM10 and aromatic hydrocarbons were clearly correlated with rising traffic. Midday minima and afternoon maxima may be explained by changing wind conditions and varying inversion layer dynamics. Night time lows in concentrations can be explained by minimal traffic activity. Classification of compound sources was made through grouping of data, separated into times when heavy duty vehicles (HDV) were permitted to use the motorway and HDV-ban periods. Increased levels of NOx and PM10 were observed from data that included periods of high HDV numbers, with levels decreasing significantly during HDV-ban periods. In contrast, the aromatic hydrocarbons and CO displayed only minor variations between these two periods. Furthermore, on typical workdays NOx levels reached a maximum that corresponded to a peak in HDV numbers, whereas the aromatic compounds peaked later when LDV numbers had reached their maximum. Our findings give strong evidence that increased NOx and PM10 levels can be predominantly attributed to HDV traffic. Principal components analyses for the separated data further support this conclusion.
[Steinbrecher2004] Steinbrecher, R., B. Rappenglück, A. Hansel, M. Graus, O. Klemm, A. Held, A. Wiedensohler, and A. Nowak, "Vegetation-atmospheric interactions: The emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) and their relevance to atmospheric particle dynamics", Biogeochemistry of Forested Catchments in a Changing Environment: A Case Study in NE-Bavaria, Germany, Ecol. Stud, vol. 172, pp. 215–232, 2004.
2005
[Graus2005] Graus, M., JP. Schnitzler, J. Kreuzwieser, U. Heizmann, H. Rennenberg, A. Wisthaler, and A. Hansel, "Alternative Carbon Sources for Leaf Isoprene Formation", Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 19, 2005.
Link: http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/infofolder/contributions_ptrms.pdf#page=30
[Spirig2005] Spirig, C., A. Neftel, C. Ammann, J. Dommen, W. Grabmer, A. Thielmann, A. Schaub, J. Beauchamp, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, et al., "Eddy covariance flux measurements of biogenic VOCs during ECHO 2003 using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 465–481, 2005.
Link: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00295614/
Abstract
Within the framework of the AFO 2000 project ECHO, two PTR-MS instruments were operated in combination with sonic anemometers to determine biogenic VOC fluxes from a mixed deciduous forest site in North-Western Germany. The measurement site was characterised by a forest of inhomogeneous composition, complex canopy structure, limited extension in certain wind directions and frequent calm wind conditions during night time. The eddy covariance (EC) technique was applied since it represents the most direct flux measurement approach on the canopy scale and is, therefore, least susceptible to these non-ideal conditions. A specific flux calculation method was used to account for the sequential multi-component PTR-MS measurements and allowing an individual delay time adjustment as well as a rigorous quality control based on cospectral analysis. The validated flux results are consistent with light and temperature dependent emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from this forest, with average daytime emissions of 0.94 and 0.3µg m-2s-1, respectively. Emissions of methanol reached on average 0.087µg m-2s-1 during daytime, but fluxes were too small to be detected during night time. Upward fluxes of the isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) were also found, being two orders of magnitude lower than those of isoprene. Calculations with an analytical footprint model indicate that the observed isoprene fluxes correlate with the fraction of oaks within the footprints of the flux measurement.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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