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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

Welcome to the new IONICON scientific articles database!

Publications

Found 1 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Benjamin Stengel  [Clear All Filters]
2017
[1824] Eichler, P., M. Müller, C. Rohmann, B. Stengel, J. Orasche, R. Zimmermann, and A. Wisthaler, "Lubricating Oil as a Major Constituent of Ship Exhaust Particles", Environmental Science {&} Technology Letters, vol. 4, pp. 54–58, jan, 2017.
Link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.estlett.6b00488
Abstract
<p>A proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with the novel CHARON (&ldquo;chemical analysis of aerosol online&rdquo;) aerosol inlet was used for characterization of submicrometer particulate organic matter in ship engine exhaust. Particles were sampled from diluted and cooled exhaust of a marine test bench engine that was operated on residual heavy fuel oil (HFO) and low-sulfur distillate marine gas oil (MGO), respectively. In both fuel operation modes, exhaust particle mass spectra were dominated by polycycloalkanes in the C20-to-C39 range, which are typical main constituents of lubricating oils. Exhaust particle mass spectra were closely reproduced when the engine&rsquo;s lubricant oil was directly measured in aerosolized form. We report emission profiles of lubricant oil hydrocarbons as a function of their volatility and as a function of their carbon atom number. Total emissions of lubricant oil amounted to 183 and 74 mg kW&ndash;1 h&ndash;1 for HFO and MGO combustion, respectively. These values resemble typical oil loss rates of marine four-stroke trunk piston engines in which most of the lubricant is known to be lost through the combustion chamber and the tailpipe. We conclude that marine trunk piston engines are generally prone to high emissions of particles mainly composed of unburned lubricating oil.</p>

Featured Articles

Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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