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Scientific Articles - PTR-MS Bibliography

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Publications

Found 2 results
Title [ Year(Asc)]
Filters: Author is Herrmann, Frank  [Clear All Filters]
2011
[Gros2011] Gros, V., C. Gaimoz, F. Herrmann, T. Custer, J. Williams, B. Bonsang, S. Sauvage, N. Locoge, O. d'Argouges, R. Sarda-Esteve, et al., "Volatile organic compounds sources in Paris in spring 2007. Part I: qualitative analysis", Environmental Chemistry, vol. 8, no. 1: CSIRO, pp. 74–90, 2011.
Link: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=EN10068
Abstract
High-time-resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed in the Paris city centre in spring 2007. The studied region was influenced mainly by air masses of two origins: (1) from the Atlantic Ocean, and (2) from north-eastern Europe. Although the baseline levels (i.e. those not influenced by local emissions) of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and CO were only slightly impacted by changes in the air-mass origin, oxygenated compounds such as acetone and methanol showed much higher baseline levels in continentally influenced air masses. This suggests that NMHC and CO mixing ratios were mainly influenced by local-to-regional-scale sources whereas oxygenated compounds had a more significant continental-scale contribution. This highlights the importance of measuring VOCs instead of NMHC alone in source classification studies. The period of Atlantic air influence was used to characterise local pollution, which was dominated by traffic-related emissions, although traffic represents the source of only one third of total VOCs emissions in the local inventory. In addition to traffic-related sources, additional sources were identified; in particular, emissions from dry-cleaning activities were identified by the use of a specific tracer (i.e. tetrachloroethylene).
2009
[Winterhalter2009] Winterhalter, R., F. Herrmann, B. Kanawati, T. Lam Nguyen, J. Peeters, L. Vereecken, and G. K. Moortgat, "The gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-caryophyllene (C(15)H(24)). Part I: an experimental study.", Phys Chem Chem Phys, vol. 11, no. 21: mistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, D-55020, Mainz, Germany. winterha@mpch-mainz.mpg.de, pp. 4152–4172, Jun, 2009.
Link: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2009/CP/b817824k#!divAbstract
Abstract
The gas phase reaction of ozone with beta-caryophyllene was investigated in a static glass reactor at 750 Torr and 296 K under various experimental conditions. The reactants and gas phase products were monitored by FTIR-spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Aerosol formation was monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and particulate products analysed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The different reactivity of the two double bonds in beta-caryophyllene was probed by experiments with different ratios of reactants. An average rate coefficient at 295 K for the first-generation products was determined as 1.1 x 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Using cyclohexane as scavenger, an OH-radical yield of (10.4 +/- 2.3)% was determined for the ozonolysis of the more reactive internal double bond, whereas the average OH-radical yield for the ozonolysis of the first-generation products was found to be (16.4 +/- 3.6)%. Measured gas phase products are CO, CO(2) and HCHO with average yields of (2.0 +/- 1.8)%, (3.8 +/- 2.8)% and (7.7 +/- 4.0)%, respectively for the more reactive internal double bond and (5.5 +/- 4.8)%, (8.2 +/- 2.8)% and (60 +/- 6)%, respectively from ozonolysis of the less reactive double bond of the first-generation products. The residual FTIR spectra indicate the formation of an internal secondary ozonide of beta-caryophyllene. From experiments using HCOOH as a Criegee intermediate (CI) scavenger, it was concluded that at least 60% of the formed CI are collisionally stabilized. The aerosol yield in the ozonolysis of beta-caryophyllene was estimated from the measured particle size distributions. In the absence of a CI scavenger the yield ranged between 5 and 24%, depending on the aerosol mass. The yield increases with addition of water vapour or with higher concentrations of formic acid. In the presence of HCHO, lower aerosol yields were observed. This suggests that HCOOH adds to a Criegee intermediate to form a low-volatility compound responsible for aerosol formation. The underlying reaction mechanisms are discussed and compared with the results from the accompanying theoretical paper.

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Selected PTR-MS related Reviews

F. Biasioli, C. Yeretzian, F. Gasperi, T. D. Märk: PTR-MS monitoring of VOCs and BVOCs in food science and technology, Trends in Analytical Chemistry 30 (7) (2011).
Link

J. de Gouw, C. Warneke, T. Karl, G. Eerdekens, C. van der Veen, R. Fall: Measurement of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Earth's Atmosphere using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Mass Spectrometry Reviews, 26 (2007), 223-257.
Link

W. Lindinger, A. Hansel, A. Jordan: Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR–MS): on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds at pptv levels, Chem. Soc. Rev. 27 (1998), 347-375.
Link

 

Lists with PTR-MS relevant publications of the University of Innsbruck can be found here: Atmospheric and indoor air chemistry, IMR, Environmental Physics and Nano-Bio-Physics

 

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