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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 2 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Angevine, WM  [Clear All Filters]
2003
[Wert2003] Wert, BP., M. Trainer, A. Fried, TB. Ryerson, B. Henry, W. Potter, WM. Angevine, E. Atlas, SG. Donnelly, FC. Fehsenfeld, et al., "Signatures of terminal alkene oxidation in airborne formaldehyde measurements during TexAQS 2000", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 108, no. D3: Wiley Online Library, 2003.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2002JD002502/full
Abstract
Airborne formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements were made by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) at high time resolution (1 and 10 s) and precision (±400 and ±120 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) (2σ), respectively) during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) 2000. Measurement accuracy was corroborated by in-flight calibrations and zeros and by overflight comparison with a ground-based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system. Throughout the campaign, the highest levels of CH2O precursors and volatile organic compound (VOC) reactivity were measured in petrochemical plumes. Correspondingly, CH2O and ozone production was greatly enhanced in petrochemical plumes compared with plumes dominated by power plant and mobile source emissions. The photochemistry of several isolated petrochemical facility plumes was accurately modeled using three nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) (ethene (C2H4), propene (C3H6) (both anthropogenic), and isoprene (C5H8) (biogenic)) and was in accord with standard hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated chemistry. Measurement-inferred facility emissions of ethene and propene were far larger than reported by inventories. Substantial direct CH2O emissions were not detected from petrochemical facilities. The rapid production of CH2O and ozone observed in a highly polluted plume (30+ parts per billion by volume (ppbv) CH2O and 200+ ppbv ozone) originating over Houston was well replicated by a model employing only two NMHCs, ethene and propene.
2002
[Stroud2002] Stroud, CA., JM. Roberts, EJ. Williams, D. Hereid, WM. Angevine, FC. Fehsenfeld, A. Wisthaler, A. Hansel, M. Martinez-Harder, H. Harder, et al., "Nighttime isoprene trends at an urban forested site during the 1999 Southern Oxidant Study", Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984–2012), vol. 107, no. D16: Wiley Online Library, pp. ACH–7, 2002.
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2001JD000959/full
Abstract
[1] Measurements of isoprene and its oxidation products, methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride, were conducted between 13 June and 14 July 1999, at the Cornelia Fort Airpark during the Nashville intensive of the Southern Oxidant Study. Trends in isoprene and its oxidation products showed marked variability from night-to-night. The reaction between isoprene and the nitrate radical was shown to be important to the chemical budget of isoprene and often caused rapid decay of isoprene mixing ratios in the evening. Trends in methacrolein, methyl vinyl ketone, and peroxymethacrylic nitric anhydride were steady during the evening isoprene decay period, consistent with their slow reaction rate with the nitrate radical. For cases when isoprene sustained and even increased in mixing ratio throughout the night, the observed isoprene oxidation rates via the hydroxyl radical, ozone, and the nitrate radical were all small. Sustained isoprene mixing ratios within the nocturnal boundary layer give a unique opportunity to capture hydroxyl radical photochemistry at sunrise as isoprene was observed to rapidly convert to its first stage oxidation products before vertical mixing significantly redistributed chemical species. The observed nighttime isoprene variability at urban, forested sites is related to a complex coupling between nighttime boundary layer dynamics and chemistry.

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Download Contributions to the International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Its Applications:

 

Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
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J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
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W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
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Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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