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Found 71 results
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2016
[1795] Schroeder, J. R., J. H. Crawford, A. Fried, J. Walega, A. Weinheimer, A. Wisthaler, M. Müller, T. Mikoviny, G. Chen, M. Shook, et al., "Formaldehyde column density measurements as a suitable pathway to estimate near-surface ozone tendencies from space", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 121, 2016.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JD025419/full
Abstract
<p>In support of future satellite missions that aim to address the current shortcomings in measuring air quality from space, NASA&#39;s Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign was designed to enable exploration of relationships between column measurements of trace species relevant to air quality at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the DISCOVER-AQ data set, a modest correlation (r2&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.45) between ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) column densities was observed. Further analysis revealed regional variability in the O3-CH2O relationship, with Maryland having a strong relationship when data were viewed temporally and Houston having a strong relationship when data were viewed spatially. These differences in regional behavior are attributed to differences in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In Maryland, biogenic VOCs were responsible for &nbsp;28% of CH2O formation within the boundary layer column, causing CH2O to, in general, increase monotonically throughout the day. In Houston, persistent anthropogenic emissions dominated the local hydrocarbon environment, and no discernable diurnal trend in CH2O was observed. Box model simulations suggested that ambient CH2O mixing ratios have a weak diurnal trend (&plusmn;20% throughout the day) due to photochemical effects, and that larger diurnal trends are associated with changes in hydrocarbon precursors. Finally, mathematical relationships were developed from first principles and were able to replicate the different behaviors seen in Maryland and Houston. While studies would be necessary to validate these results and determine the regional applicability of the O3-CH2O relationship, the results presented here provide compelling insight into the ability of future satellite missions to aid in monitoring near-surface air quality.</p>
[1791] Müller, M., B. E. Anderson, A. J. Beyersdorf, J. H. Crawford, G. S. Diskin, P. Eichler, A. Fried, F. N. Keutsch, T. Mikoviny, K. L. Thornhill, et al., "In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 16, pp. 3813–3824, 2016.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/16/3813/2016/
Abstract
<p>An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed &thinsp;&sim;&thinsp;13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV&minus;1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV&minus;1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 &plusmn; 1.07 &times; 106 cm&minus;3 in the plume. Formaldehyde, acetone/propanal, acetic acid/glycolaldehyde, and maleic acid/maleic anhydride (tentatively identified) were found to be the main NMOGs to increase during 1 h of atmospheric plume processing, with the model being unable to capture the observed increase. A mass balance analysis suggests that about 50 % of the aerosol mass formed in the downwind plume is organic in nature.</p>
2015
[1794] Hu, L., D. B. Millet, M. Baasandorj, T. J. Griffis, K. R. Travis, C. W. Tessum, J. D. Marshall, W. F. Reinhart, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, et al., "Emissions of C6–C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower and aircraft measurements", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 826–842, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022627/abstract
Abstract
<p>We present two full years of continuous C6&ndash;C8 aromatic compound measurements by PTR-MS at the KCMP tall tower (Minnesota, US) and employ GEOS-Chem nested grid simulations in a Bayesian inversion to interpret the data in terms of new constraints on US aromatic emissions. Based on the tall tower data, we find that the RETRO inventory (year-2000) overestimates US C6&ndash;C8 aromatic emissions by factors of 2.0&ndash;4.5 during 2010&ndash;2011, likely due in part to post-2000 reductions. Likewise, our implementation of the US EPA&#39;s NEI08 overestimates the toluene flux by threefold, reflecting an inventory bias in non-road emissions plus uncertainties associated with species lumping. Our annual top-down emission estimates for benzene and C8 aromatics agree with the NEI08 bottom-up values, as does the inferred contribution from non-road sources. However, the NEI08 appears to underestimate on-road emissions of these compounds by twofold during the warm season. The implied aromatic sources upwind of North America are more than double the prior estimates, suggesting a substantial underestimate of East Asian emissions, or large increases there since 2000. Long-range transport exerts an important influence on ambient benzene over the US: on average 43% of its wintertime abundance in the US Upper Midwest is due to sources outside North America. Independent aircraft measurements show that the inventory biases found here for C6&ndash;C8 aromatics also apply to other parts of the US, with notable exceptions for toluene in California and Houston, Texas. Our best estimates of year-2011 contiguous US emissions are 206 (benzene), 408 (toluene), and 822 (C8 aromatics) GgC.</p>
[1793] Sun, K., K. Cady-Pereira, D. J. Miller, L. Tao, M. A. Zondlo, J. B. Nowak, JA. Neuman, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, A. Wisthaler, et al., "Validation of TES ammonia observations at the single pixel scale in the San Joaquin Valley during DISCOVER-AQ", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, vol. 120, pp. 5140–5154, 2015.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JD022846/full
Abstract
<p>Ammonia measurements from a vehicle-based, mobile open-path sensor and those from aircraft were compared with Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) NH3 columns at the pixel scale during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality field experiment. Spatial and temporal mismatches were reduced by having the mobile laboratory sample in the same areas as the TES footprints. To examine how large heterogeneities in the NH3 surface mixing ratios may affect validation, a detailed spatial survey was performed within a single TES footprint around the overpass time. The TES total NH3 column above a single footprint showed excellent agreement with the in situ total column constructed from surface measurements with a difference of 2% (within the combined measurement uncertainties). The comparison was then extended to a TES transect of nine footprints where aircraft data (5&ndash;80&thinsp;ppbv) were available in a narrow spatiotemporal window (&lt;10&thinsp;km, &lt;1&thinsp;h). The TES total NH3 columns above the nine footprints agreed to within 6% of the in situ total columns derived from the aircraft-based measurements. Finally, to examine how TES captures surface spatial gradients at the interpixel scale, ground-based, mobile measurements were performed directly underneath a TES transect, covering nine footprints within &plusmn;1.5&thinsp;h of the overpass. The TES total columns were strongly correlated (R2&thinsp;=&thinsp;0.82) with the median NH3 mixing ratios measured at the surface. These results provide the first in situ validation of the TES total NH3 column product, and the methodology is applicable to other satellite observations of short-lived species at the pixel scale.</p>
2014
[1790] Müller, M., T. Mikoviny, S. Feil, S. Haidacher, G. Hanel, E. Hartungen, A. Jordan, L. Märk, P. Mutschlechner, R. Schottkowsky, et al., "A compact PTR-ToF-MS instrument for airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds at high spatiotemporal resolution", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, vol. 7, pp. 3763–3772, 2014.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech.net/7/3763/2014/
Abstract
<p>Herein, we report on the development of a compact proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) for airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The new instrument resolves isobaric ions with a mass resolving power (m/Δm) of &nbsp;1000, provides accurate m/z measurements (Δm &lt; 3 mDa), records full mass spectra at 1 Hz and thus overcomes some of the major analytical deficiencies of quadrupole-MS-based airborne instruments. 1 Hz detection limits for biogenic VOCs (isoprene, α total monoterpenes), aromatic VOCs (benzene, toluene, xylenes) and ketones (acetone, methyl ethyl ketone) range from 0.05 to 0.12 ppbV, making the instrument well-suited for fast measurements of abundant VOCs in the continental boundary layer. The instrument detects and quantifies VOCs in locally confined plumes (&lt; 1 km), which improves our capability of characterizing emission sources and atmospheric processing within plumes. A deployment during the NASA 2013 DISCOVER-AQ mission generated high vertical- and horizontal-resolution in situ data of VOCs and ammonia for the validation of satellite retrievals and chemistry transport models.</p>
2013
[Sulzer2013a] Sulzer, P., B. Agarwal, S. Juerschik, M. Lanza, A. Jordan, E. Hartungen, G. Hanel, L. Märk, T. D. Märk, R. González-Méndez, et al., "Applications of switching reagent ions in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometric instruments for the improved selectivity of explosive compounds", International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, vol. 354–355: Elsevier, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387380613001735
Abstract
<p>Here we demonstrate the use of a switchable reagent ion proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (SRI-PTR-MS) instrument to improve the instrument&#39;s selectivity for the detection of the explosive compounds 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5 trinitrobenzene (TNB), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX). Selectivity is improved owing to the production of different product ions resulting from changes in the reagent ion-molecule chemistry. To be of use as an analytical tool for homeland security applications, it is important that the reagent ions (and hence product ions) can be rapidly changed (within seconds) from H3O+ to another dominant ion species if the technology is to be acceptable. This paper presents measurements that show how it is possible to rapidly switch the reagent ion from H3O+ to either O2+ or NO+ to enhance selectivity for the detection of the four explosives named above. That switching reagent ions can be done quickly results from the fact that the recombination energies of O2+ and NO+ are less than the ionisation potential of H2O, i.e. charge transfer cannot occur which otherwise would result in ions that can react efficiently with water (e.g. H2O+ + H2O &rarr; H3O+ + OH) leading to H3O+ becoming the dominant reagent ion. Reaction processes observed are non-dissociative charge transfer (O2+ with TNT and TNB), dissociative charge transfer (O2+ with TNT) and adduct formation (NO+ with PETN and RDX). O2+ is found to be unreactive with PETN and RDX, and under the conditions operating in the reaction region of the PTR-MS only a low signal associated with NO+&middot;TNT was observed. No NO+&middot;TNB was detected.</p>
[Juerschik2013] Juerschik, S., M. Lanza, P. Sulzer, B. Agarwal, E. Hartungen, A. Edtbauer, S. Feil, A. Jordan, G. Hanel, CA. Mayhew, et al., "Designer Drugs and Trace Explosives Detection with the Help of Very Recent Advancements in Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 182, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Sulzer2013] Sulzer, P., T. Kassebacher, S. Juerschik, M. Lanza, E. Hartungen, A. Jordan, A. Edtbauer, S. Feil, G. Hanel, J1. L. S Maerk, et al., "Detection of Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for a real-life monitoring scenario", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 196, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
[Wisthaler2013] Wisthaler, A., JH. Crawford, S. Haidacher, G. Hanel, E. Hartungen, A. Jordan, L. Märk, T. Mikoviny, M. Müller, P. Mutschlechner, et al., "Development of a compact PTR-ToF-MS for Suborbital Research on the Earth's Atmospheric Composition", CONFERENCE SERIES, pp. 96, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf#page=97
[Kohl2013a] Kohl, I., J. Beauchamp, F. Cakar-Beck, J. Herbig, J. Dunkl, O. Tietje, M. Tiefenthaler, C. Boesmueller, A. Wisthaler, M. Breitenlechner, et al., "Non-invasive detection of renal function via breath gas analysis: A potential biomarker for organ acceptance?", 6th International PTR-MS Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications, pp. 24, 2013.
Link: http://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/contributions_ptr_ms_Conference_6.pdf
Abstract
Breath gas analysis is an emerging field that attempts to link components in exhaled breath gas with state-of-health or illness [1]. This is based on the premise that disease in the body will elicit abnormal biochemical reactions which in turn produce chemical compounds that might be excreted by the body - at least in part - via exhalation. We used PTR-MS to directly sample and analyse selected VOC constituents in the exhaled breath of patients (n=96) undergoing kidney transplantation. Breath samples were taken before surgery and then over an extended period thereafter. Comparison of PTR-MS data with routine blood-serum data revealed a specific compound (ion trace) at m/z 115 that correlated with creatinine in blood serum and daily urine production, which are the current generally-accepted markers for kidney function. PTR-TOF analyses revealed that this compound had an exact molecular mass of 114.104 u and a chemical composition of C7H14O. Subsequent analyses using PTR-QqQ-MS suggested the compound to be a C7-ketone or branched C7-aldehyde. It is hoped that the results of this study will provide impetus to other researchers in the field to further delve into the nature of this compound and its possible biochemical production routes to ascertain the eligibility of this compound for potential use in future routine breath analysis for renal function assessment.
[Hartungen2013] Hartungen, E., S. Juerschik, A. Jordan, A. Edtbauer, S. Feil, G. Hanel, H. Seehauser, S. Haidacher, R. Schottkowsky, L. Märk, et al., "Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: fundamentals, recent advances and applications", The European Physical Journal Applied Physics, vol. 61, no. 02: Cambridge Univ Press, pp. 24303, 2013.
Link: http://journals.cambridge.org/production/action/cjoGetFulltext?fulltextid=8836242
Abstract
Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) offers many advantages for trace gas analysis, including no sample preparation, real-time analysis, high selectivity and sensitivity, ultra-low detection limits and very short response times. These characteristic features have made it an ideal tool for many applications in science, technology and society. Here we will discuss recent developments, in particular advances concerning sensitivity, selectivity and general applicability.
[Simpraga2013] Šimpraga, M., H. Verbeeck, J. Bloemen, L. Vanhaecke, M. Demarcke, E. Joó, O. Pokorska, C. Amelynck, N. Schoon, J. Dewulf, et al., "Vertical canopy gradient in photosynthesis and monoterpenoid emissions: An insight into the chemistry and physiology behind", Atmospheric Environment: Elsevier, 2013.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231013005785
Abstract
It is well known that vertical canopy gradients and varying sky conditions influence photosynthesis (Pn), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf thickness (LT) and leaf pigments (lutein, â-carotene and chlorophyll). In contrast, little is known about these effects on monoterpenoid (MT) emissions. Our study examines simultaneously measured Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio along the canopy of an adult European beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) in natural forest conditions. Dynamic branch enclosure systems were used at four heights in the canopy (7, 14, 21 and 25 m) in order to establish relationships and better understand the interaction between Pn and MT emissions under both sunny and cloudy sky conditions. Clear differences in Pn, MT emissions and the MT/Pn ratio were detected within the canopy. The highest Pn rates were observed in the sun leaves at 25 m due to the higher intercepted light levels, whereas MT emissions (and the MT/Pn ratio) were unexpectedly highest in the semi-shaded leaves at 21 m. The higher Pn rates and, apparently contradictory, lower MT emissions in the sun leaves may be explained by the hypothesis of Owen and Peñuelas (2005), stating synthesis of more photo-protective carotenoids may decrease the emissions of volatile isoprenoids (including MTs) because they both share the same biochemical precursors. In addition, leaf traits like SLA, LT and leaf pigments clearly differed with height in the canopy, suggesting that the leaf's physiological status cannot be neglected in future research on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) when aiming at developing new and/or improved emission algorithms.
2012
[Sinha2012a] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "Constraints on instantaneous ozone production rates and regimes during DOMINO derived using in-situ OH reactivity measurements", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 15: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 7269–7283, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/7269/2012/acp-12-7269-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21/11/2008 to 08/12/2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 s−1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[Sulzer2012a] Sulzer, P., S. Juerschik, B. Agarwal, T. Kassebacher, E. Hartungen, A. Edtbauer, F. Petersson, J. Warmer, G. Holl, D. Perry, et al., "Designer Drugs and Trace Explosives Detection with the Help of Very Recent Advancements in Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)", Future Security: Springer, pp. 366–375, 2012.
Link: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-33161-9_55
Abstract
At the "Future Security 2011" we presented an overview of our studies on the "Detection and Identification of Illicit and Hazardous Substances with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS)" including first results on explosives, chemical warfare agents and illicit and prescribed drugs detection. Since then we have considerably extended these preliminary studies to the detection of defined traces of some of the most common explosives, namely TNT, PETN, TATP, and DATP deposited into aluminum foam bodies, and to the detection of a number of novel and widely unknown designer drugs: ethylphenidate, 4-fluoroamphetamine and dimethocaine. Moreover, we have dramatically improved our time-of-flight based PTR-MS instruments by substantially increasing their sensitivity and hence lowering the detection limit, making them even more suitable and applicable to threat agents with extremely low vapour pressures. Data from measurements on certified gas standards are presented in order to underline these statements. The data demonstrate that, in comparison to the first generation instruments, a gain of one order of magnitude in terms of sensitivity and detection limit has been obtained.
[Aaltonen2012] Aaltonen, H., and , "Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor", : Helsingin yliopisto, 2012.
Link: https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/37593
Abstract
Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in chemical reactions in the atmosphere and thus also affect Earth s radiation balance. In this study, chamber and snow gradient techniques for measuring boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. This study reveals that VOCs from soil are emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not correlate with the VOC fluxes. Our results show that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor accounts for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This can be utilized in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment.
[Sinha2012] Sinha, V., J. Williams, JM. Diesch, F. Drewnick, M. Martinez, H. Harder, E. Regelin, D. Kubistin, H. Bozem, Z. Hosaynali-Beygi, et al., "OH reactivity measurements in a coastal location in Southwestern Spain during DOMINO", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 12, no. 2: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4979–5014, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/12/4979/2012/acpd-12-4979-2012.pdf
Abstract
In this study air masses are characterized in terms of their total OH reactivity which is a robust measure of the "reactive air pollutant loading". The measurements were performed during the DOMINO campaign (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) held from 21 November 2008 to 8 December 2008 at the Atmospheric Sounding Station – El Arenosillo (37.1° N–6.7° W, 40 m a.s.l.). The site was frequently impacted by marine air masses (arriving at the site from the southerly sector) and air masses from the cities of Huelva (located NW of the site), Seville and Madrid (located NNE of the site). OH reactivity values showed strong wind sector dependence. North eastern "continental" air masses were characterized by the highest OH reactivities (average: 31.4 ± 4.5 s−1; range of average diel values: 21.3–40.5 −1), followed by north western "industrial" air masses (average: 13.8 ± 4.4 s−1; range of average diel values: 7–23.4 s−1) and marine air masses (average: 6.3 ± 6.6 s−1; range of average diel values: below detection limit −21.7 s−1), respectively. The average OH reactivity for the entire campaign period was  18 s−1 and no pronounced variation was discernible in the diel profiles with the exception of relatively high values from 09:00 to 11:00 UTC on occasions when air masses arrived from the north western and southern wind sectors. The measured OH reactivity was used to constrain both diel instantaneous ozone production potential rates and regimes. Gross ozone production rates at the site were generally limited by the availability of NOx with peak values of around 20 ppbV O3 h−1. Using the OH reactivity based approach, derived ozone production rates indicate that if NOx would no longer be the limiting factor in air masses arriving from the continental north eastern sector, peak ozone production rates could double. We suggest that the new combined approach of in-situ fast measurements of OH reactivity, nitrogen oxides and peroxy radicals for constraining instantaneous ozone production rates, could significantly improve analyses of upwind point sources and their impact on regional ozone levels.
[Nolscher2012] Nölscher, AC., J. Williams, V. Sinha, T. Custer, W. Song, AM. Johnson, R. Axinte, H. Bozem, H. Fischer, N. Pouvesle, et al., "Summertime total OH reactivity measurements from boreal forest during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 12, no. 17: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 8257–8270, 2012.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/8257/2012/acp-12-8257-2012.html
Abstract
Ambient total OH reactivity was measured at the Finnish boreal forest station SMEAR II in Hyytiälä (Latitude 61°51' N; Longitude 24°17' E) in July and August 2010 using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM). The CRM – total OH reactivity method – is a direct, in-situ determination of the total loss rate of hydroxyl radicals (OH) caused by all reactive species in air. During the intensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study) the total OH reactivity was monitored both inside (18 m) and directly above the forest canopy (24 m) for the first time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements, absolute values and the temporal variation have been analyzed here. Stable boundary layer conditions during night and turbulent mixing in the daytime induced low and high short-term variability, respectively. The impact on total OH reactivity from biogenic emissions and associated photochemical products was measured under "normal" and "stressed" (i.e. prolonged high temperature) conditions. The advection of biomass burning emissions to the site caused a marked change in the total OH reactivity vertical profile. By comparing the OH reactivity contribution from individually measured compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity, the size of any unaccounted for or "missing" sink can be deduced for various atmospheric influences. For "normal" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 58%, whereas for "stressed" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 89% was determined. Various sources of not quantified OH reactive species are proposed as possible explanation for the high missing OH reactivity.
2011
[Warneke2011] Warneke, C., P. Veres, JS. Holloway, J. Stutz, C. Tsai, S. Alvarez, B. Rappenglueck, FC. Fehsenfeld, M. Graus, JB. Gilman, et al., "Airborne formaldehyde measurements using PTR-MS: calibration, humidity dependence, inter-comparison and initial results", Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions, vol. 4, no. 4: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4631–4665, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-meas-tech-discuss.net/4/4631/2011/amtd-4-4631-2011.html
Abstract
We present quantitative, fast time response measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) onboard an aircraft using a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument. The HCHO measurement by PTR-MS is strongly humidity dependent and therefore airborne measurements are difficult and have not been reported. The PTR-MS instrument was run in the normal operating mode, where about 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are measured together with HCHO onboard the NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the CalNex 2010 campaign in California. We compare the humidity dependence determined in the laboratory with in-flight calibrations of HCHO and calculate the HCHO mixing ratio during all flights using the results from both. The detection limit for HCHO was between 100 pptv in the dry free troposphere and 300 pptv in the humid marine boundary layer for a one second acquisition time every 17 s. The PTR-MS measurements are compared with HCHO measurements using a DOAS instrument and a Hantzsch monitor at a ground site in Pasadena. The PTR-MS agreed with both instruments within the stated uncertainties. We also compare HCHO enhancement ratios in the Los Angeles basin and in the free troposphere with literature values and find good agreement. The usefulness of the PTR-MS HCHO measurements in atmospheric observations is demonstrated by following an isolated anthropogenic plume. The photochemical production of HCHO can be observed simultaneously with production of acetaldehyde and the photochemical degradation of aromatic compounds using the PTR-MS.
[Simpraga2011] Šimpraga, M., H. Verbeeck, M. Demarcke, É. Joó, O. Pokorska, C. Amelynck, N. Schoon, J. Dewulf, H. Van Langenhove, B. Heinesch, et al., "Clear link between drought stress, photosynthesis and biogenic volatile organic compounds in Fagus sylvatica L.", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 45, no. 30: Elsevier, pp. 5254–5259, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231011006996
Abstract
Direct plant stress sensing is the key for a quantitative understanding of drought stress effects on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions. A given level of drought stress might have a fundamentally different effect on the BVOC emissions of different plants. For the first time, we continuously quantified the level of drought stress in a young potted beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) with a linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) installed at stem level in combination with simultaneous measurements of BVOC emissions and photosynthesis rates at leaf level. This continuous set of measurements allowed us to examine how beech alters its pattern of photosynthesis and carbon allocation to BVOC emissions (mainly monoterpenes, MTs) and radial stem growth during the development of drought stress. We observed an increasing-decreasing trend in the MT emissions as well as in the fraction of assimilated carbon re-emitted back into the atmosphere (ranging between 0.14 and 0.01%). We were able to link these dynamics to pronounced changes in radial stem growth, which served as a direct plant stress indicator. Interestingly, we detected a sudden burst in emission of a non-identified, non-MT BVOC species when drought stress was acute (i.e. pronounced negative stem growth). This burst might have been caused by a certain stress-related green leaf volatile, which disappeared immediately upon re-watering and thus the alleviation of drought stress. These results highlight that direct plant stress sensing creates opportunities to understand the overall complexity of stress-related BVOC emissions.
[Simpraga2011a] Šimpraga, M., H. Verbeeck, M. Demarcke, É. Joó, C. Amelynck, N. Schoon, J. Dewulf, H. Van Langenhove, B. Heinesch, M. Aubinet, et al., "Comparing monoterpenoid emissions and net photosynthesis of beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural conditions", Atmospheric Environment, vol. 45, no. 17: Elsevier, pp. 2922–2928, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231011000884
Abstract
<p>Although biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) only represent a very limited fraction of the plant&rsquo;s carbon (C) budget, they play an important role in atmospheric chemistry for example as a precursor of tropospheric ozone. We performed a study comparing BVOC emissions of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in controlled and natural environmental conditions. A young and adult beech tree was exposed to short-term temperature variations in growth room conditions and in an experimental forest, respectively. This study attempts to clarify how short-term temperature variations between days influenced the ratio between monoterpenoid (MT) emissions and net photosynthesis (Pn). Within a temperature range of 17&ndash;27 &deg;C and 13&ndash;23 &deg;C, the MT/Pn carbon ratio increased 10&ndash;30 fold for the growth room and forest, respectively. An exponential increasing trend between MT/Pn C ratio and air temperature was observed in both conditions. Beech trees re-emitted a low fraction of the assimilated C back into the atmosphere as MT: 0.01&ndash;0.12% and 0.01&ndash;0.30% with a temperature rise from 17 to 27 &deg;C and 13&ndash;23 &deg;C in growth room and forest conditions, respectively. However, the data showed that the MT/Pn C ratio of young and adult beech trees responded significantly to changes in temperature.</p>
[Stavrakou2011] Stavrakou, T., A. Guenther, A. Razavi, L. Clarisse, C. Clerbaux, P-F. Coheur, D. Hurtmans, F. Karagulian, M. De Mazière, C. Vigouroux, et al., "First space-based derivation of the global atmospheric methanol emission fluxes", Atmospheric chemistry and physics, vol. 11, no. 10: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 4873–4898, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/4873/2011/acp-11-4873-2011.html
Abstract
This study provides improved methanol emission estimates on the global scale, in particular for the largest methanol source, the terrestrial biosphere, and for biomass burning. To this purpose, one complete year of spaceborne measurements of tropospheric methanol columns retrieved for the first time by the thermal infrared sensor IASI aboard the MetOp satellite are compared with distributions calculated by the IMAGESv2 global chemistry-transport model. Two model simulations are performed using a priori biogenic methanol emissions either from the new MEGANv2.1 emission model, which is fully described in this work and is based on net ecosystem flux measurements, or from a previous parameterization based on net primary production by Jacob et al. (2005). A significantly better model performance in terms of both amplitude and seasonality is achieved through the use of MEGANv2.1 in most world regions, with respect to IASI data, and to surface- and air-based methanol measurements, even though important discrepancies over several regions are still present. As a second step of this study, we combine the MEGANv2.1 and the IASI column abundances over continents in an inverse modelling scheme based on the adjoint of the IMAGESv2 model to generate an improved global methanol emission source. The global optimized source totals 187 Tg yr−1 with a contribution of 100 Tg yr−1 from plants, only slightly lower than the a priori MEGANv2.1 value of 105 Tg yr−1. Large decreases with respect to the MEGANv2.1 biogenic source are inferred over Amazonia (up to 55 %) and Indonesia (up to 58 %), whereas more moderate reductions are recorded in the Eastern US (20–25 %) and Central Africa (25–35 %). On the other hand, the biogenic source is found to strongly increase in the arid and semi-arid regions of Central Asia (up to a factor of 5) and Western US (factor of 2), probably due to a source of methanol specific to these ecosystems which is unaccounted for in the MEGANv2.1 inventory. The most significant error reductions achieved by the optimization concern the derived biogenic emissions over the Amazon and over the Former Soviet Union. The robustness of the derived fluxes to changes in convective updraft fluxes, in methanol removal processes, and in the choice of the biogenic a priori inventory is assessed through sensitivity inversions. Detailed comparisons of the model with a number of aircraft and surface observations of methanol, as well as new methanol measurements in Europe and in the Reunion Island show that the satellite-derived methanol emissions improve significantly the agreement with the independent data, giving thus credence to the IASI dataset.
[Bon2011] Bon, DM., IM. Ulbrich, JA. de Gouw, C. Warneke, WC. Kuster, ML. Alexander, A. Baker, AJ. Beyersdorf, D. Blake, R. Fall, et al., "Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, no. 6: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 2399–2421, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/2399/
Abstract
Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of  2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.
[Mogensen2011] Mogensen, D., S. Smolander, A. Sogachev, L. Zhou, V. Sinha, A. Guenther, J. Williams, T. Nieminen, MK. Kajos, J. Rinne, et al., "Modelling atmospheric OH-reactivity in a boreal forest ecosystem", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol. 11, no. 18: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 9709–9719, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/9709/
[DeGouw2011] De Gouw, JA., AM. Middlebrook, C. Warneke, R. Ahmadov, EL. Atlas, R. Bahreini, DR. Blake, CA. Brock, J. Brioude, DW. Fahey, et al., "Organic aerosol formation downwind from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill", Science, vol. 331, no. 6022: American Association for the Advancement of Science, pp. 1295–1299, 2011.
Link: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/331/6022/1295.short
Abstract
A large fraction of atmospheric aerosols are derived from organic compounds with various volatilities. A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft made airborne measurements of the gaseous and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that occurred from April to August 2010. A narrow plume of hydrocarbons was observed downwind of DWH that is attributed to the evaporation of fresh oil on the sea surface. A much wider plume with high concentrations of organic aerosol (>25 micrograms per cubic meter) was attributed to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from unmeasured, less volatile hydrocarbons that were emitted from a wider area around DWH. These observations provide direct and compelling evidence for the importance of formation of SOA from less volatile hydrocarbons.
[Williams2011] Williams, J., J. Crowley, H. Fischer, H. Harder, M. Martinez, T. Petäjä, J. Rinne, J. Bäck, M. Boy, M. Dal Maso, et al., "The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010): an overview of meteorological and chemical influences", Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, vol. 11, no. 5: Copernicus GmbH, pp. 15921–15973, 2011.
Link: http://www.atmos-chem-phys-discuss.net/11/15921/2011/acpd-11-15921-2011.html
Abstract
This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation) in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce); mixed forest (Birch and conifers); and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen); indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO), urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2) and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes). None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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